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FUCO UEDA

I’m absolutely loving these sleepy narrative illustrations by Japanese artists Fuco Ueda. It’s as if each painting was painted with the tears of fairies from a far away distant land where animals and cute teenagers lived as equals.

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The New Beauty: Aleah Chapin’s Unabashed Paintings Of Nude Women

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin - oil on linen

Aleah Chapin‘s oil painting series The Aunties is an intimate, realistic, immodest look at a women’s world, as seen and experienced by a woman. The models featured are actually the artist’s mother’s friends, women who she has grown up with, and with whom she has a personal, unadulterated knowledge of. Chapin hasn’t spared any detail in her oversized portraits – we see the female figure in all of it’s beauty. Breasts are saggy, stomach rolls are bunched up, stretchmarks are on full display, pubic hair untamed and exposed, and thighs are dimpled with fatty cellulite.

Full of tender moments between mother and son, or groups of friends, her work is a strong counterpoint to the idealized and unrealistic female body images we are confronted with daily. She says about the subject:

Most women have issues and I’m not immune to that. We’re told that our bodies are supposed to be a ‘certain height, certain size, certain weight’. But the pictures we see are completely unrealistic; they’re very Photoshopped. We all know it when we look at them in magazines and yet, we still compare ourselves. That’s why we need images that show all sorts of bodies – so we can accept every size and shape. (Source)

Chapin paints women in a playful, relaxed, completely natural state. She tries to capture a childlike spirit, which is in all of us, no matter our age or gender. She says:

We generally care more what we look like – probably too much at times, me included. Young women are still trying to fit in. I think when you get older you care less –that’s not a negative thing at all. You’re just more accepting. When you get past a certain age you become invisible – and that’s a whole other problem. For me, it’s about finding beauty in every imperfection. (Source) (Via Hi Fructose)

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MDCCLXIV updates

Yes I know French gif artist MDCCLXIV has been a subject of our blog before, but I just wanted to share this image with you guys… this is how I feel right now. Dizzy and stuffed with colorful food. Still, 2 days after Thanksgiving.

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Porous Walker

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Porous Walker‘s “LOST” is simply hilarious, truthful and yeah, a bit sad. Through this incredibly annoying economy many people, not only in America, but around the world have found themselves in the situation depicted in this flyer. Let’s cheer up and hope that this year will bring lots of goodies to everyone, especially, you know, those with no jobs.

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Matthias van Arkel

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One of my favorite artists, Matthias van Arkel, (who will be appearing in Book 3, btw) recently designed some amazing fabrics and a site-specific painting for the Stockholm Furniture Fair. Matthias usually creates these spaghetti-esque, rubbery abstract-expressionist sculptural-paintings. This aesthetic translates nicely to these flat works…has a very contemporary-Swedish clean feel, beautiful!

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Ben Venom

ListenToMetalWhileYouSleep

Ben Venom aspires to become the “visual commentator” of the culture found in Southern United States. Having grown up in the South, Ben finds himself immensely inspired by not only the culture, but the politics, history, and identity of his roots.

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Conrad Ruiz

I like Conrad Ruiz’s painting a lot but I like his ambition even more. Video by Clement & Co.

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Maurice Mikkers’ Stunning Photographs Of Tears Reveal Their Crystalized Magnificence

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Dutch photographer Maurice Mikkers’ latest project “Imaginarium of Tears” shows that tears, much like snowflakes are all different. His series explores the magnificence of tears on both an aesthetic and molecular level. By placing tears under a microscope, he provides us with a close examination of crystallized tears in such a way that allows you to observe the different sections and patterns present within each tear. Mikkers’ series is based in his interest in tears from a scientific perspective and the way they are each composed of different elements and each have their own chemical structure.

His fascination for the individuality of tears I all the more interesting given the way in which he has chosen the tears to use for his project. Mikkers selected a group of his friends and asked them “what they would like to cry from”. He then gave them a selection of tear inducing activities such as cutting onions, looking into a fan, or eating hot peppers. He says he was highly interested in examining the ways in which each individual tear looks different when examined closely.

The process itself includes capturing the tears with a micropipette, placing them on a microscopic slide, and then letting them settle. The result of his project is a series of tears that are so meticulously different in all their details and, on a larger scale, a merging of science and art.

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