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Sophia Collier’s Water-like Portraits Of The Wind

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Working in her studio in Sausalito, CA, sculptor Sophia Collier uses a combination of acrylic block and algebraic function (with a little help from a CNC router), to carve sculptures of wind. The clear, floating relief works look like freeze-frame slices of the water’s surface. She spends a great deal of time replicating the effects that both wind and light create on a large body of water using custom rendering software and sound recordings of the wind. Collier carefully mimics its movements and reactions with a series of digital “brushes” she has created, working to develop unique strings of information to carve out each piece. The sound waves move and fluctuate in the digital space just as they do in the physical realm—and the result is a crystallized portrait of the wind, giving the visual effect of sunlit water. She outlines her entire process here.

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Ernest Zacharevic’s Street Art Plays With Its Neighborhood

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Perhaps more so than any other form of art, street art has the capacity to engage with the neighborhood its found in.   The work of artist Ernest Zacharevic, also known simply as ZACH, takes this to a literal extent.  ZACH’s murals are often found interacting with features of the building or objects nearby.  A bike leaning against the wall becomes a vehicle for a spray painted child or dock posts become giant pencils.  ZACH highlights the life of the city in a way by actually making it come alive.  The walls seem poised to interact with passersby, and encourage engagement.

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The Future Of Painting: An Amazing New Method To Paint 3D Printed Surfaces

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A brand new method for painting 3D objects may just revolutionize the way our cups, shoes, masks, vases, or car parts are decorated. Basically any type of object – and not necessarily a 3D printed one, can undergo this process, and come out with a multicolored pattern transferred onto it’s surface. Researchers from Hangzhou’s Zheijiang University and NYC’s Columbia University ave come up with this idea, one that they call computational hydrographic printing.

Hydrographic printing isn’t entirely a new thing – in the past, patterns were applied onto a thin film of plastic sitting on a body of water. The object was then dipped into the water, through the adhesive-soaked film. The trouble with that method is that the pattern was stretched around the sides of the item, warping and ruining the design. It could never yield consistent results. But this is the difference now:

….what they do is 3-D scan whatever object they want to print on before they dunk it. Algorithms then take whatever pattern you want to paint on it, and print it on the layer of transparent film in such a way that, when lowered into the water bath by a robotic arm, the pattern will be applied perfectly, every time. (Source)

With this method, you can repeatedly dunk the item, and decorate multiple sides, without the pattern getting screwed up. Be sure to watch the video to watch the whole incredible process. (Via Fast Code Design)

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Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via)

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Dr. Seuss’s “Unorthodox Taxidermy” Brings Magical Creatures To Life

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In the late 1930s, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) brought his imaginary creatures to life, sculpting them out of wood, mounting them on the wall, and imbuing them with a haunting realism by incorporating real animal parts. The remains of deceased animals came from his father’s workplace, the Forest Park Zoo.

After their construction, the creatures, bearing delightful names like the “Andulovian Grackler” and the “Two Horned Drouberhannis,” were sold as a collection under the title “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy.” After living in a child’s bedroom, the pieces were retired to an old barn and resold in 2004. The Chase Group later made resin copies of many of the works. Some of these pieces are available for sale on eBay.

Each sculpture stays true to Seuss’s touchingly earnest connection with the imaginative realm of childhood. The animals, though mounted on a wall, maintain a poignant emotive ability; the marriage of raised brows and mellow smiles with the antlers of genuine beasts makes the works magically vital, communicative— and somehow— real.

The profound soulfulness of the work is only enhanced by its hints of morbidity. In what is perhaps a critique of taxidermy practices, the prolific artist chose to present these fantastical creatures within the context of human domination, forcing viewers to reconcile our desire to believe in magic with the knowledge of environmental destruction. In this way, the aging of the works has not detracted from their potency but has serendipitously heightened it; years after the prolific author’s death, we are asked to search these faded faces for indicators of bestial personalities and traces of the beloved artist’s hand. Take a look. (via This is Colossal and the world’s best ever)

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A Day In Decay: Traction Ave

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One of the upsides to working downtown is the ability to walk to get lunch. I know everyone thinks that we never walk anywhere in LA but I’m here to say that I walk a solid two blocks to get lunch everyday. (Take that NYC!) So this week, I decided to take my trusty digi cam on my trek and see what’s new on our local street art spot. I’m not sure why this corner gets continually covered in posters but there is a new poster up on this thing every damn day.

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Alex Griffin

Alex Griffin sent in his application for initiation into The Cult Of Decay a few weeks back and after some paperwork, secret handshake training, and cult training he has been happily approved. Take a look at Alex’s paintWelcome to the cult Alex!

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Xue Jiye’s Intense Paintings of Contorted Human Figures in Barren Wastelands

High level of intensity from Chinese artist Xue Jiye. No additives or preservatives.

Working mostly in earthy/flesh tones, Xue just goes for all-out anguish in his work. Contorting and mutilating his subjects, he reduces us all to our most animalistic, base tendencies. I never mind when an artist chooses to bring the pain when the work is as good as these are.

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