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Giant Red Ball Squeezes Into Tight Situations All Around The World

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A giant red ball has traveled the globe for the past 13 years. Aptly called the RedBall Project, it’s stopped in cities from Paris to Perth and is currently stationed in Rennes, France at the historic Place de la Mairie. It’s there from July 3rd to July 9th as part of the Les Tombées de la Nuit Arts Festival.

The larger-than-life inflatable sphere is currently squeezed into the Opéra de Rennes’ narrow archways and begs for the passersby to interact with it; at 250 pounds and 15 feet tall, it’s hard to miss. Reminiscent of a child’s toy on steroids, it adds a sense of playfulness to the landscape as it’s photographed, touched, and even bounced into.

The creator, Kurt Perschke, explains the idea behind his sculpture:

The urban environment is overbuilt and full of possibilities, and the project is about seeing the sculptural spaces of a city. The humor and charisma of the piece allow it access to the city and invites others into its story. I think it’s essential for public work to do more than be “outdoors” – it needs to live in the public’s imagination. (Via designboom)

 

 


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Made With Color Presents: Rachel Meuler’s Hybrid Beasts

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Made With Color, a website builder for artists and creatives, and Beautiful/Decay team up each week to bring you some of the best contemporary artists and designers from around the world. Website builder Made With Color helps artists easily create well-designed mobile/tablet responsive websites in a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are pleased to present the work of Made With Color user Rachel Meuler.

New York City based artist Rachel Meuler is a collagist of sorts. However instead of cutting up magazines and books to create her imagery, Meuler cleverly combines a mix of animal and human figures to create a new species of hybrid beings.These half man half beast figures are in a constant state of motion and transformation. The combination of human and animal imagery reinforces the similarities between all living things, while referencing characters from ancient mythologies, folklore and fairy tales, Jungian archetypes, evolutionary anomalies, and the mutant results of genetic engineering – beings originating from and entrenched in cultural fears and fantasies.  These subjects are shown exchanging information through a language of posturing, mirroring, projecting, and cannibalizing traits from each other and their surroundings, within compositional structures that imply hierarchy and narrative, but remain inconclusive.

 

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The Most Astonishingly Intricate Pathogens Constructed from Cut Paper

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Paper artist Rogan Brown, featured previously here, finds an exquisite beauty in even the most deadly pathogens, of which he constructs astonishingly detailed replicas from thinly cut and layered paper. For Outbreak, he maps out a stunning typography of microbes, neurons, and human cells. Renowned for his fastidious process, Brown spends up to five months on a single piece, a true labor of love that serves as a testament to the reverence he holds for the organic world. Here, the smallest microcosms of the human body are expanded, made vivid and sparkling. In complex webs, they form an impressive interlocking network that is heartbreakingly delicate and fragile.

Where disease-causing pathogens and microbes are typically disparaged as unsavory or unclean, Brown’s masterful and unparalleled craft recreates them in dazzling white, like organic snowflakes possessing endless wonderment. In a fast-paced culture increasingly dominated by technology, Brown draws inspiration from the likes of the romantic poet William Blake, who married his love for the earth with a thirst for the divine and mysterious in nature. While he begins from scientific sketches by biologists like Ernst Haekel, the artist ultimately surrenders to the currents of his own imagination, allowing for the warmth of the human mind to color and transfigure the microscopic forms that make up our bodies. After all, isn’t our own evolution and living existence the most intricate and miraculous artwork of all? Take a look. (via Colossal)
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Gregg Segal’s Poignant Portraits Of People Surrounded By One Week Of Their Own Trash

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Do you know what kind of trash you accumulate over the course of a single week? For California-based photographer Gregg Segal, this question comes with a loaded context: there’s the irrefutable issue of Americans producing more trash than nearly any other country, as well as the large-scale ramifications producing so much waste has on the environment. In his new ongoing series, ‘7 Days of Garbage,’ Segal recruited friends, neighbors, and other acquaintances to compile a week’s worth of their personal garbage and allow him to photograph them lying in it. The photos are provocative, with Segal crafting beaches, bodies of water, and other natural settings to place emphasis on the garbage his participants were willing to bring to him. “Of course, there were some people who edited their stuff. I said, ‘Is this really it?’ I think they didn’t want to include really foul stuff so it was just packaging stuff without the foul garbage. Other people didn’t edit and there were some nasty things that made for a stronger image.”

Segal aimed to include people from different socioeconomic backgrounds, providing for a fascinating display of different kinds of trash. By shooting from an overhead angle, garbage strewn between created natural environments, Segal crafts startlingly personal portraits that are oddly still detached, conveying a more poignant message lying underneath. “Obviously, the series is guiding people toward a confrontation with the excess that’s part of their lives. I’m hoping they recognize a lot of the garbage they produce is unnecessary,” he said. “It’s not necessarily their fault. We’re just cogs in a machine and you’re not culpable really but at the same time you are because you’re not doing anything, you’re not making any effort. There are some little steps you can take to lessen the amount of waste you produce.” (via Slate)

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Creative 3D Sculpted Alphabet Made From Food, Body Parts And Other Everyday Objects

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German design studio FOREAL has created an impeccable set of 3D alphabet renderings for their personal project “Sculpted Alphabet”. Playful series features the whole English alphabet made from various everyday objects, food products and even body parts. The whole set of 26 letters was created by two designers, Benjamin Simon and Dirk Schuster.

