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Andrew Sutherland

Luke Stephenson

Glue must be sculptor Andrew Sutherland’s best friend. Objects falling victim to its liquid strength are made from paper: New York Times’ made to look like a from cradle to grave stump of wood, cardboard cut out to create strange optical illusions, newspapers combined with thread and zippers for a lightweight sleeping bag.

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Time-Lapse Video Captures Graffiti Artist Put Up Over Twenty Pieces

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Graffiti artist Sofles is the subject of a new video from Selina Miles titled Infinite.  The video captures Sofles as he gets to work.  Through time-lapse Sofles is captured wandering through a huge building, perhaps an old school or warehouse.  He puts up pieces, tags, murals – over twenty throughout the video.  Sofles’ impressive work ranges in size from quick tags to huge rolled murals and styles that are similarly varied.  Be sure to check out the video Infinity after the jump.    [via]

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Tomás Saraceno Creates The Worlds Ultimate Moon Bounce

Argentinian artist and architect Tomás Saraceno is internationally known for his visionary and surprising installations accessible to the public and able to modify the perception of architectural spaces. His oeuvre, inspired by the tradition of 20th-century utopian architecture, stems from the desire to create aerial structures that can be inhabited by people, are self-sufficient and have a low environmental impact.

At Hangar Bicocca Saraceno creates On Space Time Foam, an incredible floating structure composed of three levels of clear film that can be accessed by the public, inspired by the cubical configuration of the exhibition space. Functioning as the ultimate moon bounce, Saraceno’s piece floats participants high above the ground creating a surreal (and frightening) experience that gives the feel of weightlessness and flight without the hassle of going off into space. The work, whose development took months of planning and experimentation with a multidisciplinary team of architects and engineers, will then continue as an important project during a residency of the artist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – MIT in Cambridge (MA). (via)

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Sculptural Portraits Made From The DNA Left On Your Trash

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Heather Dewey-Hagborg sculpture1

Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg‘s project, Stranger Visions, is a wonderful mix of science and art.  Dewey-Hagborg turns a poetic attention to the seemingly innocuous artifacts of life: a hair, chewed gum, a cigarette butt.  Beyond sight, though, the DNA remains of each unique person inhabits these “artifacts”.  She picks up these remains up throughout Brooklyn and brings them to a nearby biology lab.  Dewey-Hagborg extracts the DNA from the object, then information from the DNA.  She runs the information through a program she has written herself that is able to determine physical features such as eye color, hair color, gender, nose width, and so on.  That information is then exported to a 3D color printer to create a sculptural portrait of the unwitting donor.  [via]

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Dirty Beach TV

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If you’ve ever been to London and meandered along the Thames, chances are you’ve witnessed the Dirty Beach crew in action. But you don’t have to leave your seat to partake in the fun, nor to see what these purveyors of grainy sculptures are up to; just visit Dirty Beach tv… what more can I say… enjoy!

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Virginia Mori’s Dark, Surreal Illustrations Of Headless Women

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Italian illustrator Virginia Mori uses black ballpoint pen and pencil on paper to create strange, lady-centric compositions. The minimal drawings feature long-haired women in surreal situations. Heads are often seen severed or parts of the body are fused with furniture. Although they are weird, Mori’s work isn’t gruesome. Even when a umbrella handle is coming out of a character’s mouth, there’s no blood or guts. It’s simply a surreal scene.

Mori separates mind from body, in both literal and figurative ways. Heads are rolling, they exist on different levels, and are obstructed by hair. It represents the idea that we can “disconnect” our mental from our physical self, and that this separation can feel like two entities. But in Mori’s illustrations, what causes it? Mystics? Physical ailments? Lessons not learned? The sparse compositions allow for multiple interpretations.

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The Chaos And Disorder Of Hoarders

Paula Salischiker hoarders

hoarders photographs

Paula Salischiker hoarders photography

I have to admit that one of my guilty pleasures is watching an occasional episode or all day marathon of the tv show Hoarders. Maybe it’s the fact that seeing the chaos in someone else’s life makes me feel better about my own never ending laundry pile. I admit it’s not my finest moment but hey at least it’s not the Jersey Shore.

Given the above confession it should come as no surprise that I was immediately captivated by the series The Art Of Keeping by Argentinian photographer Paula Salishchiker. Since 2011 Salishchiker has been working on this fascinating project documenting the homes of hoarders in the UK. (via feature shoot)

I photograph the houses of people who have difficulty in throwing things away. Their objects help them feel safe, they take their time, they require their care and are there for them. However, they also make their lives difficult, sometimes forcing them out of their own homes, suffocating them with their never ending expansion. – Paula Salishchiker

 

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The Art Of Disappearing: Stefanie Klavens Documents Vanishing Drive-Ins

Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography Stefanie Klavens- Photography

Stefanie Klavens has a love for 20th century pop culture and Americana. In her articulate photographic series, titled “Vanishing Drive-Ins,” Klavens documents the disintegration of the American drive-in. Once a popular social and entertainment aspect, it has been slowly disappearing from the United States. As Klavens explains, “The drive-in has suffered the same fate as the single screen theater. Before World War II the drive-in was a modest trend, but after the war the craze began in earnest, peaking in popularity in the late 1950s and early 1960’s. Drive-ins were ideal for the modern family, everyone jumped into the car, no babysitter needed. ‘Car culture’ had officially arrived as a dominant force on the American scene.”

Despite the rapid popularity of the drive-in, they simply could not stand the test of time. Klavens attributes their decline to the evolution of technology and altered views of land: “Over time, changing real estate values began to have an effect on the drive-in. Land became too valuable for a summer-only business. Widespread adoption of daylight saving time in the mid 1960’s subtracted an hour from outdoor evening screening time. The decline was further hastened by the advent of VCRs and home video rentals. In the 1950s there were over 4,000 drive-ins nationwide. Today there are fewer than 400.”

These photographs, with their heavily saturated colors and blurry prolonged exposures, showcase some of the few drive-ins that are still functioning with a romantic nostalgia. The structures and signage may be antiquated, but the car types and models are a dead ringer for our era.

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