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Anne De Vries

Anne De Vries
Anne De Vries is interested in “reducing a staged scene into a two dimensional image and then photographing it. The image becomes further removed from a dominant physical presence and allows the focus to shift more to the codes and spells that these tableaus evoke. These images are meant to exploit the visual and iconographic potential of the common world as a language.” Check out “Constructing Virtual Reality” (in collaboration with art group AIDS 3D– there’s something weird with their site right now, we’re not trying to give you guys computer viruses…) where a semblance of a 80’s/90’s cyber world is created by photographic tricks: long exposures and grid made out of strings with black light.

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Melissa Brown’s Cave View

Nestled around a fire, inside a cozy cave, the first painter picked up some charcoal and drew a Mastodon.  The Cave is also the place where Plato described the world unenlightened people view as “shadows of the images the fire throws” against the back wall.  Courbet painted his cavern, The Source of the Loue, with an oarsman like the mythical Charon, ferrying people across the river Styx for a coin.  Caves are mysterious places, tied into our deepest roots: metaphors for our experiences, fears, and knowledge.  Melissa Brown, who we did a studio visit with a few months ago, has been working with an interesting group of printmakers at Random Number.  She has a new silkscreen out – Cave View.  Check, it, out.

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KIM KEEVER’s Miniature World

KIM KEEVER’s large-scale photographs are created by meticulously constructing miniature topographies in a 200-gallon tank, which is then filled with water. These dioramas of fictitious environments are brought to life with colored lights and the dispersal of pigment, producing ephemeral atmospheres that he must quickly capture with his large-format camera.

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Jason Holley

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Los Angeles based illustrator Jason Holley creates beautiful illustrations that often resemble intricate, old-timey medical drawings but with a certain twist. His illustrations have a sense of decay, as if he attaches the age of these styles onto his work as well. It appears dirty, but the close attention to detail, space, and color really pulls his work into something gorgeous.

I had Jason Holley as a teacher of mine over at Art Center College of Design. He wasn’t an easy professor, but that is because he really pushes us to pass our established potential. He is an amazing person to learn from.

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Kimiko Yoshida

Kimiko Yoshida

Since Japanese photographer Kimiko Yoshida “fled [her] homeland to escape the mortifying servitude and humiliating fate of Japanese women, she seeks to take a feminist stance in protest against contemporary cliches of seduction” and the general stereotyped portrayal of women-hood. Her self portraits transform and that to her is the ultimate value of work.

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Mel Davis’ Begin Here

Berkeley based artist Mel Davis has just opened her latest exhibition at Eleanor Harwood Gallery entitled Begin Here. From the press release: “With these new paintings, Mel Davis explores the polarities between the natural and the allegorical, the decorative and the expressive, the representational and the gestural. She is engaged in a conversation that exists between these states, measuring the gaps between thought and language, trying to expand on her diverse visual vocabulary. Integral in Davis’s new paintings is the notion of foliage as a connecting thread, both pictorial and metaphorical, describing a taut emotional and private landscape that illustrates the potency of variation. The works are engaged in a simple pared down composition but push an expansive, dramatic and romantic use of language. Always with the goal of achieving visual pleasure, the paintings are calculations of light shifts, the space that trees occupy, the reverie that happens when looking out a window, reminding us of our fragile coexistence with the natural world and its everlasting powers.” The show is on view through April 27th, 2013.

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Erik Sommer’s Cement Paintings

These textural paintings by Erik Sommer are created using cement. Let’s hope he doesn’t have a twenty pound concrete business card too.

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Jonathan Bréchignac’s Meticulous Ballpoint Pen Drawings Inspired By Muslim Prayer Rugs

Jonathan Brechignac - Drawing 1 Jonathan Brechignac - Drawing 3 Jonathan Brechignac - Drawing 8 Jonathan Brechignac - Drawing 11

Intricate patterns, lines and geometric motifs drawn with a Bic, a classic French ballpoint pen. Jonathan Bréchignac, head designer of the JoeAndNathan studio based in Paris fills rather large white pages with complex drawings. The first few ones of his ‘Carpets’ series were meant to represent by their sizes, shapes and ornaments; a Muslim prayer rug.

Jonathan Bréchignac takes about six to eight months to complete a design. He painstakingly depicts directly on paper. He traces directly with no draft before hand. What he designs is directly inspired by Muslim art and architecture. He smoothly blends traditional non-figurative Arabic patterns to modern motifs and elements from French Roman, traditional Japanese, Native American and Mexican culture.

Why does he uses a Bic? A Bic is a typical french pen with a fine point which allows to write and trace minuscule details. It’s cheap, effective, lasts long and has been used for decades from French students to workers in factories. It’s the equivalent to a yellow pencil for Americans.

There’s no rush or deadline when Jonathan Bréchignac starts working on a piece. He likes the idea of dedicating some of his precious time to a long process achievement. In his field, making sketches and pitching ideas can take quite a long time and can be thrown away in a matter of seconds. The idea behind the Muslim rug drawings is to create a long lasting and pleasurable work of art. (via Design Boom).

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