“New tools, new playgrounds. One single rule: Choose a letter and sculpt it! Maxon gave us it’s new sculpting tools with the last releases of Cinema 4D. Our goal was to create the whole alphabet and achieve some completely new ways how type can be built and seen. A playful execution of that self-initiated project helped us to gain some significant experience in cgi sculpting techniques while having a lot of fun. We hope you enjoy these as we did.”

The project by FOREAL is a candid illustration of how three-dimensional CGI (computer-generated imagery) has moved forward and continues to grow in capabilities. The artistic 3D alphabet was designed using one of the agency’s illustration tools, Maxon Cinema 4D. According to the producers, it is one of the greatest tools for recreating even the slightest details, such as hair or fur.

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Marie Rime Creates Primitive Masks And Armor Using Board Game Pieces And Party Straws

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Using recycled objects like board game pieces, party straws, and paper fans, Swiss artist Marie Rime created a fantastic set of masks and armor. The separate-yet-similar series are composed of multi-faceted objects that cover the subjects’ entire face and part of their body, forming silhouettes made from the likes of chess pawns and popsicle sticks. It recontextualizes kitsch and transforms the use of these tiny individual elements into a cohesive veil that obscures its model’s face. In both bodies of work, the emphasis is on power and competition.  Rime explains her mask project and writes:

In this series, the notion of game is being questioned. I tried to express my fascination with the relationship between the players. I asked myself what the participants are looking for and whether they are trying to disturb, seduce or intimidate opponents. These reflections led to a series of pictures of a female model wearing masks inspired by primitive tribal art, yet created from elements of the games being played in the championships.

Likewise, with the armor, she states, “These costumes, realised with everyday objects, are the starting point of a reflexion of the relationship between power, war and ornament. These women lose their identity and become the support of their clothing.” (Via La Monda)

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Ramona Rosales’s Electric Photographs Of Women Below The Knees Explode With Color

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With her electric series Outside the Lines, photographer Ramona Rosales elevates the everyday to the realm of high drama by staging eye-catching moments saturated in color. Through the course this witty narrative, a woman, seen only below the knees, undergoes a series of domestic blunders that are both comical and tragic. Each photograph is shot after the fact, as if to chronicle not the accidents themselves but their psychical impact upon our protagonist and her home.

Through a masterful use of color, Rosales plays with our perception, imbuing each still image with a vibrating, buzzing afterglow. Opposite colors create a visual tension as a green wall is juxtaposed with magenta pumps, a blue curtain with orange stockings. At the same time, harmonizing colors seem pull across the frame toward one another.

The wonderfully hectic blocks of color allow the photographs to flatten into a more two-dimensional plane and veer into the aesthetic we normally associate with collage, recalling great works of mid-century pop art and advertising. Unlike those perfected— and sometimes ironical— works espousing the pleasures of modern home, Rosales’s endearing subject appears to inhabit an indoor landscape ripe with tension and anxiety.

For Rosales, color isn’t an objective means of triggering an optical response; instead, she hopes to tap into our subjective memories and associations. Some of the narratives are drawn from her own life experiences, remembered incidents from which she incorporates at least two colors. Both humorous and delightfully suspenseful, Outside the Lines invites us to perceive the dynamic vitality of even the most banal of life’s many moments. Outside the Lines opens July 10 and runs through August 24, 2014 at De Soto Gallery.
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Ron English’s Pop Culture Guernica Interpretations

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Artist Ron English is best known for his bright and playful pop culture aesthetic, and a blending of high and low art cultures, something he refers to as “popaganda.” A multitude of characters and references populate his works, and it’s this accessibility that lends his work its effectiveness. One particular painting – Picasso’s Guernica – represents a modern template for English that he has interpreted over 50 times, and English approaches each interpretation aware and reverent of the original’s cultural significance.

English writes, “[Guernica] is a visual shorthand for the overwhelming and gratuitous horror of modern war. But I argue that the cultural takeaway of Guernica is actually the opposite. It transforms incomprehensible tragedy into a cartoon narrative, something we can more easily absorb. This is part of the human process, to distance ourselves from the immediacy of undiluted, overwhelming emotions by overlaying a narrative that simplifies, and in effect, takes us down from three to two dimensions. And this is the underlying concept that I grapple with in all my many versions of Guernica.”

English’s approach to the Guernica template resonates throughout much of his work; the artist often interprets our visually-saturated cultures, recontextualixing familiar imagery in order to critique or present ideas that can be more easily absorbed. In order to capture particular lighting and angles, English constructs 3D models of some his concepts before painting them. While each interpretation is unique in its imagery, English admits he’s “…always riffing on the same basic message — that cultural bias is embedded in our narrative. [His] Guernicas call attention to the product placement of global corporate culture, using war as entertainment and entertainment as war.” (via huffington post)

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