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Magalie Guerin

Magalie Guerin

Montreal-born Magalie Guerin currently lives in Brooklyn, NY. With machine-like precision, she uses ballpoint ink on paper to create incredibly detailed pieces reminiscent of the visual texture of dollar bills. Her art reminds me of a cross between the elegance of Civil War portraits and the distortion of carnival funhouses.

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The Punctured Photographs of Daniele Buetti

Swiss artist Daniele Buetti’s light box constructions feature punctured holes that emit light from beneath the surface of the image creating a glowing highlight to the images of the distressed models and adding poetic text and musings to her provocative works.

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Laurie Lipton Draws Epic and Meticulous Fantastical Dystopian Worlds

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Los Angeles based artist Laurie Lipton draws fantastical worlds built of dystopian technology and waste. Her recent work, which she refers to as Techno Rococo, explores “society’s relationship to technology and how it’s uniting us while simultaneously disconnecting everyone from each other.” Her epic, painstakingly detailed drawings are giant, allowing the viewer to fully enter them — Lipton’s work is not just a vision, its an experience. Lipton explains her unique style; “it was all abstract and conceptual art when I attended university. My teachers told me that figurative art went ‘out’ in the Middle Ages and that I should express myself using form and shapes, but plashes on canvas and rocks on the floor bored me. I knew what I wanted: I wanted to create something no one has ever seen before, something that was brewing in the back on my brain.” Originally inspired by the Flemish School of painting, Lipton developed her drawing style based on traditional egg tempera techniques of creating depth through a meticulous process of cross hatching. Using only charcoal and pencil on paper, her black and white work, despite its futuristic content, aims to hint at a sense of classicism. She states, “I used to sit for hours in the library copying Durer, Memling, Van Eyck, Goya and Rembrandt. The photographer, Diane Arbus, was another of my inspirations. Her use of black and white hit me at the core of my Being. Black and white is the color of accent photographs and told TV shows…it is the color of ghosts, longing, time passing, memory, and madness. Black and white ached. I realized that it was perfect for the imagery in my work.” (via Hi Fructose)

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Do Ho Suh’s Cottage In The Sky

When Do Ho Suh first proposed “Fallen Star” to UC San Diego’s Stuart Collection, he “never thought it would be realized.” A cottage built from scratch and permanently joined to an existing campus building – several stories up in the air? Right, mm-hm.

“Fallen Star” is hard to miss. The 18th addition to the renowned collection of site-specific sculptures at UC San Diego is in a central campus location. It sits atop Jacobs Hall, also known as Engineering Building 1 – cantilevered at an angle from a corner of the seventh floor.

The house was built during the fall of 2011. On Nov. 15, it was gently hoisted 100 feet and then attached to Jacobs Hall.

It has since been furnished and accessorized. Its garden is growing: There’s a plum tree, a wisteria vine, tomatoes and more. Lights flicker on at night; a TV, too. And steam, simulating smoke, sometimes rises from the chimney.

To some, imagining Oz, it might look like a tornado-tossed interloper from Kansas. To others, more biologically minded, perhaps like a small blue creature living in symbiosis with its much larger host. Either way, it can be seen from multiple vantage points on campus and off. (Watch a video about the installation after the jump)

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Scott Dalton Photographs Of Mexican Faith Healers

Scott Dalton

faith healers

Scott Dalton

Scott Dalton, an award-winning photographer and filmmaker based in Houston, Texas documents the pilgrimage devoted to Mexican faith healer, Niño Fidencio, in Espinazo, Mexico.

Through the years in Mexican cultural history, Curanderos (Faith Healers) have served an important role in peoples’ medical and spiritual lives. In fact, many of these healers become celebrities, as their miraculous healing creates huge followings. In the early 20th century, El Niño Fidencio became one of the country’s most celebrated healers; today he is regarded as a folk saint by thousands of his devotees, or, as they call them, fidencistas.

In 2009, Dalton traveled to Espinazo to document the festivities devoted to El Niño Fidencio.

“What interested me in the project was just the idea of faith, and how it takes a variety of forms in peoples’ lives. This project just looks at one part of that, but I think it serves a reminder of how important faith is for so many people throughout the world, and how we all come to terms with our own belief system within the context of our own society and environment.”

Fidencistas believe that modern-day curanderos can channel the spirit of Fidencio; these photographs show many of the rituals provided by these modern day healers. To us this looks unusual, cinematic and surreal, but to them these ritualistic activities only mean their salvation. Dalton said he witnessed transformations, in which the eyes of curanderos would roll back and they’d assume a high-pitched voice- taking Fidencio’s spirit in order to heal. (via Slate)

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Kendal Murray’s Incredibly Miniature Nature Scenes Built On Top Of Household Objects

miniature sculptures

miniature sculptures

miniature sculptures

 

Kendal Murray - Sculpture

Kendal Murray makes miniature sculptures inventing various scenes with miniature characters, but whose stories are life sized. Scenes of families at the beach or sailing toy sailboats, and friends exploring a perilous landscape of wood clothes pegs are some of Murray’s creations. Her invented landscapes built atop compact mirrors, bowls, glass jars and teapots, and clutch purses exist somewhere between their own world and our own. Because they’re built on regular, albeit mildly nostalgic objects, the viewer is reminded of their existence in our own world, but they also seem to live in their own contained reality, ending at the limits of the object.

Some scenes are more absurd than others, like a woman standing proudly naked in front of a fully clothes man beside a fence. Another that’s particularly funny is one of a woman being chased by a swan while a man (who was presumably accompanying her) wanders through high reeds. Other scenes are more mundane, like a couple flossing and bathing in a bathroom together.

According to Ignant, the artist sees the miniature sculptures as an opportunity to explore identity. She says that dreams are where we’re able to experiment with different identities, and her sculptures are a manifestation of that possibility. (Via Ignant)

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Kevin Cyr

Supplying good quality products, serving people with all my heart.

"Supplying good quality products, serving people with all my heart."

New York artist Kevin Cyr finds beauty in derelict cars and unkempt landscapes. He has always been interested in painting vehicles and scenes that have defined the evolution of the American landscape. A lot of his work has to do with the commemoration of commercial and recreational vehicles barely the signs of over-usage. He enjoys finding the character of these old cars and giving them a portrait-like importance by removing them from their everyday context. I love the way he discusses certain issues with the present lifestyle we lead with a subtle touch of humor.

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Ashkan Honarvar

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Ashkan Honarvar’s work is definitely not for the squeamish. There is macabre beauty in his work that compels you to keep looking at it. Honarvar’s work reveals the the darker side of the human body and mind… something most of us would rather look away from. The human body, whether torn by war, exploited by the sex industry, or as a tool for discovering identity, is the focus of his work. Ashkan Honarvar is now part of the La Petite Mort Gallery in Ottawa, Canada.

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