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Zheng Lu’s Poetic Steel Splashes Of Water Frozen In Mid Air

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Metal splashes of water twirling around space. Chinese artist Zheng Lu is suspending his favorite element in the air. He is also imprinting calligraphy letters onto the body of the sculptures for an extraordinary result.

The artist uses a plaster base to carve the shape of the spatters. He laser-cuts the thousand letters on the stainless-steel metal and and heats up the whole structure. This process allows the metal to be distorted and the different parts to be assembled. The rendering are 3 dimensional large-scaled water splashes with intricate traditional calligraphy Chinese letters spread out onto the surface.

Zheng Lu has been fascinated with water explosion since little. And he was introduced during his upbringing to the art of calligraphy. He has been nourishing his passions through his art since he was able to make art.
The spatters are extremely detailed. From the voluptuous circular shapes to the micro drops of water, the artist depicts water as close to reality as possible. The sculptures can either be suspended or laid on the floor.

The artist’s pieces are esthetically beautiful. They also are telling a story. The letters he is depicting onto the sculptures are texts inspired by literature and poems. The world of art of Zheng Lu is synonym of harmony. It’s a world where movement and stillness are contrasting concepts yet one cannot survive without the other.

Zheng Lu’s pieces were recently displayed at the Sundaram Tagore Gallery in New York. (Via Fubiz).

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Nature Front and Center- Bigfoot One

Collab w/ Skinner

What’s been going on lately in the world of Cali artist Bigfoot One?

As always, Bigfoot’s combination aesthetic of classic heavy metal, graffiti, and Nature is looking pretty, pretty, pretty good. Vinyl toys, walls, prints; so solid. Completely comfortable in his obsessions, Bigfoot returns again and again to his subject matter, to his lonely, knowing forest creature. Even in thorough repetition, the work packs a punch with each newly minted piece in whatever medium the artist chooses to employ. That’s a sign that there’s a basic truth at work here. What the truth is, like Bigfoot himself, is kind of an enigma.

Keep in eye out for a new release from Bigfoot and Kidrobot in the near future and also check out Issue:B of Beautiful/Decay with features one of the very first interviews with Bigfoot before he became the mysterious giant of street art.

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Laurent Chehere’s Flying Houses In Paris Suburbs

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Even in his commercial work French photographer Laurent Chehere clearly has a creative and curious eye for his surroundings.  An avid traveler, Chehere enjoys exploring the cities he visits.  This becomes especially evident in his series Flying Houses.  The series contains a number of photographs of floating buildings.  The buildings seem otherwise ordinary, perhaps tethered by power lines, quietly floating in the sky.  Chehere achieved the effect by taking photographs of buildings throughout the suburbs of Paris and digitally manipulating them.  A gallery statement  (translated from French) from a recent solo exhibit explains Chehere’s inspiration for the series:

“The artist isolates buildings from their urban context and frees them from their stifling environment. Houses fly in the clouds, like kites. Inspired by a poetic vision of old Paris and the famous short film The Red Balloon by Albert Lamorisse, Laurent Chéhère walked the districts of Belleville and Ménilmontant gazing at their typical houses. The images of the artist seize an unexpected levitation: held to the ground by unseen hands, like so many balloons used by the boy, these old buildings floating in the sky, sliding on the surface, they reveal to us their hidden beauty. Some houses are adorned with drying laundry or flower pots, outweigh other brands and shops fleeing the flames of a fire … All seem to find a second life. Uprooted from their hometown, they go to new heights. It’s a true invitation to travel and metaphor for the transience of the world, Flying Houses Laurent Chéhère’s series plunges us into a dreamlike and changing world full of gaiety and humor.”

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Kenya Hara’s Architecture For Dogs

If you think your dog sweaters or home cooked dog food doesn’t quite express the extravagant love you have for your dog, you might want to take a note from Kenya Hara designing and building a house specific to their size and aesthetics. Hara is a japanese art director, designer, and architect who commissioned eleven architects from around the world to design tiny structures based on the personalities of individual dogs. I love these. Partially because it’s reminiscent of the fact that humans effectively designed all these dog breeds themselves, but mostly because it is always fun to see dogs’ complete disinterest to things people have spent huge amounts of time designing for them, like presenting newborn babies with the socks you crocheted for their feet–just having no idea what caring even is, much less to care about whatever this thing on or around you. Yet the elegant maze does seem Papillon-esque and the geometric dome like a neurotic pug.  Tons more day-makers after the jump. (via)

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Lori Field’s Forest Stories

Lori Field’s paintings depict a world where animals and humans live together in enchanted forests filled with two headed skeleton kittens, Tiger gooe head cows, and baby ram angels.

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Grizzly Bear Video

Sean Pecknold aka Granchildren recently sent me this lovely video he did for the song “While You Wait for the Others” by Grizzly Bear, an interesting trip through a theater of the absurd, and as the title implies, seems to loosely be based around ideas of the passage of time.

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Rose-Lynn Fisher’s Microscopic Landscapes Made Out Of Tears

Onion tears

Onion tears

Basal tears

Basal tears

Tears of change

Tears of change

Rose-Lynn Fisher – whose anatomical bee photographs we have previously featured – has recently completed a series of images she calls “The Topography of Tears” that represent a study of 100 types of tears photographed through a microscope. During a difficult time that yielded a copious amount of tears, Fisher began to wonder if her grief tears looked the same as onion tears when viewed under a microscope. Using her own and others’ tears, Fisher was able to create a varied landscape of tear structures, demonstrating the diversity to be found within tear types. Fisher’s images almost resemble aerial views, these tear structures fractally resonating with larger scale structures found in the world.

Fisher says, “Tears are the medium of our most primal language in moments as unrelenting as death, as basic as hunger, and as complex as a rite of passage. They are the evidence of our inner life overflowing its boundaries, spilling over into consciousness. Wordless and spontaneous, they release us to the possibility of realignment, reunion, catharsis: shedding tears, shedding old skin. It’s as though each one of our tears carries a microcosm of the collective human experience, like one drop of an ocean.” (via smithsonian mag)

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As One

This is one of the most visually pleasing videos I have seen in a long time. Creator Makoto Yabuki did a wonderful job making this beautifully psychedelic film.

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