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Jason Freeny’s Dissected Pop Culture Sculptures

Jason Freeny lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He has an ongoing series of sculptures that eschew the clean and safe demeanor of mainstream toys. From Barbie to Lego Figures, Freeny’s creations are dissected so that individual anatomy can be seen. The kitsch cuteness of a My Little Pony figure is immediately eradicated once the viewer takes in the bizarre skeletal structure on the opposite side. Jason finds a way to expose inherent creepiness in otherwise harmless characters that populate the pop culture landscape.

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Satan’s Fashion By Valerija Ilchuk

Fashion Collages with a dark twist by Valerija Ilchuk.

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Julien Simshäuser

Julien Simshäuser

 

Horray for student work! Julien Simshäuser, “Born 24.12.1988 in Pertuis, France” and studying at the Bauhaus-University Weimar, likes to draw. And then stamp on top of it. And make awesome infographical (not a word, but it is now) booklets, as well as exciting new album covers. Won’t you take a look?

 

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Only 5 Copies Left of Book 1!

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Across the great lands, in all of eternity, against time, space, and even in the third dimension, there are only FIVE, I repeat FIVE copies of Book 1 left in existence. Or at least, left on the online shop. If you missed out on Book 1: Supernaturalism, with its custom sticker inserts, 164 pages of glossy art, and hand-drawn, collectable cover by Kyle Thomas, I suggest you run (or arrive, in a cloak of smoke and lightening) to the B/D Online Shop to get your copy. And, if you never want to miss another issue (and support independent art at the same time) subscribe!

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How A T-shirt By OMOCAT Made Us Question Sex And Controversy In Art

Omocat Shota Shirt

Omocat Shota Shirt

Omocat comic 1

Omocat comic 2

What’s in a word?  That’s what the prolific and internationally known Asian-American artist Omocat has been faced with lately.  In the midst of her recent “shota” t-shirt release (pictured here), the artist’s intentions have in instances been taken widely out of context.  Embraced by Japanese fans that understand the context, some others have used it as a brutal platform for Western backlash.  In this instance something got lost in translation between hemispheres, and it is increasingly important that we explore the context and origin of the Japanese word shota and, above all, what this illustrates about western views on sexuality and gender.

Omocat’s continuum of work includes illustration, comic-books, clothing and merch with her designs.  Her imagery and content is often based on shota (which loosely translates to mean “pretty boy”) or loli (an expansive style and sometimes fetish originating in Nabakov’s Lolita). All of these artistic expressions stem from Otaku, an umbrella term for the Japanese manga-centric subculture that also informs the work of artist Takashi Murakami.   It is important to note that Omocat is quite vocal and literal within the work on her feelings towards social justice and self-empowerment in gender and sexual identity, with a strong personal stance against bullying.  This is illustrated fully in her comic “Pretty Boy,” featured here.   Omocat is even working on a collaborative artistic effort against bullying set to launch later this fall.

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Dan Kopp

Juicy fluid paintings by Dan Kopp currently on view at Bryan Miller Gallery in Houston Texas.

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Thad Kellstadt’s Tit Mullet

Thad Kellstadt‘s acrylic paintings possess a sort of hipster-esque aesthetic.  I find his Tit Mullet (as seen above) in particular to be very amusing. Girl is stylin’!

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Melissa Brown’s Cave View

Nestled around a fire, inside a cozy cave, the first painter picked up some charcoal and drew a Mastodon.  The Cave is also the place where Plato described the world unenlightened people view as “shadows of the images the fire throws” against the back wall.  Courbet painted his cavern, The Source of the Loue, with an oarsman like the mythical Charon, ferrying people across the river Styx for a coin.  Caves are mysterious places, tied into our deepest roots: metaphors for our experiences, fears, and knowledge.  Melissa Brown, who we did a studio visit with a few months ago, has been working with an interesting group of printmakers at Random Number.  She has a new silkscreen out – Cave View.  Check, it, out.

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