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Tony Orrico’s Drawings Test The Limits Of Physical Movement

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Since 2009, Tony Orrico has performed his Penwald drawings. Combining elements found in dance, theater and performance art, it explores repetitive movement for long periods of time, bringing drawing’s motion into peril with human physicality. The idea originates in finding a point when an act becomes more than just motor skills and crosses over into the creative process. In Tony’s case, this leaves an aesthetic mark on physical existence in the form of an abstract drawing.

After graduating with an MFA in Choreography from the University of Iowa, Tony joined Shen Wei and Trisha Brown Dance companies. As a principle, he performed in major cities around the globe, including Sydney Opera House. Both troupes known for an avant garde approach ensured that he was never far away from a serious art practice. When he was ready, this enabled him to use the experience he learned as a dancer and combine it with his passion for drawing. One of his first Penwald performances at Postmasters Gallery, NY in 2009, would set the stage for everything that followed. From there, he received an opportunity to perform at The National Academy Of Sciences in Washington DC, and  was soon taking his “Penwald” series to venues worldwide. He was one of the few selected to reappropriate performances from Marina Ambramovic’s retrospective, “The Artist is present” at New York’s Museum Of Modern Art, an experience he was honored to have.

His newest project, CARBON, further investigates the relationship between material, body and movement.  Again, testing the limits of physical, mental and creative capacity, Tony sleeps in a box of graphite broken off throughout the course of a day, from Mexican pottery bowls. The material is used as a metaphor for life and death. A few recent highlights include performances at The Metz-Pompidou, New Museum, BAM, and solo Exhibits at PPOW Gallery NY, MUAC Mexico and Shoshanna Wayne Gallery Los Angeles.

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Claire Oswalt’s All In One Drawings, Installations, And Kinetic Sculptures.

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I’m not sure what to call these works by Claire Oswalt, they span the categories of drawing, installation, and kinetic sculpture. Whatever medium they are, they’re marvelously emotional and and elegantly executed.

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Suzanne Sattler

Suzanne Sattler, Graphite on paper

When I first saw the work of Suzanne Sattler, the first words that came to mind were whimsical and desolate. These delicate drawings express many conflicted emotions in such a fragile yet feminine manner. Focused on successful and failed relationships, she manages to incorporate a relationship between the concept of daily life and that of nature. Some of these narrative illustrations are presented in a monochrome landscape with delicately pencil markings, making them mysterious, whimsical and melancholic.

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Jenny Aryton Encapsulates Childhood Memories In Molten Glass

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British artist Jenny Aryton creates “miniature wonderlands captured in molten glass.” Almost like snow globe depictions of every day life, Jenny Aryton’s work physically encapsulates intimate depictions of her private world. Gaining inspiration from her young daughter, she aims to gather excitement from the mundane. Her work tends to have a “domestic twist” as she allows her surrounding of her home and family guide the way as her source imagery. Her process begins by creating small metal wire figurines. She fashions tiny sweaters, chairs, trees, shovels, and other objects found in an everyday family home. She then organizes a simplistic scene, almost like a child playing with a dollhouse. After everything has been arranged, Aryton then encases it between two layers of molten hot glass which is poured at 1100ºC (2012ºF). She uses what is called sandcasting. She molds the overall shape of the piece in sand — just as a plaster sculptor would do with clay or wax. One the first layer is poured, she has one brief moment, while the glass is still fluid, to manipulate the aspects of the piece. The second layer is then poured and the whole piece is placed to set in a kiln for two days where it will take its final form. The glass, as a fragile and volatile material, will solidify differently each time, creating a one of a kind piece.  The delicate and cloudy imperfection of each piece almost seems to mimic the memory of a child. The have a solemn charm that is nostalgic yet innocent. Each piece is quiet, quaint and unique. (via iGNANT)

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Superheroes Wearing Nothing But Dynamic Splashes Of Colored Milk

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz - Digital C-Print

Artist Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz uses unlikely elements to construct his unbelievable and complex photographs of superheroes, or Splash Heroes. However, unlike normal superheroes, his heroes are not wearing ordinary uniforms, but outfits created from splashes of colored milk. Each constructed photograph contains a confident, strong superwoman posed in a capable and superior pose. Even more impressive, the liquid was not just simply digitally edited onto all of the models, but actually thrown onto them during the photo shoot. Wieczorkiewicz created this liquid clothing with splashes of milk with food coloring. Splashes are thrown in different places of the body in order to fabricate multifaceted outfits to mimic how real clothing may fit. This process demands an extreme amount of time and patience in order to create such a flawless result. In fact, each photograph is created from layering and editing together about 200 images. These many photos are layered over each other to form the finished photograph.

This is not the first series of milk-covered women that photographer Wieczorkiewicz has done. He has also created a similar series containing pin-up girls dressed in splashes of white milk. In this most recent series, Splash Heroes, Wieczorkiewicz’s work is pushed to a more dynamic level full of energy, movement, and dramatic color. The deep, glossy colors of liquid add a powerful vibe that gives the women a demanding presence. Each woman superhero is in mid-motion as their milk-suits swirl and travel around their bodies, creating a force field of milk. Wieczorkiewicz has all of his Splash Heroes available in a calendar, one for each month. (via Faith is Torment)

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Ani K paints With His Tongue

Everyone is looking for their 15 minutes of fame. We throw caution to the wind, risk our financial stability, and in the case of Ani K from Kerala, India even put our health at risk in the pursuit of artistic fame and glory. Ani K paints with his tongue. He must paint with water based paints right? Wrong! Mr. K had the brilliant idea to paint with oil paint using his tongue after he was inspired by an artist who painted with his foot. At first Ani tried using his nose but soon discovered that someone had beat him to the punch. So out with the nose and in with the tongue. “I thought of giving my tongue a try and succeeded,” he says. “Many newspapers reported it. I got a good response. Then, I made it a regular practice.”

 

Now I can’t tell you how dangerous and deadly it is to paint with oils with your tongue and I’m guessing Ani K didn’t read The Artist’s Handbook of Materials And Techniques. Do not try this at home folks. This will cause severe brain and nerve damage and will make you die. Unfortunately Ani K doesn’t seem to care since he’s getting lots of attention in the press. Just goes to show how desperate we all are to feel a few moments of appreciation and success. (via oddity central)

 

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Sabi Van Hemert

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Sabi Van Hemert is a Dutch artist who creates sculptures that are fusions of children and animals. Van Hemert likes to play on  the idea that the viewer has his or her interpretation on what they see. Because it is not immediately obvious what you see, the relationship between the spectator and the image is more complex, which is what Van Hemert strives to get from her work. Van Hemert says she has developed a rhythm to her work: precision, and the material she uses, help gives her work its alienating yet sensual, tough yet vulnerable character.

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Mark Schoening’s Explosive Paintings

 

Mark Schoening‘s paintings appear to explode on each panel.  Colors and patterns seem to erupt like uncontrollable viruses supplanting the composition.  In a way Schoening’s work develops in a similar fashion.  Each piece begins with an idea, information.  The concept is elaborated on further and further layering glitter, resin, silkscreen, acrylic, latex, and spraypaint.  His newest works are an investigation of the way floods of information are spread and consumed.  Schoening says:

“I do not have the luxury of escape.  In this century, in this moment, few of us do.  Information piles up: the advertisements, the mechanisms, the media, the people.  I am attached to it, in the midst of it, a part of it.  However, as a painter, I am also a witness and a reactionary.”

Mark Schoening opens a new solo exhibit, Recordings of a Lone Infantryman, November 29, 2012 at Marine Conemporary in Venice, California.

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