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Dimitri Kozyrev Paints Disrupted Landscapes To Critique The Edges Of Art And War


Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev - Painting

Dimitri Kozyrev’s paintings are captivating, to say the least. His color precision from plane to line and surface to sky balances the ephemerally abstract beautifully with a hardened environment. This compositional fracturing feels like ice cracking on the pond, disrupting the reflection or illusion of us and our structures, before we crash into a new reality.

This “crash” echoes of Constructivism or Futurism, with deep contemporary critique on not just the disruption of landscape during wartime, but maybe even more so, the distortion of self, identity, and technology in relation to art and activism as these terms relate to the avant-garde, painting, and intention in today’s milieu.

On this note, Kozyrev elaborates:

“I have titled this body of work ‘Lost Edge.’ I use the word ‘edge’ because I draw a comparison between the notion of the avant-garde in war and the art world. In the early 20th Century, the avant-garde was at the height of its importance in both realms. Now, however, I maintain that just as the concept of the military avant-garde has been “lost,” because of changes in methods of warfare, the avant-garde in the contemporary art world, has also lost its edge.

“The source material for this body of work is images of ruins of the once mighty fortifications of the Mannerhiem Line, built to protect Finland from the advances of the Soviet military avant-garde. Finland’s attempt was valiant and not in vain; this war and the lives that were lost in 1939 are largely forgotten. The fortification lie in ruins, and nature is slowly reclaiming them. Similarly, the ‘cutting edge’ of the contemporary art world seems to have become blunted. Viewers of the avant-garde work of many visionary artists of the early 20th Century were shocked, challenged and inspired by The Malevich’s ‘Black Square’ and ‘Fountain’ of Marcel Duchamp. Because of changes in society, like changes in warfare, it has become difficult for today’s contemporary artist to generate the same level of response without resorting to vulgarity.”

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max-o-matic

Don't Panic Media - Heroes Issue : max-o-matic

Don't Panic Media - Heroes Issue : max-o-matic

In his portfolio, describing the above piece,’max’ explains, “My heroes are the heroes of socialism, Marx and Engels. And, as all heroes, they are there to protect us from chaos. And, as all heroes do, they fail.”

Illustrator, graphic designer, artist, Max-O-Matic, from Barcelona, seems to take his work as seriously as honest, heartfelt parody. You’re sure to find a little cynicism and humor in his mixed media projects, wherever they may be viewed, in editorials, on skateboards, or in sculpture. check out how he uses illustration and collage…

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Craig Redman

TheSkyIsBlack

A man of many talents, Craig Redman is a New York based illustrator, typographer, pattern artist, installation artist, sculptor, animator, designer, and art director. A list worthy of comparison would be his equally long list of well-known clients, such as, MTV, Louis Vuitton, Nike, Apple, Vogue, Converse, and The New York Times. And this may be overkill, but Craig not only has exhibited in various parts of the world, but he also exhibited at the Louvre, Paris (every artist’s dream!)

While we have many reasons to envy Craig Redman, we can also take solace in the fact that all of his accomplishments are well deserved. Craig’s diverse talents are immediately visible in his vibrant, smart, and secretly optimistic work.

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Albert Folch

Albert Folch

Albert Folch is a young artist based in Barcelona, Spain. Folch has established himself as a freelance designer with his own studio, his efforts are focused on editorial, book catalog and magazine design. Its difficult not to be amazed by the quality and quantity of his work. How many of us are that good that often?

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Sarah Small’s Disassociated Characters

Sarah Small’s The Delirium Constructions series is an ongoing body of work exploring disassociated themes and characters brought together into the same space. Small brings models into improbable, close interactions to examine the social and graphic contrasts of youth and experience, hysteria and discipline, tragedy and hilarity, and sexuality and desexualization.

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Overunder Wheatpastes Graffiti Or Does he Graffiti Wheatpastes?

At first glance I thought these clever byomorphic and hybrid characters by Overunder were painted directly on the wall but upon closer inspection I realized that these pieces were painted in the artists studio with spray paint on paper and then cut out as giant posters. Although this isn’t a completely unique idea Overunder does a great job of creating a Trompe-l’œil effect with this technique giving his pieces a spontaneous feel while still being labored over and well planned in the comfort of his studio. I’ve posted some images of his work in a gallery setting after the jump so you can see how they are cut.

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Timothy Buwalda’s Smashed Cars As a Metaphor for Painting

 Smashed car crash paintings by Timothy Buwalda.

“My paintings deal with both the formal aspects of painting and the concept of the imagery.  I always want them to reference each other. How the painting is built and previous layers discarded is similar to how the cars are crashed and need to be fixed or left in their state. This can be broadened to speak to the choices we make at every moment, and the quiet consequences that are left.”

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Bill Durgin’s Nude Figurative Abstractions

New York artist Bill Durgin’s photographs reflect a fascination with the body as form. The complex figurations, undulating arrangements of flesh, as the body seems to collapse onto it self, image an almost abstracted figure lacking appendages and hair. The physical structure becomes not just a shell, but a moving sculpture of skin, muscle, fat, and bone.

The gesture within each photograph is created through exploring his own physical limitations and collaborative improvisation with dancers and performers. Often Durgin will come up with a pose and demonstrate it and then ask the model to repeat or respond to it. Each pose transmogrifies the figure towards abstraction; exaggerating or diminishing the skeletal structure until it approaches an amorphic form. Durgin wants the bodies to be recognized as bodies, but also to be detached from common perceptions of the figure. Bound within each singular view, the uncanny figures convey the body as both abject and marvelous.

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