Get Social:

Finders Keepers, curated by An Hoang for Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA

BLAZE LAMPER, Autumn Sass, 2012, Graphite on paper, 12 x 9 inches

JUSTIN VALDES, Lookout B!, 2010, Pencil and ink on paper, 8 ½ x 10 ¼ inches

Finders Keepers, a group exhibition curated by An Hoang including Joseph Hart, Todd Knopke, Blaze Lamper, Andy Ness, and Justin Valdes featuring drawings, collages, and photographic prints. This show brings together artists who engage in a creative process which allows for discovery through the act of making. What is found by the artists remains to be discovered by the viewer. Whether it is an edge, a gesture or the way the figure is revealed, all the works provide for the experience of uncovering the hidden.

Joseph Hart’s works on paper examine compositional tension through an elegant balance of spontaneous and deliberate marks, heavy and delicate forms, and subtle gestures confined by thick layers of graphite. The detailed, constructed fabric pieces and photographic prints by

Todd Knopke, incorporate the textures, patterns and seams inherent in the material to form dreamlike compositions which transcend the original story of the clothing. Blaze Lamper’s enigmatic graphite drawings feature mysterious figures whose faces remain veiled while in plain sight. The watercolors and pencil drawings by Andy Ness explore personal themes of searching and wandering using recurring imagery of ships, airplanes, teeth, and the reconstructed body to form newly defined narratives. Incorporating airbrush, acrylic and pencil, the still-life drawings by Justin Valdes investigate the relationship between object and frame.

Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA presents Finders KeepersTSA is a new Bushwick gallery located at 44 Stewart Avenue, #49 Brooklyn, NY, 11237.
On view from November 16, 2012 – January 6, 2013. Opening: Friday, November 16, 7-10PM.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jill Greenberg

Screen shot 2010-08-18 at 10.54.03 AM

You may recognize photographer Jill Greenberg‘s series of upset (understatement for some…) children. If you haven’t seen her work before, you may notice the off-putting style through her contradicting use of detail microscopically real vs. the sense of waxy – plastic feel. This is because Jill Greenberg is that same photographer behind the advertisements of the TV show Dexter. Check out her Fine Art photography, the ideas that inspire her, and the solution she comes to for translating the concepts are a real treat.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Alluring Bridal Photography Gorgeously Crushes Marital Norms

2014-07-30-KimikoYoshidaTheBridewithCrownofThornsCrossH.Stern2008courtseyM.I.AGallery

The Bride With Crown Of Thorns & Cross, 2008

2014-07-30-KimikoYoshidaTheBlueYorubaBrideNigeria2005courtesyM.I.AGallery

The Blue Yoruba Bride, Nigeria, 2005

2014-07-30-KimikoYoshidaTheMaoBrideRedGuardBlueholdingtheLittleRedBook2010courtesyM.I.AGallery

The Mao Bride (Red Guard Blue holding the Little Red Book), 2010

2014-07-30-KimikoYoshidaTheToreroBridewithablackSuitofLightsrememberingPicasso.2006courtesyM.I.AGallery

The Torero Bride With A Black Suit Of Lights, remembering Picasso, 2006

While we can probably all imagine what typical bridal photography looks like (maybe you’ve even been apart of it), artist Kimiko Yoshida turns this martial norm on its head. Her series Something Blue is named for the antiquated 19th century axiom that a bride should have “Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, and Something Blue” on her wedding day. The portraits feature Yoshida in various costumes that are tinged with the hue, but not how you’d expect. They look like high-fashion photographs that feature elaborate headdresses, mirrors, and even a black-light suit.

These subversive images are a form of role playing for the artist as she disconnects herself through them. The M.I.A. Gallery in Seattle, who’s currently displaying Yoshida’s work, describes it as:

…she [Yoshida] borrows an identity, tells a new story and plunges the viewer into a ceremony, where the bride keeps appearing and disappearing unexpectedly. The artist recaptures time, transfigures herself into queens, muses, warriors, and uses the shadow to illuminate the mystery and hybrid nature her ceremonial attires.

Using monochromatic, as the gallery observed, has the effect of disappearance. Yoshida is here but she’s not, showing us that when we’re painted in only one color, we become a symbol rather than person.

You can view Something Blue at the M.I.A. Gallery until August 30th of this year. (Via Huffington Post)

Currently Trending

Steve Kim

 

Am I crazy or are  Steve Kim’s ghostly figurative paintings look like a mix between Egon Schiele, and Richard Diebenkorn’s  paintings?

 

Currently Trending

Alex Garant Adds a Twist on Traditional Portraits Of Women With Multiple Eyes

1alex-garant-3

1alex-garant-2

1alex-garant-5

1alex-garant-9

Artist Alex Garant paints dizzying works of women that have multiple eyes and are seen in double vision. The traditionally-styled oil paintings are a unique take on the standard portrait, as they combine optical-illusions, realistic renderings, and repeat patterns. This offers a graphic element to her compositions where the background and foregrounds fuse to flatten the entire thing.

Garant finds inspiration in early ink printing, vintage pop surrealism, baroque tapestries, and retro kitsch. So, it’s no surprise that we see these patterns edging on and covering the faces of these subjects.

According to the artist’s website, she uses “patterns, duplication of elements,  symmetry and image superposition as a way to engage the viewer into her imagery.” The standard, front-facing portraits are made unique with offset facial features and a clash of visual cultures throughout time. (Via L’ACTE GRATUIT)

Currently Trending

psychedelic Bart

 

Time to take a break from the daily grind and dive into your inner consciousness. Courtesy of Bart Simpson and  A Teacup Of Seizures.

Currently Trending

Michael Wolf’s Copy Artists

Michael Wolf’s photographs of Chinese copy artists is absolutely brilliant. I’ve always heard stories about how you can get anything copied in China for dirt cheap but  this series absolutely blows me away. I love the tiled alleys that the photos are taken in and the casual nature of the copycats. For instance check out the water flowing towards the painting in the above image. What if that really was the Mona Lisa? Can you imagine someone dragging it into the alley into a puddle for a quick photo op?

Currently Trending

Mike Lay’s Native Pixies

Mike Lay’s drawings are a tripped out mix of native american pixies, mythological beasts, and hipster fashionista vampires. His work is delicate, detailed, psychedelic, and tips its hat at death metal imagery all at once.

Currently Trending