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Erwin Wurm

"House Attack", 2006

"House Attack", 2006

Austrian sculptor Erwin Wurm has been developing an ongoing series of “One Minute Sculptures” since the late 1980’s in which he poses himself or his models in unexpected relationships with everyday objects close at hand, prompting the viewer to question the very definition of sculpture. He seeks to use the “shortest path” in creating each piece — a clear and fast, sometimes humorous, form of expression. As the sculptures are fleeting and meant to be spontaneous and temporary, the images are only captured in photos or on film.

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Christo Dagorov’s Drawings Transform Lips Into Surreal Landscapes

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Swiss artist and illustrator Christo Dagorov’s series Lips features surreal drawings of – you guessed it – human lips. Although they mimic the shape, Dagorov transforms them with textures that you wouldn’t see on someone’s face. The artist uses pencil to create a forest, prison, and even a group of naked bodies.

If the series wasn’t titled Lips, there’s a chance you might not realize that they are the subject of Dagorov’s drawings. He covers their supple surface with his own imagination and effectively turns them into tiny landscapes with short, narrative tales. But, because know they are intended as lips, it adds another layer of intrigue. These images represent a story that’s being told and a visual way to signify words coming off lips. (Via Colossal)

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Juno Calypso Explores Femininity With Bizarre Rituals Of Beauty And Seduction

Popcorn Venus

Popcorn Venus

12 Reasons You're Tired All The Time

12 Reasons You’re Tired All The Time

Agency

Agency

Massage

Massage

London photographer Juno Calypso’s self portraits as her alter ego “Joyce” are hilariously deadpan images of the artist as bored receptionist, unenthusiastic sexy girl in a cake, porno modeling agent, and deranged housewife looking for the next beauty miracle. The meticulously staged retro scenes are created perfectly with the artist posing with her signature blank stare that says “My life is exhausting and void of joy.” The result is an unsettling take on the extreme efforts that women go through to be everything from homemaker to career woman and the draining effects that it produces. (via feature shoot)

Calypso states about her work:

” I recently began working with self-portraiture, which led to the creation of a character named Joyce. Within elaborately staged large format photographs and videos I draw upon personal experience to perform critical studies into modern rituals of beauty and seduction. We find Joyce alone, consumed by artifice – trapped inside pastel-coloured encounters with beauty masks, cream cakes and polyester negligee; her glazed appearance acting as a mirror to the exhaustion felt whilst bearing the dead weight of constructed femininity.”

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Studio Visit: Marci Washington’s Paintings Tell Gothic-Romantic Tales

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Marci Washington. See the full studio visit and interview with Marci and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

We visited Marci in her backyard studio in Berkeley. It sits just behind her home, a kind of garage/storage space that got converted into a cottage. It’s comfortable and functional, with an open feel to it. Marci is full of gusto— she talks with her hands, takes on all kinds of facial expressions, and she’s funny as hell. She enthusiastically moved through our conversations, at turns awkward and eloquent, but always unguarded and real. We talked about a lot of things, but her affinity for the landscape of the English moorlands, particularly within the context of Romantic Literature, really struck me. Those rolling, uncultivated hills covered in low-growing grass, shrouded under heavy fog and moody skies have wholly captured Marci’s imagination. And it makes sense that they have— much of what interests Marci is mirrored in that rugged, desolate scenery. In various Romantic and Gothic works of literature, the moorlands often represent mystery, mysticism, liberation, turmoil, and passion; they frequently echo the psychological state of the characters, and reveal their greatest desires and fears. Marci’s current work references not just the physical landscape of the moors, but also speaks to themes found in a lot of this kind of literature, and the universal emotions that are evoked—all those feelings and ideas that run wild with mystery, awe, darkness, terror and beauty. I think Marci is after a particular kind of mood that toes the line between terrifying and thrilling, creating a response that’s simultaneously overwhelming and invigorating. All of this plays into her sensibilities as an artist, but also as a person: her love of Edward Gorey and his eerie illustrated books, her unflinching need to feel everything very deeply, her leanings towards the bizarre and unique, and her fondness for the not-entirely-explained. It’s pretty damn amazing that come November Marci will be showing work in England, not far from the wild and lonely moors that have taken up so much of her imagination.

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Emile Morel’s Digitally Surreal Universes

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Emile Morel creates surreal digital illustrations reminiscent of whimsical childhood fantasies such as The Neverending Story and Where the Wild Things Are. His illustrations depict dream worlds, often with children, and heavily feature anthropomorphic characters rife with bestial and primal imagery. His work is evocative of fairy tales, complete with a dark and foreboding element encapsulated in the “grotesque” nature of some of his figures and human animal hybrids. Intimate and highly allegorical, Morel’s attention to detail, especially in this medium, is impressive.

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The Creators Project Interviews Karl Sadler

The Creators Project recently interviewed digital-installation renaissance man Karl Sadler about his role as both an artist & a director. The interview highlights his latest project, “The Sculpture of The Album,” made in collaboration with popular London-based band The XX. Through harnessing technology and art, Sadler gives visual form to the band’s music, creating a physical representation of the intangible. The piece sheds light on what happens when media and message are mixed, and, on a broader level, the creative process. Visit The Creative Project site to read the full interview with Sadler, as well as explore other creatives from around the world working across a broad range of media. If you’re in the NYC area, stay tuned for The Creators Project Launch Event June 26!

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Brian Michael Gossett

Los Angeles based Brian Michael Gossett’s illustrations look like a good time, full of explosive color, silkscreened texture, and visual pop!

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Ethan Hayes-Chute

Ethan Hayes-Chute

Very cool paintings and mixed-media work from artist Ethan Hayes-Chute. Working out of Freeport, Maine, and Berlin, Germany, he also creates artist’s books and large-scale installations that explore ideas of self-sufficiency, self-preservation and self-exclusion as models for living. Best of all, he possess an incredible double-barreled last name, so of course we had to give this man a shout out.

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