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Debbie Tea

Debbie Tea_01 Indonesia based artist Debbie Tea was a multi-media student, but she now chooses to express herself primarily through her camera. Her photographs, many of which she presents in series, are observations of a peculiar sort. She pulls together that which tends to reamain separate, and displays her subjects by playing with their absence.

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We Have Band- You Came Out

An amazing video for We Have Band‘s song “You Came Out” created from 4,816 still images! Not a single moment was used to make this mini masterpiece. If you don’t believe me just take a look at their Flickr page to view all the hi res images that were used to create the video. Directed by David Wilson in collaboration with Fabian Berglund and Ida Gronblom from Wieden + Kennedy.

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Pop of Colors Opens Tomorrow!

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Amir H. Fallah

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Beautiful/Decay’s own Creative Director Amir H. Fallah will be exhibiting new work, alongside artists Clark Goolsby, Jessalyn Haggenjos, Stella Lai, Jason Redwood, Mark Schoening and Mike Swaney, in POV Evolving‘s “Pop of Colors” show. The show is based around artists who use vibrant, Pop Art colors in a new way, either conceptually or as a decorative tool within their works. If you are not familiar with each of these artists, I’ve included an example of their work after the jump.  If you are in town this Friday, October 9th, from 6-10, be sure check out this  not-to-be-missed round up of LA’s best & brightest young artists! (And I really just ain’t sayin’ this ’cause Amir’s my boss- check out the works after the jump if you don’t believe me!)

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Social Decadence

Immortilized vapid party pictures of ridiculousness by Leah Tinari. Her exhibit opens at Mixed Greens this weekend.

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CANSON WET PAINT GRANT RECIPIENT: Raul Gonzalez

If Raul Gonzalez had a soundtrack to accompany his drawings, it would be a mash up of old Disney movie themes, Death Metal and Mariachi music. It’s a bizarre mix of badass and cute, (cute like a two-year old giving you the finger) all on color splotched and stained pages that make you feel like you’re getting a secret look into Gonzalez’s personal sketch book. You can imagine the free-association process that went into each image, each element building, as if at some point Gonzalez thinks to himself, ‘it would be rad if the chicken was coughing up a human tooth,’ or ‘this guy should have a beat up severed head in one hand and a flaming cigarette in the other.’ And what may look like stains or scribbles reveal themselves to be crucial compositional devices that contribute to the overall success of each illustration. Best of all is the playful freedom: while the characters are often beheaded, impaled, beaten, or in some state of peril, there is always an aspect of humor and joy. Even if it’s the kind of joy some of us got from frying an ant hill with a magnifying glass as kids. Gonzalez brings to mind some of most underappreciated cartoons to hit the glowing screens in American homes, shows like Ren & Stimpy, Beevis and Butthead, and even Itchy & Scratchy on The Simpsons. Shows that are so awesomely gross and hilariously violent they pull at the heart strings of those of us who liked to poke dead things with a stick.

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Powerfully Disturbing And Certainly Controversial Art By The Kid

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Powerfully disturbing, and certainly controversial, the art that 22-year old artist The Kid creates spans genres. He describes his work as “forever caught between innocence and corruption,” and the well-executed pieces are compelling with their huge, detailed, Bic pen-drawn faces and hyper-realistic sculpted bodies. Photos of his sculptures, made from materials such as platinum silicon, glass fiber, oil paint, human hair, cotton, and mixed fabrics, force you to look, and look again, in order to believe that they are, in fact, inanimate objects.

In his latest work, The Kid is influenced by bullying inflicted on him by fellow students and teachers when he was younger. The sculpture “Do you believe in God?” which depicts the artist kneeling and holding a gun in his own mouth, was in response to the Columbine killers, who he feels he understands and sees as “victims of a social context.”

“All subjects of my drawings for the exhibition “endgame” really exist and are currently being held in prison-even in the United States-with exactly these tattoos. They are not imaginary and no detail is invented. They are all serving life sentences without the possibility of parole, until they die in prison. There is no other hope for them-a life in adult prison at the beginning of their sentence, that’s all, even though they have been convicted of violent crimes they committed before the age of 18.” (Source)

It’s clear that The Kid empathizes with these stigmatized subjects and hopes to give them back some humanity by evoking compassion from the viewer. Many share his view that social determinism condemns people from birth because of their familial circumstances, but by depicting, in such a graphic way, a sampling of those who are affected, he brings attention to the issue. It’s not empty sentiment, either. The Kid donated a portion of the profits from this work to the non-profit organization Human Rights Watch, which defends the rights of people worldwide. (Via yatzer)

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Andrew Lyman’s photographs Of Ghostlike Figures Captures The Transcendence Of Memory

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Andrew Lyman, an artist and photographer living and working in Savannah, Georgia, creates “Fleeted Happenings”, a series in which the artist explores “the transcendence of memory through time in relation to space.”

These photographs envision the ephemerality of the body. Especially the reality of it being able to be in a state of being and becoming, of transcendence and disappearing. The photos feature ghostlike silhouettes that appear in scenic landscapes and surroundings that evoke feelings of nostalgia, but also of the sublime. The vast, endless, and empty spaces, not only seem beautiful because of its brilliant hues, but they also evoke fear, and anxiety, as these still remain unknown. Similarly, the transparent silhouettes suggest more of the same feelings. We are enthralled by their beauty and mysteriousness, yet, as we look at them, we acknowledge the possibility our body existing as a non-tangible, transparent form. Consequently, this brings forth questions of life after death, life before existence, and the reality of past memory an non-tangible ‘object’. As we look at these transparent, other-worldly, yet familiar forms, we have no other choice but to think about how one re-imagines memory; specifically how we envision a memory and its existence in a certain space at a given time in the past. (Via Feather of Me)

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Matt Lee

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From illustrator and photographer Matt Lee, here are some photos of film posters around South India. It’s interesting how foreign film industries so close follow American trends. I expected to see posters that are more in the style of traditional 70s Bollywood posters (basically nicely illustrated montages of multiple characters, each in an action pose, and a cool look treatment of the title), but it seems that just as Hollywood has moved on since its days of ornately illustrated movie posters, so has India. So instead of illustrations we have Photoshop jobs.

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