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Street Artist “MEGGS” Creates Explosive Murals That Radiate Off The Walls

MEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray Paint

The explosive street art of David Hooke, otherwise known as “MEGGS”, moves in waves of color on walls all over the world. His murals harness an incredible energy and force that radiates off the streets in vivid streaks like flames consuming the building. The Australian artist often uses powerful animals such as tigers, snakes, and lions in his work, creating an incredible composition of strong imagery. His use of diagonal lines and composition just add to the already dramatic atmosphere.

MEGGS pull inspiration from an eclectic variety of different sources such as the natural world and socio-cultural issues. His use of bold color and the occasional loud text included in his murals shows a heavy influence from pop-culture. His technique and experimental technique reflects his determination and excitement in his artistic exploration. MEGGS doesn’t just stick to the traditional spray paint. One of murals in downtown LA also includes a glow in the dark stencil layer that creates an eye-popping affect. This piece, along with other of his murals, is based off of a previously done screen print of MEGGS. You can find his work not just in LA, but also in Hong Kong, London, San Francisco, Paris, and Tokyo.

“His life manifesto is that the ‘journey is the reward’ and his work reflects his eternal search for balance. MEGGS’ emphasis on constant growth and passion for travel is demonstrated by his continual exploration of artistic techniques and mediums.”

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Adorably Grotesque: The Inverted Stuffed Animals Of Kent Rogowski

Kent Rogowski, Bears - Soft Sculpture Kent Rogowski, Bears - Soft SculptureKent Rogowski, Bears - Soft SculptureKent Rogowski, Bears - Soft Sculpture

Kent Rogowski is a Brooklyn-based artist who alters consumer products as a means of exploring the emotional and cultural roles such objects play in our lives. We featured his Everything I Wish I Could Be project a couple years ago, wherein Rogowsky reconfigured self-help books in order to construct subjective narratives of experience and self-definition. The series featured here, titled Bears, takes an arguably darker — but no less profound — approach to our relationship with material objects. By inverting (formerly) adorable stuffed animals and re-stuffing them, Rogowsky has created a cast of strange, sad, and grotesque characters. The visibility of their internal structures has an undeniably disturbing effect; with their exposed seams, spilling stuffing, and lidless eyes, they look like the flayed and eviscerated versions of our childhood companions. As Sarah Verdone eloquently (and humorously) wrote for Paper Magazine: “If Hannibal Lecter, Martin Margiela and a blind speed freak had a three-way in a Build-A-Bear workshop, these creatures would be their mutant offspring” (Source).

But Rogowski’s project is not just about clashing the cute with the grotesque — which, in a way, alienates us from material objects typically associated with nostalgia and comfort. His mutilated creations, in their sordid states of innocent suffering, are portraits of the hardships we experience as we grow, struggle, and change. Despite their crippling disfigurement, the stuffed creations maintain an appearance of love and loyalty, steadfastly “holding it together,” waiting for you to return home while everything slowly unravels at the seams. In a fascinating statement about this project, Rogowski writes:

“They are at once hideous yet cuddly, […] while offering a metaphor for us all to consider. These bears, which have lived and loved and lost as much as their owners, have suffered and endured through it all. It is by virtue of revealing their inner core might we better understand our own.” (Source)

Check out Rogowski’s website for more examples of his insightful explorations of consumer products and the way they impact our internal lives. (Via Design Faves)

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Terrifying Images Of Ukraine Before And After The Recent Riots

kiev riots

kiev riots

kiev riots

Ukraine riots

Amidst the overwhelming violence seen in Ukraine’s recent riots, Gizmodo’s Jesus Diaz (an outsider) decides to create visually stunning, but heartbreaking images that explore Ukraine’s reactions to the sudden cultural and political changes.

By taking some of the techniques applied by Sergey Larenkov on his famous series, The Ghosts of World War II, Diaz creates images that merge shots of Kiev from before and after the Ukraine riots using the same vantage points. Through this technique, a masterful trick made possible by the almighty Photoshop, the viewer is able to experience two polar opposites: a happy, peaceful Ukraine, and a chaotic Ukraine.

Looking at the dramatic contrast between happy people enjoying the sun and peace and the anger of people behind in barricades is disheartening.

