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Alexandra Valenti

alexandra valentiIf you like pretty ladies, gypsies, wild beasts, and mystical sunsets, I bet you would love the photography of Alexandra Valenti. You can just tell this girl knows how to live and we are jealous. So keep it up Alexandra! Oh and her site is rad so check it out (click her name).

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Caroline Achaintre Hand Tufted Wool Paintings

Caroline Achaintre proves that you don’t need a drop of acrylic or oil to make amazing paintings. Achaintre’s hand tufted wool pieces mix abstraction, grotesque imagery, and geometric shapes to create powerful images that make you question what painting can be and should be. (via vvork)

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Andrew Clark

Andrew Clark’s illustrations have a beautiful vintage feel to them. I’m not positive about this but I believe most are made with colored pencils which give them a slightly faded quality that is brilliant in a world of neon colors and digital pixels.

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Spencer Murphy’s Architects Of War

Spencer Murphy has several great bodies of work in his portfolio but I have to say that my favorite is his Architects Of War series. There wasn’t much text about this series but it looks like images taken at a weapons trade show. It’s amazing how casual and laid back the salesmen/saleswomen appear in the photos while selling products that can potentially kill thousands and create chaos in countries around the world. It’s quite creepy.

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Lichtfront and Grosse8

This video is bananas. Two design teams from Cologne, Germany, Lichtfront and Grosse 8, produced the video using a number of methods. First, making the sculpture and then placing four projectors “around the object. The graphics were done in AfterEffects. [They] worked in a composition that was cut into the four output movies at the end. Then played the four videos on two computers, synchronized by a vvvv patch,” explains a member of Lichtfront. Now, that makes exactly zero sense to me, but maybe you’ll understand their wizard-talk.

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Nick Albertson’s Photographic Patterns Made From Mundane Objects

Nick Albertson lives and works in Chicago, IL. He meticulously organizes mundane household items such as straws, napkins, rubber bands, and coat hangers until they form a textural tapestry. He then photographs these geometric abstractions and presents them as elaborate patterns. His work reminds the viewer that everything is part of a bigger whole and that beauty can be found in all things.

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Jacob Everett’s Celebrity Doodled Portraits

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With your face close to Jacob Everett‘s ball point pen drawings, you’ll notice they look very similar to the endless swirling pen marks of a distracted mind.  The kind of meaningless doodles we may do while speaking on the phone.  If you zoom out, however, the doodles turn into detailed portraits of celebrities.  For his Well Known Faces series, Everett painstakingly arranges the tiny swirls to create huge portraits.  First, he sketches and graphs his subjects before layering them in swirls section by section.  He says of his work:

“I am interested in the contrast between the minute, repetitive mark-making and the highly personal image that is created. The process is similar to mass production. I work from photographs, concentrating on one section of the face at a time. Over several shifts spent in this way, the work culminates in a finished product which is, paradoxically, an authentic and personal portrait.”

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Young Candy Maker Shinri Tezuka Creates Realistic Lollipops That Are Almost Too Pretty To Eat

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Young Japanese artist/candy maker Shinri Tezuka keeps a centuries old tradition alive known as amezaiku. This is the art of making lollipops from sugar, water, starch and food coloring. What makes Tezuka unique is how he takes this technique to the next level by creating beautiful creatures which are almost too good to eat.
His latest creations are of the aquatic variety and engage in an almost scientific-like aesthetic. His work becomes a study in temporary beauty and in this case water creatures such as lion head goldfish, frogs and tadpoles are elegantly rendered. Their ultra realistic nature hints at the eerie and tends to look similar to watercolor paintings or glass sculptures one might find in a curio shop.  Much more than a candy made to be consumed Tezuka takes it to the next level with craft and allows the sweet sticks to cross over into fine art. The realistic quality make them almost impossible to eat because of their beautiful aesthetic.
The first candies resembling Lollipops date back to the middle ages when nobility would eat boiled sugar on sticks. The modern day lollipop is credited to a man named George Smith who trademarked the name in 1931 after a racehorse named Lolly pop. He originaly sold soft rather than hard candy on a stick. When broken down the word lolly pop means tongue slap. (via spoontamago)

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