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Stereoscopic GIFS Create 3D Illusion

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These GIFS from David Alexander Slaager, otherwise known as General Dikki, will mess with your eyes (and possibly give you a headache if you don’t quit staring at them).  The GIFs use a technique called stereoscopy.  Stereoscopic images create the illusion of depth by presenting two images that are very slightly different from each other.  Each image is presented to each eye and the brain combines the two images to create a single image that seems three dimensional.  Slaagers GIFs quickly alternate between these two images nearly creating the same three dimensional effect.

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Natural gas commercial by Lovo Films

It seems Los Angeles has finally decided to warm up to us and the heat is slowly but surely attacking our foggy lovable city. I was trying to find something to post here that would welcome the heat wave back in LA after months of rain and freezing cold nights. Although this commercial is obviously targeting the concept of using natural gas in “winter”, I feel like if I could describe the heat in LA right now, would be a wool covered house.

The commercial is made by Lovo Films, a company that operates in Europe. They are known for making great commercials for companies like Belgacom, Coca-Cola, Telenet, Yamaha, TDK, Mio, McDonald’s, Gordon Beer, Center Parcs, Renault and Seat. They also have a “making of video” of this awesome commercial.

Now get ready to welcome the heat of Los Angeles with open arms~! HA!

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Baroque Frames And Adornments Carved From Cardboard

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The artwork of Jillian Salik offers up understated surprises.  Her new exhibit DUEL TINT features frames, window dressing, and other wall fixtures adorned with baroque ornamentation.  However, the typically gilded and gaudy colors that typically accompany such adornments, the reflections and windows that should fit in such frames were no where to be seen.  Salik only offers the bare structure of the frames and ornamentation.  Also, Salik makes an interesting choice of material: cardboard.  She contrasts high-society trimmings and embellishments with a decidedly “low” material and digital production processes.

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Art Dubai/Sharjah Biennial: Day 4

 

Art Dubai Opens today but I had a chance to sneak in yesterday and take some shots before the masses stormed the fair. As a result I don’t have the names of all the artists/galleries but there’s still some good eye candy.

 

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The Subliminal Messages and Minotaurs of Gabrielle Bakker

Gabrielle Bakker is hands-down one of the most skilled painters working today. Formally trained at Yale University, Bakker has the ability to not just reference the great masters of the 19th and 20th Centuries, but also reinterpret their visions through her own unique filter of execution — all while hiding subliminal messages and symbols into each and every painting she creates. You don’t have to look closely at Gabrielle’s paintings, but you’ll want to, since Gabrielle is herself a master of not only skill, but subtext.

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Brian Hunter

Brian Hunter

So this week I’m looking around to buy a new mattress, and it got me thinking about these pieces I saw a little while back by Canadian Brian Hunter. The images he renders fit the tone of the paintings so well, and I don’t think I’ve ever seen materials better suited for their subject matter. It’s always exciting when I encounter something I’ve never seen before that seems so completely obvious. The sleeping bag idea is simply genius!

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Nicholas Calcott


What happened to this house? Nicholas Calcott documents personal artifacts and the relationships we might develop with them as a means to remember the owners…

 

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Shawn Smith’s Pixelated Sculptures

Shawn Smith’s sculptures investigate the slippery intersection between the digital world and reality. Specifically Shawn is interested in how we experience nature through technology. When we see images of nature on TV or on a computer screen, we feel that we are seeing nature but we are really only seeing patterns of pixilated light.

For the past few years, Smith has been creating a series of “Re-things.” These whimsical sculptures represent pixilated animals and objects of nature. Finding images of his subjects online,  he creates three-dimensional sculptural representations of these two-dimensional images.  By building his “Re-things” pixel by pixel Shawn hopes to understand how each pixel plays a crucial role in the identity of an object. Through the process of pixilation, color is distilled, some bits of information are lost, and the form is abstracted. Making the intangible tangible, Smith views his building process as an experiment in alchemy, using man-made composite and recycled materials to represent natural forms.

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