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Julia Sonmi Heglund

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Visual artist Sonmi Heglund revisits pop-culture creatures of the past and presents many new characters and stories of her own, in an intricate and graphic illustrative style. Dracula, Jiminy-Cricket, and weeping eyes… oh my!

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Scott Espeseth

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Scott Espeseth’s works draw from cartoons, children’s books, and the doodles we used to sketch into the margins of notebooks when we were supposed to be taking notes. (Who says memorizing the state capitals is more important that creative expression, anyways?)  Espeseth says he draws in order to get lost in a different space and time, often to reminisce. He favors a wide range of media that are “commonplace, overlooked, and sometimes obsolete,” from silverpoint to the humble ballpoint pen.

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Evan Robarts’ Sculptures Made From Mundane Objects

 

Evan Robarts lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His playful sculptures are constructed from found objects and industrial materials. Robarts reinvigorates everyday items like brooms, hockey sticks, and bicycle frames when he transforms them into vibrant compositions. In one piece the combination of cake sprinkles and plaster results in a dazzling abstraction that looks good enough to eat. Another body of work utilizes Popsicle sticks and ink to imitate a plane of freshly melted treats. Robarts’ zestful work triggers multiple senses and reminds us that exuberance can be found in all things.

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Monica Piloni’s Dark Humor Sculptures Of Skeletal Fruit

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Brazilian artist Monica Piloni creates sculptures of skeletal fruit. Her work consist of dissected papayas, figs, oranges, and peaches that’s innards expose each fruit’s meat to be structurally held together by a spine and rib simulated structure. The tiny fish-like skeletal structures within each piece of fruit is created from vinyl and acrylic. Though the pieces are indeed manmade, the delicate nature of the work truly provokes the viewer to second guess his or her knowledge of reality. Illusion as everyday object seems to be a common theme within Piloni’s work. Her sculptures mimic ordinary items and manipulate them into sculptural puns. For example, other pieces of hers play with a sort of post-modern fragility of the body, a literal “plastification” of the human form. For instance, one of her sculptures is a muscular body as a dining room chair. Another piece consists of what looks like a mass genocide of naked barbies. It seems, perhaps, that Piloni’s work aims to, with an air of dark humor, remind us of the underlying reality of our comforts. Do these pieces of skeletal fruit remind us to be mindful of our consumption? Do we even really truly think about where what we consume comes from? What it’s made of? What death and harm simple everyday products causes to those who don’t have the luxury to partake on the demand side of capitalism? Simultaneously fun and disturbing, Monica Piloni’s work is provocative and inquisitive. (via designboom)

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The Sad Reality of Things

Someone had to do it. Catherine Chalmers did it beautifully. Damn. Why are you keeping it so real?

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A Day In Decay: The Tampa Express

Dealing with the ups and downs of an independent business can at times be a drag, but getting packages like this in the mail makes all the work worthwhile. I first met Justin B. Nelson when he entered our contest with Colt45. Justin was one of the top ten finalists and his work was entered in our show at Synchronicity Gallery. I loved Justin’s work in the show but was blown away when I met him at the opening. At first I thought Justin had drove an hour or two, but he flew in all the way from Tampa, FL just to check out the show! If that’s not dedication I don’t know what is. Since then, Justin’s been part of the Cult of Decay. We’ve only met each other once but we probably email or send each other tweets at least once a week. It’s amazing to be able to connect with creative people without the restrictions of distance. (The internet kicks ass!)

Anyways back to the package… Yesterday our mailman brought us an envelope all the way from Tampa. it included not only a print of one of my favorite pieces in the Colt45 show but also a note from Justin. It might not seem like much but it’s a great feeling to get feedback like this. We get caught up in all the chaos of running the show and sometimes forget that YOU are out there reading our books, wearing our shirts, and spreading the good word of decay!  I’m glad that you guys are out there. Without your there would be no Beautiful/Decay.

P.S.  You can check out a larger image of Justin’s print after the jump along with his note. You can also get a copy of his sick print here.

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Sandra Beer’s Nostalgic Illustration

 

I really like these illustrations from Sandra Beer of Frankfurt, Germany. They somehow have a dirty and nostalgic feel all at once. If I encountered the animals and youngsters of Beer’s portfolio in the real world, I wouldn’t know whether to go in for the hug or run to safety. Where others may have tried for crowd pleasingly cuteness on some of her subjects, Beer’s not afraid to bring out the ink splotches and faded palette. Also, this aesthetic carries throughout all of her work, including the digital stuff. (via)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Todor & Petru


Boobs, fat dude guts, explosive animation, and super fast euro raps make for an interesting video.

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