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NAWLZ

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NAWLZ is an online interactive comic book by Australian artist Stu Campbell (Sutu). What I liked about this project is that it combines the concept of new media art and storytelling. He uses text, illustration, music, animation and interactive juxtaposed imagery and animation to unfold the story. It’s quite an interactive comic book and in a way requires the reader to be attentive as in order to move forward in the story you need to move around the page and find the next tab. It creates an environment that in itself becomes part of a new genre in stroytelling when we are seeing more often the crossover between art, technology and interactivity.

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Alejandro Bombín’s Work May Look Like Digital Glitches But They Are In Fact Meticulously Detailed Paintings

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Alejandro Bombín’s paintings are deceptive. At first glance, many of them appear to be old, faded images from vintage publications that were scanned into the computer. Something went awry and now they look glitchy. But, what they actually are is meticulously detailed acrylic works that produce a digital mistake by hand.

By dividing up the image into rows (take a look at the detail above), Bombín is able to draw the the picture and fracture it by shifting the picture right or left from its original center. He uses a pointillist technique and pairs pure colors together, which from far away forms a cohesive image. And, at the same time, these colors and the texture from it are reminiscent of a lo-res, pixelated image.

The distorted images point to our desire to hold onto the past and the failings that we experience with technology. Digitizing something ensures that we’ll have it forever. Photographs and newspaper clippings? Not so much. But what happens when technology fails us too? Bombín’s paintings remind us that both can be fickle and that there are no guarantees.

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Ryan Biegen Hands Out 60 Disposable Cameras To 25 Artists, Capturing The Raw Essence Of Summer

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With images of fireworks, stick and pokes, young lust, and a guy who decided to shake the hand of 27 strangers, Ryan Biegen’s project, Disposable Summer, exposes an honest, memoir-like, catalog of youth. His project started with the documentation of his own travels using throw away cameras, eventually leading him to an idea for a larger project that would culminate in an exposé of the lives of 25, young, Brooklyn based artists. He states:

“I like the simplicity and the well, disposable aspect of the cameras.  They’re breakable, recycled things, often with inaccurate viewfinders, skewed lenses, light leaks etc.  Most of the time what you think will be a good shot ends up awful, and what you think will be awful, ends up as magic. Disposable cameras have a funny way of doing that; their quirky nature lends to unexpected, often unintended, results.”

Despite the diaristic nature of the work, the images seem to blur the line between art and documentation. The camera’s imperfections create a unspecific sensibility of timelessness; they act as delicate, washed out montages of ephemeral adolescence. The physical vulnerability of the film allows the combination of light and chance to guide each image into having it’s own version of reality.

A large part of the projects charm, is that the images, even within the fantastical realm of the distortion, are indeed replications of the genuine. Without the falsified nature of social media platforms, crops, filters, or hashtags, they expose the artist’s summer the way they truly happened. They have a simplicity that results in a euphoric sense of freedom — unaffected by the world outside of the specific moment. They have a true type of raw energy. The type that only ever exists in the summer.

For more of Ryan Biegen’s work, check him out on Instagram or join him tonight at the opening.

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Alexander Seton’s Marble Sculptures Of Clothing

Sydney, Australia based Alexander Seton’s sculptures are a thing of wonder. Stare at them for a while and you’ll soon realize that these casual images of light weight clothing are in fact carved out of marble, one of the heaviest stones around!

“Alexander Seton’s work memorializes impermanence and the transitory. His marble sculptures give permanent form to fleeting cultural moments and fashions, capturing icons of the contemporary world. In Elegy On Resistance Seton has arranged around a central figure [Soloist] a group of CCTV cameras [Quartet 1 – 4] and hanging hoodies [Chorus 1-7]. The naming of these objects implies a relationship, like a musical performance, an ensemble that bears witness to the resistance of the individual against the apparatus of surveillance and control. The central track-suited man might be a heroic figure, but, in reality, the cities of the modern world are full of such figures, faces shrouded and bodies stooped, faceless everymen who habitually pass through train stations, shopping centres and the outer zones of the non-place. These hooded figures are ambiguous citizens, often feared as potential criminals, or as wild youth gone wrong. In Seton’s work, however, the figure recalls the pose of a Buddha, but with its substance – the body within – missing. There are connotations of religious art here, but in the generic striping of the tracksuit, the hands in pockets, the crossed legs and the unmistakably casual pose of a street beggar, a skillful conceptual play between the ubiquity and invisibility of an instantly recognizable, yet largely ignored figure.” -Andrew Frost

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Clay Bells Ring

In life, there’s always one goober buck-toothed bell who messes it up for the rest of the dignified, monocle-rocking mustachioed bells. As Will Vinton animates- the solution? Get a slingshot.

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Fauna and Flora- Hand Painted Photographs By Dietmar Busse

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Dietmar Busse is a German photographer who lives and works in New York City. It’s rare to encounter a body of work as wholly original as his extraordinary series, Fauna and Flora. An amalgamation of photography and painting, the pieces in the series manifest a beauty that occasionally veers into dark, dreamlike realms. Busse began painting (with photographic developer) on his prints. The resulting images so artfully meld the otherwise quite distinct media that they appear to coalesce — creating, in a sense, a new medium.

With no formal art training, Busse was long intimidated by the idea of painting. But in the last few years he began extending his experimentation even further, applying photographic retouching colors and inks to his prints.“Having a strong foundation in photography,” he says, “somehow gives me the courage to explore. The photograph serves as the foundation for the painting, capturing something about a person’s energy and spirit the way only photography can. The painting starts where photography can not go.” It is these co-mingled pieces that comprise Fauna and Flora.

“I did not set out to [focus on those concepts]. These were just the images I found myself making — and it made sense, for fauna and flora are what I grew up with, and what I relate to.” (via)

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Andy Freeberg’s Photos of Gallery Dealers At Art Fairs

Andy Freeberg‘s “Art Fare” series is currently on view at Kopeikin Gallery in Culver City, CA. The series captures gallery owners and artists, usually hidden behind desks and gallery walls, in plain sight at major art fairs. Simultaneously “real-life” and narrative drama, the photos depict the business of the art world in stark, natural light. The results are humorous, seedy, and honest.

The exhibition is up until October October 27th. See more photos from the show after the jump.

Images courtesy of Andy Freeberg and Kopeikin Gallery.

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Magic Mushrooms In Stop Motion Action Will Leave You Breathless

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Generally speaking, mushrooms are fascinating organisms. As part of the fungi family, they are neither plant nor animal and have an incredible capacity for growth. As evidenced in these stop motion gifs, we witness the mushroom cap or fruit, sprouting out of the ground in various shapes and sizes. The fruit is made up of 92% water allowing for its rapid maturity and part of the fungi you would normally throw onto pizza and salad. It’s this top section, which makes for an interesting visual specimen, as seen here in phallic, veiled and bumpy shapes, credited to nature’s grand design. The part you don’t see, called the root or mycelium, can remain dormant and underground for years. These are the real heroes, acting as nature’s garbage disposals, devouring all that is dead and decaying. Some fungi lore to speak of, includes the toadstool known for its red color, and white dotted spores. Those who grew up playing Nintendo, will remember these colorful blobs as part of the landscape in Super Mario Bros. and incarnate to “Toad” a figure in the game. Psilocybin or “magic mushrooms” are the rebels. In existence since prehistoric times, the fungi first appeared during the mesolithic period as evidenced on rock paintings taken from archaeological finds. Known for its pleasant, hallucinatory effects, studies have shown psilocybin can not only give you a nice high but help with OCD and clinical depression. (via boredpanda

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