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Brandon Jan Blommaert

Experience the geometrically pleasing sensation that is Brandon Jan Blommaert’s gif images. His new collection of moving imagery is not only stunning but hypnotic, too. I just lost 10 minutes of work!

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Sergei Bobkov’s Wood Chip Sculptures

53 year old Russian sculptor Sergei Bobkov makes magic out of basic wood shavings creating all of our favorite animals out the material that most sculptors toss out with the trash. His process begins by creating hundreds of Cedar wood chips, each 2-3 inches long.Each wood chip is then hand carved into the appropriate shape per sculpture. This grueling process can take 10-12 hours a day for up to 6 months to complete just one piece.  (via readactor)

 

 

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WET PAINT GRANT RECIPIENT: Clark Goolsby

To call Clark Goolsby a multi-media artist almost seems like an understatement. Indeed, the sheer volume of materials and techniques he expertly employs is staggering, often combining spray paint, acrylics, pencil, wood, foam, plastic, string, and even audio into one finished product – but even that far from represents the impressive span of Goolsby’s “multi-ness.” He seamlessly transitions between different styles, from abstracted, multifaceted geometric forms to realistically rendered objects, crisp lines to more impressionistic strokes and drippings. As if that wasn’t enough, Goolsby tackles a seemingly endless mix of iconography, juxtaposing rainbows and antlers, inverted crosses and trophies, pyramids and statuesque faces. Oh, and by the way, it’s all in technicolor.

The result is just as overwhelming as you might imagine, and that’s exactly the point. Goolsby’s work parallels the milieu of stimuli we are constantly barraged with every day of our lives – a combination, he suggests, which poses a persistent, sometimes surprising threat to our survival. Goolsby’s most recent solo exhibition, Strange/Love at POVevolving Gallery in Los Angeles, focuses on “how we maintain optimism in a world that is so full of potentially life ending situations.” At the center of this exhibition, an 18 foot long skeletal form made of wood and foam entitled “Dead Man” lies horizontally, suspended from the ceiling by hundreds of neon-colored threads. Goolsby’s work reminds us that, even if we are all essentially dead men grasping onto life by the threads, at least those threads are bright, illustrating a sense of playful joie de vivre which urges us to live larger than life, finding beauty in the unrelenting stream of chaos while we still can.

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Jessica Hische font release!

Announcement! Beautiful/Decay friend Jessica Hische‘s first font, entitled Buttermilk, is now on sale at myfonts.com. The font is good for “magazine headlines, book title type, initial caps, holiday cards, wedding invitations, you name it.” In related news, a shirt Jessica designed for B/D Apparel will be coming out soon!

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Roxanne Jackson

Roxanne Jackson Ceramic Sculpture

Roxanne Jackson creates some fantastically creepy ceramic work.

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Victoria Reynolds’ Scary Paintings of Meat

 

 

It’s obvious that Victoria Reynolds is a skilled artist, but I personally don’t really see why anyone would want one of her paintings in their home or collection. They are scary and seem to promote a kind of negative energy that only a butcher or serial killer could be attracted to. But then again maybe that’s what she’s going for – that niche market of rich collectors who also have rooms full of dead bodies and future victims. (via)

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Tongue In Cheek: A Photo Series Of Couples French Kissing

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Ever wonder what it actually looks like when you’re making out – really going at it – tongue and all? One photographer took it upon himself to shoot couples doing just that. Often tongue on tongue action can be kind of grotesque, and rarely are we given the chance to examine it closely. Participating is always a good time, but witnessing from a relatively objective perspective – as someone not really invested – is kind of odd, and definitely uncomfortable if you linger too long watching. In film, if you’re lucky, you see a big juicy tongue slide its way in between hungry lips, but just for a second then it’s gone. Whether in public or in document, it’s hard to get up close and personal with a kiss when you’re not one of the ones doing it.

Rankin, a publisher, director, and commercial photographer living in London, set out for closer inspection of the French kiss in his series Snog. The most compelling of the images is one where you barely see the faces of the couple, just a hint of nose, some stubble around the mouth, and some foundation overtop the occasional blemish. You can feel the intensity of the kiss, as one lip lifts the other to reveal a bit of tooth, and the tong in front veers right as the other presses against it.

What Rankin achieves that others don’t is a balance between staging and reality. He maintains an appealing aesthetic while still staying true to the sentiment of french kissing. The funniest is the older couple both staring back at the camera. It looks on the one hand totally unnatural, but then it also seems to be something so appropriate for the character of the couple. It looks like their tongues are holding hands. (via Feature Shoot)

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Evan Nesbit At Ever Gold

Evan Nesbit lives and works in Nevada City, CA. He has just opened his first solo exhibition with Ever Gold San Francisco entitled Light Farming / Heavy Gardening. From the press release: “A recent graduate of the Yale MFA program, Nesbit’s recent body of work includes mixed media paintings, perceptual objects, sculpture and interactive “space blankets”. Through exploration of painterly materials, visual process and participation from the public, this new body of work will explore the imbrication of patterns and experience that structures ones vision, suspended in doubt, sometimes cured in paint. Through the use of constructed “space blankets”, Nesbit challenges the viewer to interact with this exploration by taking refuge beneath their comfort, only to be immersed in the stereoscopic images produced by pin hole camera effects.” The exhibition is on view through April 26th.

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