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Political Icons Transformed Into Comic Book Superhero Currency

Alessandro Rabatti - Collage

Alessandro Rabatti - Collage

Alessandro Rabatti - Collage

Alessandro Rabatti - Collage

The work of Italian artist Alessandro Rabatti humorously comments on the current economic state that the world is in. Using different currencies from around the world, Rabatti rearranges and alters the faces of each political icon and transforms them into a comic book hero. By rearranging and breaking down household faces such as Abraham Lincoln and Queen Elizabeth II, the artist deconstructs their economic status. Each important leader’s status has been elevated from historical legend to fictional superhero, as if their alter egos are really Spiderman, Ironman, and Catwoman. The interesting part about this transformation is that some of these heroes and villains are more recognizable to people than the historical figures themselves.

This series, titled Facebank, comically comments on our economic state and the actual worth of money today. We trust in these icons just as children trust Captain America and the other courageous characters. In creating this series, Rabatti aims to spark a dialogue concerning the current, unstable state of world economics. Another interesting element in the artist’s work is that each face is now wearing a mask. The mask is often associated with hiding one’s identity or giving a false appearance; pretending to be something you are not. This is no doubt another layer in Rabatti’s series, commenting on political figures and their place in society. The artist’s funny and clever artwork combines comic book superheroes, economics, and political satire to create this multifaceted series. (via Design Boom)

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More work from Jeremy Pettis

Jeremy Pettis

Jeremy’s been posted on our blog before but I just stumbled across some older (but newer for you guys) work on his Flickr. The usage of color is amazing and it’s really proof that experimentation in volume can prove to be a great thing!

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Akira Beard’s Water Color Pop Icons

Akira Beard, a San Francisco based artist and teacher at the Academy of Art University, is well known for his engaging watercolor portraitures of pop culture icons. The messages that usually accompany these illustrations are often centered around the issues of cultural topics, such as, identity, society, and race.

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Michael Beitz

Michael Beitz’s sculptures take everyday ideas and turn them on their head. Dining Table (pictured above) is a great example of how a simple object can be transformed into a sculpture full of character and commentary on interpersonal relationships. Make sure to also check out his sculptural street art work after the jump.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Surface Detail

 

Welcome to a myriad of details in an evolving fractal landscape. Courtesy of SubBlue. Watch the full video after the jump.

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Aaron Draper Poignant Yet Hopeful Photographs Of The Homeless

Aaron Draper - Photography 6 Aaron Draper - Photography 1

The Underexposed series illuminates outsiders of the world, homeless people of our streets. Aaron Draper has made the deliberate decision to literally put in the spotlight a dozen of men and women living on the streets, giving an authentic representation of what could happen to any of us. Not wanting to fall into the cliche of taking black and white photographs or insisting on the harsh features of his subjects, Aaron Draper is applying a commercial tone to the way he envisions their lives, giving the viewers a more positive imagery of scenes not so pleasant to usually watch.

That’s the reason the series has gone viral, the viewer is not in a position of guilt, he doesn’t need to feel bad. He is invited to share that special connection the photographer encountered when meeting his subjects. Inspired by John Steinbeck’s vision on dispossessed families struggling to carve their way into life, he spent a lot of time and money getting to know the personalities behind the facade of their humble lives. Using a camera strobe and a documentary effect, Aaron Draper wants to turn around the false perception one might have about homeless life. He says if he can only initiate that shift, his work will be successful in his heart.

The video below details the photography process of the Underexposed series and shows a passionate Aaron Draper at work. (via Trenf)

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Strange Cams

We love DIY art and design here at B/D, so it goes without saying that home made Strange Cams certainly caught our eye. An ongoing project initiated by Los Angeles artists Aurelia Friedland and Michael Manalo, Stange Cams investigates the affordances of defamiliarized, modified, low technology instruments, and how those instruments can shift a user’s perspective (literally) on the community and environment around them. I love the sketchy approach the artists took in designing these new cameras – who would have thought a good ol’ roll of duck-tape, a can of spray paint, and some CVS brand disposable cameras would lead to a whole new genre of photography?  Check out more of the resulting photographs, and some of the Strange Cams themselves after the jump.

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Maya Brym


Maya Brym makes some gorgeously layered paintings. I just wish there were more of them on her site.

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