(via Sploid)

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Illustrator Felipe Goncalves

Felipe Goncalves atSea4web

Felipe Goncalves draws silly doodles.  Some are better than others, but his drawings have a charm of their own.

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Carolin Reichert’s absent presence

"Fake Fridays"

"Fake Fridays", 2007

Carolin Reichert’s work deals with an inventory of the human memory as triggered by situations, encounters and objects referring to and rooted in the past, yet recurring and manifesting themselves anew in the present. She is interested in exploring the individual’s perception of reality and the role and capacities of memory and recollection within that process. The images portray brief moments, belonging to the past, frozen, re-framed and deliberately transported to their new context, with which they are at odds or incompatible, therefore ultimately dealing with the attempt, possibility and implications of visualizing ‘absent presence’.

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Abstract Paintings Created With The Help Of Larvae

Emil Lukas - Painting Emil Lukas - Painting

Emil Lukas - Painting

Emil Lukas doesn’t actually paint, and half the time he has larvae do it for him. The Pennsylvanian artist’s recent exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery was comprised of two bodies of work: one of paintings made entirely with fine thread, and the other artworks with many layers of larvae trails recorded in ink. His strategies to create these works are particular, and in the case of the larvae pretty unconventional. Lukas’ creativity is reactive and set in the present. With his thread paintings, he mounts one thread across the canvas, considers its placement and compositional purpose, and then continues the same process with the next. In a macro and micro sense the work is contemplative, as each thread is placed with purpose, but also that the final composition should turn out having the same slow and purposeful glow as the act itself.

In the summer, Lukas keeps fly larvae eggs in a converted Tractor Factory that he uses to create his ink-path pieces. He covers the larvae in ink, and uses light and shadow to manipulate their route. After, he applies a translucent wash over the trails, and repeats. The level of control that Lukas can maintain is both impressive and essential, as the strategy seems to form a good balance between chance and design that produces consistent but unexpected work. The paths end up looking like tree roots or coral. Nature is ever-present in the layers of Lukas’ paintings. (Via Artnet)

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The Dark Wintery Wonderlands Inside Walter Martin & Paloma Muñoz’s Snow Globes

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Proving that snow globes aren’t just kitschy souvenirs, artist duo Walter Martin and Paloma Muñoz create mini worlds covered by glass domes that are dark, gloomy, and slightly sinister. The scenarios they build are usually set in a stark wintery landscape and feature characters carrying out strange, ill-disposed acts on each other.

Working together since 1994, Martin and Muñoz source different figurines or model making elements, cut them up and re-assemble them as victims or criminals at a crime scene. They use plumber’s epoxy to build the base of the scenes, and cover it in a water resistant resin. Then, they fill up the globes with a water and alcohol solution, to create the authenticity of the object.

Taking inspiration from dreams, movies, and literature, the pair is happy to build on a bizarre or surreal narrative. Their scenes are very dark indeed: A man is caught in the act of dropping a boulder onto another man’s face, or we watch a woman suspiciously planting a dead tree in the snow, or two men vindictively dangling children over a deep dark well, all surrounded by the stillness of snow and winter. They see their snow globes as a celebration of that uneasy feeling you get when you are lost in a crowd, or left alone somewhere uncomfortable. Martin reflects on the environment that he grew up in and those feelings he experienced within them:

I always liked a good snowstorm, and so many of my best memories revolve around those occasions. The water is the thing in Norfolk and Virginia Beach. Everything that comes out of it, everything that you can do on it, or in it, is special. (Source)

Their globes and a number of other artist’s impressions of winter were also featured previously in a post on B/D. Click here to check out the different ideas of just what that wintery spirit is all about.

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The Sad Three-Eyed Boy Sculptures Of Seungchun Lim

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Seungchun Lim sculpture10

Korean artist Seungchun Lim creates life-size sculptures.  His work is steeped in narrative, each piece a character.  Seungchun’s sculptures are, in fact, part of a complex story.  The three eyed boy above is born with a hump in his back that turns out to be wings.  Eventually his wings are stolen from him.  Independent of their grand tale, Seungchun’s sculptures still exude an air lonliness and sadness.  His characters wordlessly communicate through their powerful but quiet imagery.

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