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Andrew Bannecker

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Andrew Bannecker is an illustrator from Washington D.C. His style is a mix of clean, simple shapes, with textures giving it an aged look. But his work is far from simple: just looking at it work sparks your imagination.  Traversing a variety of different subjects, his characters have a retro 60’s cartoon twist to them. I dig it!

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Fortunato Castro Dresses As His Mother In Stunning Exploration Of Female Eroticism

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The 27-year-old Fortunato Castro grow up listening to his mother recall vivid memories of her youth in El Salvador. Now a photographer, Castro returns to images of his mother at his age. The art theorist Roland Barthes once wrote about his search for his late mother within photographs of her; in the series Some Girl, Some Where, Castro takes it a step further, animating the vintage photographs by dressing and posing as his mother.

In the poignant series, Castro doesn’t intend to impersonate his mother in a literal sense; rather, the images read as a son seeking to understand his mother and her youth by physically placing himself in her shoes. Each image is shot with earnest reverence; every gesture he sees his mother make is carefully mimicked, from the concentrated application of mascara to the self-conscious covering of the chest.

Photographically, Castro sees differences in the images of young women today and of his mother’s generation. The modern snapshots that permeate our culture, he suggests, are more casual and candid; a girl takes a shot of her friends as they get ready for a night out, or a woman sends an intimate selfie to her lover. The photographs of his mother’s youth are more serious and polished, and he conveys that elegantly, acknowledging the viewer in each image and positioning himself with careful deliberation.

The obvious sexuality of the photographs remain touchingly innocent; Castro’s curiosity about his mother’s body reads more like a confessional than an exploitation. He returns to the sensual exploration of childhood, using his own body to navigate his feelings about his mother’s. Take a look. (via NYMag)

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Jon Rafman’s New Age Demanded


Montreal-based artist Jon Rafman‘s series New Age Demanded is dominated by a distorted, bodiless figure made from textures and skin taken from paintings by artists – such as Gerhard Richter and Franz Kline – and made anew. With the aid of photoshop, Rafman collages numerous different elements onto the deformed classical bust and its background to mix old with new, high art with low art, and craft with technology. More after the jump.

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Mark Gonzales Studio Sale

MarkGonzales-Sale Legendary skateboarder and artist Mark Gonzales is getting ready to do some spring cleaning, and if you are in New York you can reap the benefits.  The Gonz is hosting a studio sale, selling original drawings, zines, shirts, and much more.  The sale takes place at 580 Broadway on March 29th from 11-8PM.  Hit the jump for some more from Mark.

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Morgan Faye’s Fairytale

Morgan Faye’s illustrations take you to a far away land full of wonder and mystery.

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“Art Works Every Time” T-Shirt Teaser

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B/D head of security, Ziggy, models the “Art Works Every Time” t-shirt, which will be given away to the first 100 people to arrive at our opening tomorrow night, June 12 from 8-11!

The shirt features Colin Strandberg’s award-winning design (which you have seen on our exhibition flyer) and super-shiny metallic gold and silver ink! (Shiny!) I’m only exaggerating slightly when I say that this shirt is badder then fixed gears and cigarettes COMBINED. So come early! Details and more of Ziggy vogue-ing it after the cut.

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Julian Schnabel, Judy Chicago And Other Artists Who Use Dinnerware As Art

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party

Julian Schnabel

Julian Schnabel

Molly Hatch

Molly Hatch

Drawn to the material for aesthetic or symbolic reasons, many artists have incorporated glass or dinnerware into their work.  Julian Schnabel is probably the most prominent artist who has incorporated dinnerware into his practice.  He created his famous “plate paintings” in the 1970s/80s and they became some of his best-known work.  Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party is another famous instance, but with a feminist theme.  Chicago depicted place settings for 39 mythical and historical well-known women.  Each setting features symbols relating to a specific woman’s accomplishments.  Josiah McElheny creates finely crafted, handmade glass objects that he uses to make museological displays depicting one’s attempts to learn about historical peoples from their household possessions and objects.  Molly Hatch is an artist and designer who grew up on a dairy farm in Vermont.  She studied ceramics alongside painting, drawing and printmaking and incorporates all of them into her work.  Jason Kraus uses glasses and flatware to generate reiterations of the same setup.  For instance, for his installation at Redling Fine Art Kraus served a nearly identical meal for the first seven nights of his exhibition.  After the meal he would clean the dishes and stack them inside a plywood cabinet, creating remnants of an ephemeral performance. Esther Horchner is an illustrator whose clever teacups depict bathing figures.  Cheryl Pope incorporates dinnerware and other objects in unexpected ways.  Her Balancing Stacks, for instance, was a performance where a woman stacked dishes on a precariously balanced table.  Like the feminization of a ritual like clearing or setting the table, Pope uses her stacks as a symbol for something destined to collapse.

Each of these artists finds symbolic or artistic value in the typically utilitarian objects.  Using these almost universally recognizable items for art and performance enables a kind of storytelling or metaphor that is unique to each artist.

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Someone Released 1.5 Million Balloons Into The Sky And Ruined Everything

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If you’ve ever loosed a balloon into the sky, by accident or on purpose, you have probably had that uncanny feeling that you’ve done something simple but irreversible; no matter how high you jump, the balloon will forever be out of your grasp. Now multiply that sensation by 1.5 million; twenty-eight years ago, in a misguided attempt to break the record for most launched balloons in history, the United Way of Cleveland released one and a half million balloons into the sky for a fundraiser known as Balloonfest ’86. As the weather grew grim, the hasty event administrators freed the eager helium-filled balls of color into the sky, and it was all caught on film by the photographer Thom Sheridan.

The images are pretty remarkable; when shot at close range, the balloons look to be raining from above, coloring the skyline and bridges like jimmies over an ice cream sundae. Pink, red, blue, and yellow litter the frame like large-scale confetti. But viewed from further away, the balloons form something resembling an angry plague of locusts that ominously mushroom above the city. They puff up and away, and their colors blur, forming a bloody wound across the sky.

Given the historical context, these photographs are even more theatrical, grim and tragic. Two people died as a result of the event, and a horse was badly spooked and injured. The winds that day caused the balloons to flood together, forming a substantial cloud that obscured the view of aircrafts; helicopters were unable to rescue the victims of a boating accident. In one terrible anecdote, a coast guard member explained searching for the heads of the drowning people and being totally unable to differentiate them from balloons. The entire city remained littered for weeks.

This strange, tragic story reads like a bizarre little fable where excess, pride and even the most well-intentioned aspirations breed disaster and ruin. These photographs, these astounding relics of a city’s hopes and traumas, say it all.  (via Gizmodo and Viral Forest)

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