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Stunning Timelapse Captures A Seemingly Dead Plant Come Back To Life

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Videographer Sean Steininger of Tender Fox has put together a stunning video timelapsing the resurrections of the Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla) plant. This plant can survive months and sometimes years without water, curling up and browning to the appearance of death – that is, until the presence of water quickly, and seemingly magically, brings the plant back to bright, green life. Steininger captured a time span of just 12-24 hours, documenting the fingers of foliage unfurling multiple times in order to best capture this amazing transformation. You can actually purchase a Rose of Jericho plant on Amazon, if you’d like to experience the water resurrection first-hand. (via colossal)

 

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Dave Collinson

12 Dave Collinson is an artist fresh out of the Australia. His illustrations and motion work are some of the coolest I’ve seen bar far (and he’s only 22.)

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Typographic Party Time: Alex Witjas

Take a cleanly-gridded typographic poster, drag it along to an 80s reunion party, throw a handful of rainbow confetti in the air… and then you’ll get the work of Alex Witjas. A graduate of the Graphic Design program at Pratt Institute, Alex currently works as a graphic designer for Urban Outfitters, and has a portfolio full of fun stuff. Enjoy a selection from some of Alex’s graphic design work after the jump.

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Edward Kinsella Soothing Figures

There is something peaceful and almost soothing about the charming characters in  Edward Kinsella’s illustrations.

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Mike Nelson Is Destroying Gallery Walls And Deconstructing Installation Art

Mike Nelson - installation

Mike Nelson - installation

Mike Nelson - installation

Mike Nelson - installation

British artist Mike Nelson‘s installations feel a bit like you’ve stumbled onto a movie set. He sets up eerie scenarios that are very minimal, but impactful. His piece To the Memory of H.P Lovecraft (1999,2008) saw him bashing holes in the pristine white gallery walls and freestanding plinths, as if some creature had torn it’s way through the room. Leaving the narrative vague and bare, Nelson leaves it up to the viewer to react to his installations as they want to. Nelson plays with simulation, representations of the real, replicas and objects placed in new contexts. By recreating something quite simple, but in a new and unexpected way, he is able to make us feel at odds with the space.

Nelson rebuilds interior scenes as well as destroying them. In The Projection Room (Triple Bluff Canyon) in 2009 he blocked the access to a replica of a typical south-London Victorian terraced house and forced the visitors to peek through a window. Objects spewed out of one tiny split in the wall in a very bizarre fashion. Nelson talks about his practice:

I’ve always had a slight fear of piles of junk that function purely as decorative ephemera but only act as a signifier of a certain type of installation…I think it’s a constant worry that you’ll make this amount of effort to have something that just becomes spectacle, as opposed to something which moves somebody or encourages somebody to empathize with what you’re trying to lure them into, or coax them towards. (Source) (Via Sweet Station)

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Whimsical And Strangely Stiff Illustrations Inspired By Music

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Angela Dalinger’s illustrations are difficult not to fall in love with. They are funny, whimsical, strangely stiff, and make us nostalgic for our own lofty teenage renditions of music, art, and adulthood.

The playful bio on her website only adds to the cryptic childlike mystique-

“I’m 29. I live in a very small town very close to Hamburg since I escaped from there. I am busy working on my career in illustration, means I’m mostly busy painting and drawing and being nuts. I’m born as Sandra Angela Wichmann and use my artist name since 2 years, simply because I really hate my real surname.”

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Matthew Yake’s Trash Collection

 

But no, really, Matthew Yake’s series “237 Pieces of Trash Around the Bleachers” is anything but a trash collection. His photos are poignant, clear, and powerful. He’s got other equally awesome series including one of artists in their studios that holds it’s own against other interior powerhouse sites like “The Selby“.

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Little Worries

Little Worries creates delicate and exquisite drawings with a surreal bend where broken figures morph into abstract balls of detail as well as each other.

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