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Gregory Kloehn Makes Awesome Sculptural Mobile Homes For The Homeless

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California-based artist Gregory Kloehn was tired of making sculptures for rich people. “It just sits there,” he said. “I kind of think that if you’re putting so much effort into something it would be nice if it actually did something.”

With the help of a close knit art community, Kloehn began his Homeless Homes Project, a collaborative endevour that provides sturdy, innovative and mobile shelters for the homeless.

They look like sculptures, but they actually serve a purpose.

Kloehn starts the process by installing beds, sinks, stoves, and storage shelves on regular old dumpsters and shipping containers. All of the ‘amenities’ are made with repurposed materials found on the streets.

To prove that his dumpster homes are fit to live, the artist put it to the test. He has actually lived in one that he built for himself, and fitted with such conveniences as granite counter topped kitchen, a microwave, a mini-stove, a fridge, and even a cushioned sofa.

With a successful run, Kloehn is a now a full-time home builder. So far he has built 10 tiny homes, some of which have already found tenants. (via Amusing Planet)

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Dance Of The Disfigured: Monica Piloni’s Resin Sculptures Are Disturbingly Elegant

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Sculptor Monica Piloni creates surreal, multifaceted versions of the human body from resin, hair and different plastics. Whether it is a triptych of herself, melded at the hips, with multiple breasts, three legs and conjoined heads, or a double tailed horse, she has the ability to make something gruesome seem commonplace. In her work Ballet Series, she assembles body parts to look quietly surreal and unassuming, yet elegant. Figures lie on beds, as if exhausted from a recital, literally collapsing on themselves. Piloni places her models in a graceful manner, toes pointed and muscles tensed as they would be mid-dance. The poses and gestures of the bodies conjure up the drama of French Romantic oil paintings, where humans were depicted expressing a whole range of emotions with their bodies.

In her work Concave & Convex, she piles dismembered body parts up on themselves to form a human landscape. Similar to Louise Bourgeois’s ambiguous sculptural forms, Piloni fragments the human shape into abstraction, and in the process dismantles her, and our, understanding of identity.

Her sculptures are captivating because of their simplicity and fluency of movement. Even her more challenging pieces (modified women with exposed genitalia) have a gentle symmetry that reassures, rather than revolts. See more of her beautifully gruesome work after the jump. (Via Sweet Station)

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Art Van Triest Creates Jigsaw Puzzles Out Of Illegal Weapons

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Dutch artist Art Van Triest plays a dangerous game. He encourages people to break the law, just by fitting a jigsaw puzzle piece together. After tracking down different weapons that are illegal to possess (Kalashnikov, Pistol, Machete), he uses a water cutter to splice them up into traditional jigsaw puzzle piece shapes.

For Triest it is important for the work to be made out of an actual weapon, and for the person solving the puzzle to be committing an illegal activity. He tells The Creator’s Project:

According to Dutch law, it is illegal to have any object that can be mistaken for a weapon, even when that weapon it is no longer useable… [to possess] a non-working gun-like object is already prosecutable. As an artist I think it is interesting to create work that embodies a kind of friction, an object that is at once a toy and a weapon. (Source)

Triest creates many different games and playful art pieces he wants the audience to interact with. He aims to change how people perceive everyday items they would normally avoid. In one piece (Dubbellloops / Shake Hands) he has welded two guns together and asks people to hold one trigger at the same time, as a method to ‘get to know each other’. In his installation Platoon, he places visitors looking directly down the barrel of a firing squad and has lasers following them around the space. Exploring the border between ‘object’ and ‘weapon’, Triest turns normally dangerous items into harmless, even playful ones.

Exploring turning other unsuitable objects into puzzles, Triest has a bright idea for his next project, that I’m sure will attract a lot of curious people wanting to solve it.

My next puzzle won’t be a weapon at all, I want to use a real human skull. (Source) (Via The Creator’s Project)

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Adam Levene

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Columbus, Ohio based Illustrator, Adam Levene, graduated from Columbus College of Art and Design with a BFA, and attended Illustration Academy for an extended study. His illustrations have a very classic style to them with a very strong sense of narration. Out of everything of his work, I really enjoyed his portraitures. Not only is he consistently generous in story, but character as well.

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The Living Landscapes of Siobhan McBride

 

Landscapes are alive in the paintings of Siobhan McBride.  Different locations mesh into a single scene.  Memories and colors delicately surface in the foreground.  McBride’s paintings aren’t so much surreal scenes as they are subtly collaged images in paint.  Speaking of her work McBride says:

“I have come to think of my paintings as views of a place where magic reveals itself differently than it does in this world. The scenes are tense with anticipation or blushing in the aftermath of an unseen event. Paintings combine disparate yet familiar fragments into spaces that are still, anxious, and temperamental.”

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Devin Yalkin’s Photographs Of Illegal Fight Nights In NYC Get You Up Close And Personal Into The Ring

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Anthony and other boxer connecting punches. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

The crowd consisting of a large number of Charlie’s friends celebrate as Charlie wins his match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Two boxers pair up before their match. (Old Fire House Soho, September, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Ring girl entertaining the crowd in-between rounds. (Old Fire House Soho, February, 2012)

Photographer Devin Yalkin points an unflinching eye to the underground world of illegal fight nights, capturing their raw intensity. These “Friday Night Throwdowns” happen in secret locations and venues all over New York City. In Yalkin’s series The Old One Two, this hidden world is revealed through intimate, black and white photographs with a Film Noir flavor to them. This powerful series gets you up close and personal to the fighters and the erupting crowd cheering them on. The compositions in this series can be as hazy and chaotic as the fight itself, capturing the true atmosphere of these fight nights. You can see the unrefined aggressiveness and brutality between the fighters, but also feel the excitement and energy from the audience.

Devin Yalkin allows us to take place of the spectator, seeing every bead of sweat and drop of blood on the skin of the fighters. The high tension and motion happening during these Friday Night Throwdown’s can be felt in each photograph. It is as if we are standing next to each eccentric character; the screaming fan, the eager fighter, or the elusive woman in lingerie whose role is somewhat unknown. All of the individuals shown in Yalkin’s series seem to come from all walks of life, having only the love of the fight connecting them.

Make sure to check out Devin Yalin’s new strange and beautiful series Abductions, which captures ominous scenes of which we cannot place, mysterious and alluring.
(via Featureshoot)

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Northern Italy Street Art

Got this mini documentary in my inbox today about graffiti artists in Northern Italy. It’s so interesting how graffiti has been morphing, changing and evolving in the last 10 years. I’m not even sure if the name street art or graffiti applies to this. Is it outdoor art, street art, graffiti, illegal brush painting? I’m confused!

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A Free Little Library On The Streets By Stereotank

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This curious little structure is one of ten Free Little Library “branches”.  Ten designer were chosen for the Free Little Library project – each designing and constructing a little library to place in Manhattan.  This is the design created by the firm known as Stereotank.  In the New York neighborhood of Nolita, the little library offers books and a bit of shelter to anyone passing by.  Small portholes allow visitors to peek inside for a preview before being drawn inside.  You can find Stereotank’s Free Little Library at St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School in Nolita through September of this year.   [via]

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