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Incredible Sculpture Makes Liquid Flow Backwards Into Oil Can- Or Does It?

Supermajor from matt kenyon on Vimeo.

For SWAMP’s piece Supermajor (a term used in the Gulf Coast referring to the six biggest publicly owned oil companies) the artist collective has created an ingenious and perplexing sculpture that will surely make you take a double take. In the gallery a wire rack of (vintage) oil cans sits.  One oilcan has a visible fissure out of which oil slowly flows cascading onto the pedestal and gallery floor…  The only thing is, the oil isn’t exactly flowing out of the can. Instead, oil appears to slow slowly drop by drop back into the can.  At times the drops of oil hover unsupported in midair. Other times the drops are in the process of a slow motion splash onto the pedestal. This is a piece that can only be fully appreciated in person or on video as the oil literally looks like it is moving backwards in time back into the can.

SWAMP (Studies of Work Atmosphere and Mass Production) was founded in 1999 by artists Douglas Easterly and Matt Kenyon. Focusing on critical themes addressing the effects of global corporate operations, mass media and communication, military-industrial complexes, and general meditations on the liminal area between life and artificial life.

Watch the video above and after the jump to see the piece in action! (via)

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Cerise Doucède’s Fantastical Photos Visualize People Lost In Daydreams

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The fantastical works of Cerise Doucède illustrates the daydreams that we all have. In their series entitled Égarements, the French photographer shows people living their everyday lives, but who are frozen in a moment of contemplation. Around them is disarray, or, their fantasy. A child looks up and sees paper cranes above him while a woman peeling apples is similarly surrounded by the same fruit.

Doucède’s series is alluring in the fantastical sense, as we look at these compositions of where things are out of the ordinary. The photographs are formally striking; it’s visually satisfying to see these things levitate and appear to float in midair, as we’re not used to this sight.

Égarements points to the moments of banality in our lives where we turn to daydreams. Our reality might not be very exciting, so these fantasies come as a form of escapism from the monotony of the everyday. A more optimistic way of looking at this series might be that these people are so engaged in what they are doing that they go beyond what is in front of them to entertain grand possibilities. Maybe we’ll go with that. (Via This Isn’t Happiness)

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The Faint go back on the road to perform Danse Macabre in it’s entirety

The Faint who recently headlined the FYF Fest are going back on the road to celebrate the re-release of their record, Danse Macabre (Deluxe Edition) out on Saddle Creek, November 19th. The remastered limited edition will also include a DVD with tons of cool things from the archives of the band. I’m guessing since the record is only 35 minutes long, they will also perform a ton of other songs from their past and present.  They’ll be in Los Angeles on Sunday, November 18th at the Fonda Theatre and at New York’s Terminal 5 in December with plenty of dates in between and after. As an added bonus, Trust will be opening all shows on this outing. Check out the video for Agenda Suicide and get your tickets to an upcoming show.

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Sarah A. Smith’s Corroded Gold Leaf Drawings

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Sarah A. Smith corrosive gold leaf drawings

Sarah A. Smith creates shimmering gold drawings with a combination of gold metal leaf, corrosive, ink, and pencil on paper. After she arranges the metal leaf that was mined and manufactured in China, she brushes it with copper sulfate, causing a chemical reaction that tarnishes and corrodes the gold metal along the surface of the paper. In the natural environment, this erosion process can take hundreds of years to complete. “The oxidation illustrates pollution, disintegration, transformation of elements, changes, and the passage of time,” Smith says. The result is an incredibly detailed and textured series that while extravagant is also evocative of restraint because it emerges from a process of decay. (via my modern met and diablo magazine)

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Thomas Allen

5bThomas Allen has created an extremely enticing visual display of creativity via vintage pulp paper back cut outs.  I love his work.  You should check him out!

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BEAUTIFUL/DECAY IS HIRING BLOG CONTRIBUTORS!

blog_logo1-565x334-1Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserve exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world  reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then send a few short writing samples (or links) as well as a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay blog contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

We are looking for smart writers and contributors in all corners of the globe who have their hands on the pulse of the contemporary art and design world and want to join our independent group of writers, critics, and art enthusiasts. Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of five 300 word posts per week.  This is a paid freelance position.

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Susan Dobson’s Abandoned Buildings Are Timeless Reminders That It All Turns to Dust

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In photographer Susan Dobson’s series Sense of an Ending, she taps into our fascination of abandoned buildings. We ask ourselves, what happened to these places? Why is no one there, and how did they come to be in such disrepair? The once majestic-looking structures now sit among ruins and overgrown vegetation, and these haunting images remind us that everything built will eventually turn to dust. Dobson often frames her compositions so the homes look tiny when compared to a large, ominous-looking sky.

The photographer’s intention was that these works were timeless. They could point to a post apocalyptic future or relics of the past. In a short statement about her work, Dobson explains:

I am interested in how photographs have the ability to sit outside of any definitive time period, and to feel dislocated in time. It allows for associations to be made with a range of historical periods. For me, the series evokes images I have in my mind of the ruins from WWII that were still evident in Germany when I lived there as a child. (Via Flavorpill)

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: 8 Hours In Brooklyn

Spend 8 splendid, cinematic, slow motion, picture perfect hours in the city of Brooklyn with Next Level Pictures. Watch the full video after the jump.

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