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Design Watch: Muuto Pendant Lamp

We here at B/D think product design is an important aspect of the design and art spectrum because product designers create the objects we live with every day. Artfully designed objects can make your life easier, or in this case brighter, and look good doing it. At first glance this looks like your classic metal pendant lamp, but it’s made of rubber that you can squish! This unexpected element and the bright colors are why we love this Pendant lamp by Form Us With Love for Muuto, if you love it too, it’s available at A+R, click here.

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Better Than LSD!

Stare at this for long enough and you’ll be tripping more than your Dad at Woodstock while Hendrix was shreddin!

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Intricate Digital “Fabergé Fractals” By Tom Beddard Look So Real You Can Almost Grab Them

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Fractals are a geometric concept and mathematical set that represent repeating patterns, also known as self-similarity. Scotland-based physicist and artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue, who we have previously featured for his generative graphic work, has recently been creating 3D geometric fractal designs that he refers to as “Fabergé Fractals” because of the detailed and ornate patterns that are rendered by the artist’s formulaic methods. At first glance, Beddard’s designs appear to be fully realized, physical forms due to the intricacies of the patterns and the technical skill that is applied to each generation.

Beddard explains, “The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.

“The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation.” (via my modern met)

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Nicholas Alan Cope’s Motion And Texture Photographs

Nicholas Alan Cope is a photographer based in Los Angeles. Aside from heavy commercial engagements, he creates wonderful, stark pictures that turn the mundane into extraordinarily arresting figures of motion and texture. He’s recently collaborated with Dustin Edward Arnold (see above image), and the results are mind-blowing. See Cope’s personal work and more Arnold collabs after the jump.

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Damien Hirst’s Little Pink Pill

Damien Hirst - Installation

Damien Hirst - Installation

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Damien Hirst is often known for his menagerie of carefully curated animals. You may have seen his cow, somewhat deconstructed, or his 14-foot tiger shark preserved in a tank of formaldehyde. In his new exhibit, “Schizophrenogenesis,” Hirst turns to a different kind of preservative: the kind that humans use to maintain a delicate mental balance or for the good of our health — or so we have been told.

“Schizophrenogenesis” is a tongue-in-cheek homage (or opposite thereof) to the sleek contemporary design of pharmacology. These IKEA-worthy pills are shown in neon prints or as sculptures, much larger than life. “Pills are a brilliant little form, better than any minimalist art,” Hirst says. “They’re all designed to make you buy them… they come out of flowers, plants, things from the ground, and they make you feel good, you know, to just have a pill, to feel beauty.”

Though out of the ground indeed did they come, the modern-day herbs and remedies Hirst depicts are anything but natural. Viewers are asked to contemplate their artificial curves and edges and the distant bold-faced type of a prescription (“Take SIX capsules FOUR TIMES DAILY,” one says urgently). One bubblegum pink capsule declares, “PFIZER.”

“Schizophrenogenesis” is currently on display at the Paul Stolper Gallery in London until November 15th. (via Artsy)

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Ali Smith Portfolio Site Relaunched

LA based painter and master of thick paint Ali Smith has just relaunched her site.

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Philipp Herrman

 

Swiss designer Philipp Herrmann‘s “DIPLOM 2006” project was taken from the diploma catalogue of the graphic design class at University of Applied Arts in Zurich. I really like how, in the image above, the tape and camera angle beguile the eye to create a sense of depth on a flat surface. Very neat optical illusion!

 

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Thomas Card Documents Outrageous And Alluring Tokyo Street Style

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We’ve always known that as far as street style goes, Tokyo rules. Inhabitants of the city don elaborate outfits and express a strong point of view through their appearance. Photographer Thomas Card’s new book Tokyo Adorned highlights more than 130 photos of these iconic looks. From Lolitas to cosplay to Yamanba, he captures girls who wear gas masks, laced top-hats, and plastic backpacks shaped like bat wings.

The photographer traveled to Tokyo a year after the devastating tsunami hit. “The country experienced an upsurge of national pride,” he writes, “and participants in street fashion increasingly celebrated their unique placement within the Japanese culture at large.”

Card removed his subjects from context (the street) and photographed them in front of a white background. Here, their outfits take center stage, an we’re able to focus on all of the incredible details and painstaking effort that goes into crafting these personas. Some of them are dark while others ooze innocence. Card’s series is a refined, delightful look at the intricacies of these subcultures.

With all this outrageous dress, does the line between personality and appearance ever become blurry? You have to ask yourself, what kind of person wears a full-sized teddy bear as a necklace? Card insists that his subjects know that people are staring, and they have a sense of humor about it. In an interview with Slate, he explains, “Everything from the names they choose for themselves to the particular arrangement of items and accessories and clothing often reflects a particular sense of humor. One woman’s name translates to ‘Barbecue.’ The humor of that is not lost on her.” (Via Fast Company)

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