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Dan Bradica’s Lansdcapes Altered With Paper And Lights

Dan Bradica lives and works in Chicago. Using extremely basic materials (paper and fluorescent lights) he obscures, highlights, and examines the world around him. An image of stacked cardboard boxes in a field of barren trees becomes a metaphor for the consequences of deforestation. In other work pieces of bright paper take form of apparitions and playfully haunt the scene. These simple alterations reinvigorate the landscape and simultaneously comment on waste, excess, and consumption.

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Joe Fig’s Incredible Miniature Sculptures Of Artists In Their Studios

joe fig sculpturejoe fig sculpture

joe fig sculpture

New York based painter and sculptor Joe Fig has been featured on our site many times before but I was surprised to find that we had never posted his gorgeous miniature diorama’s of artist studios. Joe Fig has meticulously sculpted everyones studios from contemporary artists such as Ryan Mcginness to everyones favorite Ab/Exer Jackson Pollock. Let’s all thank Mr.Fig for taking it upon himself to document and preserve the rarely seen artists workspace for all of us to snoop around and enjoy. (via)

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Stephen Ives’ Mr. Dictator Head

I’m absolutely loving this series of of dictator sculptures by Stephen Ives’ based on everyones favorite toy Mr. Potato Head! Saddam Hussain, Stalin, Kim Jong II, Lenin, and even Hitler call all be made with the removal and addition of a few pieces. Now you can have playtime and pretend to be an evil dictator all at once!  More dictators and other amazing sculptures based on toys after the jump!

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A Spectacular Concept Hotel Structured Like An Amethyst Geode

NL Architects, Amethyst Hotel - Architecture and Design NL Architects, Amethyst Hotel - Architecture and DesignNL Architects, Amethyst Hotel - Architecture and DesignNL Architects, Amethyst Hotel - Architecture and Design

The Amsterdam-based company NL Architects has proposed a beautiful and “slightly insane” project: a series of luxury hotels resembling amethyst geodes. The unique buildings would all vary slightly in their shapes, sizes, and forms, but their layout would be similar: hallways along the periphery (or shell) of the building that connect to rooms adjacent to the violet, crystalline center. The architects describe this project as “a mutation of the innovative hotel typology as developed by the architect and real-estate entrepreneur John Portman: hotel rooms lining a sensational void” (Source). Portman — who has designed hotels for Hyatt, Westin, and Marriott — is known for his high-rise buildings with interior atria. The Amethyst Hotel is similar in structure, only it has been bisected, thus revealing a spacious and awe-inspiring interior.

The goal of the Amethyst Hotel chain would not only be to produce structures of stunning (and arguably utopian) beauty, but to replicate and harness the well-known positive energies of the violet mineral. Deriving etymologically from an Ancient Greek word meaning “without drunkenness”, amethyst was thought to prevent intoxication. Today, it is still attributed with natural healing powers, and is believed to detoxify the body and mind, helping to cleanse the consciousness from “drunken” (delusional) thoughts. It is also seen as an aid in the treatment of stress, insomnia, depression, and anxiety. While the concept may seem somewhat idealistic and far-fetched, should these effects be simulated in the Amethyst Hotel, NL Architects will have designed a space wherein the geodic form matches and manifests the building’s function: a hotel that fosters both “hospitality and well-being” (Source).

The first Amethyst Hotel would be located on China’s Ocean Flower, a man-made island currently in development. Check out NL Architect’s website for a slideshow explaining their concept and goals for this project. (Via designboom).

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Sticky Situation: Blake Little’s Honey Covered Models Look As If They Are Frozen In Amber

Blake Little - photography

Blake Little - photography

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Celebrity photographer Blake Little has taken his love of portraiture to new heights. Pouring honey all over his models of different ages, races and genders, he has created a series of dramatic images that look like photos of wax models. While he normally snaps pictures of famous faces like Kevin Spacey, Tom Cruise, Glenn Close, Samuel L. Jackson, Jane Fonda, Gwyneth Paltrow, this time he placed a Craigslist ad asking for some not-so-familiar faces. Seeing over 90 people, all ranging in age from 2 – 85 years, he asked them to take their clothes off and get covered in a thick gooey layer of honey. Little talks about his process:

Preservation began through a process of experimenting with honey. Initially, I started shooting the way it pours and drips on just the face or specific areas of the body. After several sessions, it became clear that completely covering the figure as much as possible and with varying thicknesses created a quality that I had never seen before. The honey has a way of diffusing the personal qualities of the subjects, often making them unrecognizable and democratizing their individual traits into something altogether different and universal. (Source)

The result of the intense studio session is hypnotic. The models look like they have been frozen in amber, or resin, or caught in the volcanic eruption of Pompeii. All of the subjects in his new book Preservation look like they are in a deep slumber, and all have lost any idiosyncrasies they may have had. It seems like Little has compiled a reference of what is it to be human – a kind of catalog of frozen specimens where we can, in the future, look back and compare similarities and differences between us all.

His show accompanying his new monograph opens at Kopeikin Gallery in Culver City, CA from March 7.

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Lorenzo Nanni Silk Botany

Lorenzo Nanni uses silk  and embroidery to create incredibly detailed sculptures of underwater creatures and various forms of botany. Lorenzo also creates prosthetic jewelry that also takes on the natural and organic forms of his sculptures.

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Dennis Ekstedt’s City Grids

Dennis Eksted’s explosive cityscape paintings take our city streets rigid grid system of lights and transforms them into powerful abstract paitnings.

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Old Navy Causes A Stir With Insulting Anti-Artist T-Shirts

Old Navy, T-Shirts - Product Design Steve Ogden, T-Shirts - Product Design

Anyone who has ever pursued a liberal arts career has probably heard the opinion: that there’s no future in the arts, or at the very least, it’s going to be extremely difficult. While the latter is probably true (Rome wasn’t built in a day, and so on), the bias against the arts—often in favor of science and the trades—is highly prevalent in our public discourse.

Old Navy recently attracted some heat by releasing two “funny” toddler tees, both emblazoned with the “YOUNG ASPIRING ARTIST” motto, with “ARTIST” crossed out. Scrawled beneath are two alternative career paths: “Astronaut” and “President” (although, really, we don’t think these careers are any easier to attain). Twitter users voiced their offense, and soon after, artist Steve Ogden humorously modified the designs, overwriting “YOUNG ASPIRING OLD NAVY EXEC” with “ARTIST” and “HUMAN.” Here’s a response from the company, as published on artnet News:

“At Old Navy we take our responsibility to our customers seriously. We would never intentionally offend anyone, and we are sorry if that has been the case. Our toddler tees come in a variety of designs including tees that feature ballerinas, unicorns, trucks, and dinosaurs, and [they] include phrases like ‘Free Spirit.’ They are meant to appeal to a wide range of aspirations. With this particular tee, as a result of customer feedback, we have decided to discontinue the design and will work to remove the item from our stores.” (Source)

Overall, the initial designs and the subsequent outcry reminds us that we shouldn’t disparage our artists. For those who are determined, it is plausible to develop a career in such fields—and there is value in it. After all, who could live in a world without art? (Via artnet News)


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