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Brand New Car Is Wrapped In Customized Vinyl To Look Like A Rust Bucket

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Have you ever had anything stolen? Perhaps a cellphone, or bag, or bike, or even a car? Well if you have been the victim of someone’s swift fingers, then you will really like this project. Some clever individual has decided to be pro-active and beat the thieves at their own game. After purchasing a brand new VW van, they have enlisted the help of UK based vinyl wrap company Clyde Wraps to avoid being the target of any crime.

With some clever coloring and detailing, they have made their 2014 Volkswagen T5 Sportline look like a rusty old van that shouldn’t be fit to drive around the city. Big rust stains drip down from the handles, the side panels look like they are disintegrating in front of your eyes, and the wing mirrors look like they have seen better days. Of course the actual body of the car is fine – the tires, the lights, and the windows all seem brand new and dent free.

But for someone looking quickly to see whether it is worth the trouble to steal this van, they will look twice. And who knows? Maybe the owner will even be able to leave their vehicle, walk around town and get away with not locking their doors! (Via Lost At E Minor)

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Jon Almeda’s Incredibly Miniature Pottery Fits Between Your Finger Tips

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Jon Almeda creates miniature glazed ceramics which could easily be misunderstood for a pretend tea set play party, the average size of a piece being 1” scale. He designs cups, pots, tea kettles and bowls that perfectly resemble normal sized items. All the details are there: furrows, textures, handles and lids. In order to attain this meticulousness, he had to come up with the instrument that would allow him to get thorough so he built his very own pottery wheel, which is called “curio wheel”. Despite their fragile appearance, the small ceramics are nonetheless solid and able to resist the high temperature of glaze fusing.

The artist doesn’t seem to care about what’s normal. He prefers to juggle between the extremes; he goes from creating huge ceramics to sculpting macro pieces. The time he spends on doing so is more enjoyable. He compares this time to a meditation cession where he can focus on the creation and nothing else.
Jon Almeda’s inspirations are soothing and flowy. He says he likes to drift away thinking of calm dark waters and luscious flora from places where he spends most of his time. His creativity seems to be coming when his mind is somewhere else, daydreaming and meditating when his hands create beautiful little gems.

Jon Almeda is currently selling his art on Etsy.  For more updates, visit his Instagram account. (via thisiscolossal)

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Wallpaper Company Feathr Breaks The Mold And Collaborates With Artists To Create Bold Designs

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Now you can decorate your home/office/studio with wallpaper that strays from the norm. A company called Feathr has started collaborating with artists to make statement with bold wallpaper design that will inspire your daily routine. Definitely staying within the parameters of textile design the company now represents a large group who think outside the box. Some of the collaborators include Peter Judson who takes art deco in his brightly colored patterns to arrive at a striking motif and Russell Marshall who pulls directly from Warhol and uses a gun and the check bought with it for pop effect. Using both abstract and figurative patterns the placement and use of color pushes these new designs just a tad off the grid thus allowing for more free-flowing ideas. By joining up with different artists the company allows for more conversations to occur between design and fine art which references Andy Warhol’s pop and consumer ideal. This middle ground allows more people to see the work of these artists and also show how their ideas can be used in a more commercial sense.

The papers are all reasonably priced and can be bought on the Feathr website. They are currently becoming a cool commodity in the design field. (via designmilk)

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Pablo Reinoso Transforms Park Benches Into A Swirling Chaotic Knot Of Line And Form

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Pablo Reinoso recreates a basic park bench into a swirling chaotic knot of line and form, giving a new dimension to a common piece of furniture.  By sculpting organic spaghetti shaped wood branches his ultimate goal is to modify the perception we have on simple objects. Those animated random pieces of furniture are meant to create a state of visual suprise, the materials (wood, marble, steel) are becoming living beings; new species of their own.

