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Goodbye, Monroe!

Monroe

Monroe Dinos-Kaufman has been with us for just a few short weeks here at the offices, but has helped us out immensely! Monroe is on the cusp of launching his super-star art career in the big apple! You can read his abundant contributions to the B/D blog here. While perusing various sentiments to impart upon you, like: “Have a great trip to NYC!” or “Keep up the great work!” I realized that a very, very special piece of poetic poetry I discovered on the internet entitled “Special Friend Poem” (©  Sharon Degraw) might do the trick:

Our acquaintance has been only a short time,
But our time spent is so gentle on my mind.
How is it that we become so full of certain people?
Like a ray of warm sunshine
that goes on and on
never to end….
Never wanting it to end!!
Feelings so full of warmth.
Smiles so easily crossing lips.
What a WONDERFUL ACQUAINTANCE!!!

Oh yeah! Bon Voyage Monroe and thanks again for all your help! (View some of his artwork after the jump!)

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Pradalphabet

Design partners M/M (Paris) put their spin on the alphabet for a collaboration with Prada, creating architectural black and white type where each letter is related to the others.  They will release 5 collectible shirts with different letters on the front and the Prada-M logo on the back.  Wear a different one each day and see what you can spell!

Now who will be first to make this into a font? More alphabet fun after the cut.

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Jake And Dinos Chapman Interview

Jake Chapman was born in Cheltenham and Dinos Chapman in London. Their father was a British art teacher and their mother an orthodox Greek Cypriot. They were brought up in Cheltenham but moved to Hastings where they attended a local comprehensive before attending the University of East London‘s Art college – then atGreengate House, Plaistow – and then enrolling at The Royal College of Art, when they worked as assistants to the artists Gilbert and George. They began their own collaboration in 1992. The brothers have often made pieces with plastic models or fibreglass mannequins of people. An early piece consisted of eighty-three scenes oftorture and disfigurement similar to those recorded by Francisco Goya in his series of etchingsDisasters of War (a work they later returned to) rendered into small three-dimensional plastic models. One of these was later turned into a life-size work, Great Deeds Against the Dead, shown along with Zygotic Acceleration, Biogenetic, De-Sublimated Libidinal Model (Enlarged x 1000) at the Sensation exhibition in 1997.

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Good Morning Monday

good morning monday

Is it me or is this gif by Mark Portillo a perfect way to start the week?

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Cathrine Ertmann Confronts Death With Her Powerful Photo Essay From the Morgue

Muscular stiffening begins between four and twelve hours after death. It starts in the neck and makes movement of the limbs impossible. When it reaches the scalp, it can make the dead body’s hair rise. Like goose bumps on the living.

Muscular stiffening begins between four and twelve hours after death. It starts in the neck and makes movement of the limbs impossible. When it reaches the scalp, it can make the dead body’s hair rise. Like goose bumps on the living.

 His breast isn’t moving. The cells in his body have carried out the last of their work, the mechanisms have come to a halt and he is now not going to get any older.

His breast isn’t moving. The cells in his body have carried out the last of their work, the mechanisms have come to a halt and he is now not going to get any older.

In the chapel of the Pathological Institute of Aarhus University Hospital, the dead are received. Here they are dressed in clothes, their hair is combed and they are laid in the coffin, before we can say our last goodbye to those we have lost.

In the chapel of the Pathological Institute of Aarhus University Hospital, the dead are received. Here they are dressed in clothes, their hair is combed and they are laid in the coffin, before we can say our last goodbye to those we have lost.

Here are lying women and men, girls and boys on ice, because they were careless, because they were unlucky, or because their time was come. This woman was found dead in her home. She has just been through an autopsy, which confirmed that she didn’t die the victim of a crime. Soon her body will be dressed and laid in the coffin.

Here are lying women and men, girls and boys on ice, because they were careless, because they were unlucky, or because their time was come. This woman was found dead in her home. She has just been through an autopsy, which confirmed that she didn’t die the victim of a crime. Soon her body will be dressed and laid in the coffin.

These photos of the dead are purposefully anonymous. In “About Dying” Danish photographer Catherine Ertmann was aiming for the universality of death rather than the stories of these particular dead. And that’s what makes this series so moving. In photographing the dead so intimately, bare of everything, including their life stories, she has made room for the viewer in the morgue—as observer and as deceased. Who doesn’t project themselves into the sewn torso, the half-clenched hand, the freckled cheek? Will it be the zipped bag or the fiery crematorium in the end? How can we live fully if we can’t look at death?

“This project tries to break down the taboo by showing something we rarely have access to, and that death can be both hard to look an but also beautiful. Just like when a new life comes into the world when a woman is giving birth. It deals with the incomprehensible fact that life ends and hopefully remind the audience that our time here is precious and what things really matter while we are here.”

This project was approved by Aarhus Universitets Hospital (University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark), where she and journalist Lise Hornung worked.

The only complete certainty in life is that one day we will die. It is the most certain thing in the world, and the biggest uncertainty we experience of the world, because nobody can say what will happen afterwards. Maybe that is why we find it so difficult to speak about death.

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Studio Visit: The Paintings Of David Hornung

David Hornung Lead Photo Web leaf 72dpi(revised) scene from an anomaly 72dpi
David Hornung makes paintings from both oil and gouache.  He paints quiet simple, small houses located in fenced fields, bucolic scenes of nature, solitary women and men, memento mori, snakes and birds, paths and walls.  Objects in his paintings seem to be a distillation of universal human experiences with the world and among each other.  Some objects are singled out as being important by a kind of twin cloud, the direction of light, or glowing patches of color.  The paintings are beautiful executions of color theory, which makes sense because David wrote the book on color theory “Color: A Workshop Approach.”  His subject matter hovers between observation and the symbolic, and he refers to Philip Guston’s Alphabet series with plain respect, and like Guston, David was reluctant to talk about image-based thinking.  We walked through Brooklyn on the way get some lunch, and David said that painting is hard to talk about because the ideas come out of working with images, that the process gives painters their ideas, which is a kind of reversal, because for most people who work with ideas – the ideas generate the process.

You can see David Hornung’s work at the John Davis Gallery in Hudson NY from May 23rd to June 16th.

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Anthony Jacobus Is A Mad Hatter

Anthony Jacobus’ photographs are visual poems of loss, mortality and isolation.

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Aaron Noble


Artist Profile: Aaron Noble from By Osmosis TV on Vimeo.

 

Beautiful/Decay has teamed up with By Osmosis TV once again to mix words with one of our favorite artists Aaron Noble. Aaron is a long time collaborator with Beautiful/Decay Magazine and Beautiful/Decay Apparel, and is featured in Beautiful/Decay’s AtoZ gallery show at the Kopeikin Gallery.

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