The artist extends the primal functions of a bench, a frame, a chair, a pillow and a slab of marble to a new dimension, gently associating sculpture and art with nature.
The result is baffling, our notion of space is reset as there is no manual of how to consider the transformed pieces. Pablo Reinoso builds a landscape from marble, an air ventilating machine from pillows, spaghetti roots from a bench and replaces the canvas of a frame with swirled pieces of wood with no other intention than to turn our world around. By reinitializing daily objects and giving them life we encounter Pablo Reinoso’s subtle prediction: “The presence of flora is a message, mother nature is somewhere around. And she could be taking over”.

Pablo Reinoso’s solo show can be viewed at La Maison de l’Amerique Latine in Paris, St Germain district until September 5th 2015. The Breathing Sculptures piece can be viewed at La Maison Rouge in Paris, Bastille disctrict as part of the Buenos Aires artists group exhibition until September 20th 2015.

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Drifting: The Haunting, Baroque-Style Nudes Of Olivier Valsecchi Embody Beauty And Despair

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Olivier Valsecchi is a photographer with an eye for transforming bodies into emotional landscapes of strength and despair. We featured his powerful I Am Dust project last February. The series featured here, entitled Drifting, takes a different approach to human architecture; instead of majestic, stately nudes, we see men and women reclining alone and in pairs, arching their backs against bare tables and chairs with a baroque-style melancholia. The darkness surrounding the figures highlights their pale expressions of death and defeat, lending the illuminated flesh a cadaverous-yet-living quality. The series statement elaborates further on this bodily ambiguity:

“Straying the audience from their grounds of certainty, Valsecchi induces an unsettling doubt on whether his subjects are falling apart or withstanding paralysis. He investigates this tenuous and brooding space between inertia and the urge to go somewhere. His bodies appear to have been submitted to an exorcism, an epileptic trance, or a mutilation akin to a reptile being cut in two pieces — and yet still crawling.”

Drifting also channels the art tradition of still life. Posed to capture the wordless throes of pain and despair, the figures’ perfect configurations make them portraits of emotion. Speaking to the use of the genre, Valsecchi writes: “Still-life was the perfect fit for a post-war atmosphere. Beyond symbolizing the ephemeral nature of life, it relates to the notion of transitioning. I wanted to set bodies into an unfamiliar environment and infuse them with a feeling of disorientation, as if recovering from trauma or stuck in a vertigo.” Despite their static postures of grief and submission, Valsecchi’s tragic nudes tremble on the verge of healing, embodying and enduring the darkness so that they can overcome it.

Visit Valsecchi’s website and Facebook to learn more about his work.

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Alain Cornu’s Dreamy Photographs Of Parisian Rooftops At Nighttime

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We probably all have an image of Paris in our heads; a romantic, cliched view of a city most English speakers idealize and fantasize about. As a recent first-time visitor to the city of lights (affectionately nicknamed la Ville Lumière), I am also guilty of having this idea. I dreamed it would be full of tiny quaint shoebox-sized apartments covered with ivy, or snow (depending on the season); the cityscape full of scooter sounds zipping through the alleys, or cats screeching as they scampered over falling garbage cans. I’m not sure if I can say whether that vision was realized while I was there, or entirely imagined, but I can relive a certain nostalgia when I see the photography of Alain Cornu.

Cornu captures a theatrical side to the romantic city, illuminated in the moonlight. Focusing on the endlessly interesting rooftops of Paris, his images are a treat to look at. Full of so many angles, hidden corners, inviting skylights and alcoves that we would normally overlook, the images are like a sweet homage to the power of potential in the city.

Having previously worked in the genres of landscape, Cornu is well versed at turning his subjects into fascinating objects. His past series include trees, rocks, misty fields, piles of twigs, windows, walls, doorways, streets, beach fronts, and walkways. And while all of these things could potentially be boring and un-inspirational, they turn into something absorbing and engaging in the hands of this observant photographer.

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Artist Philip Haas Re-Imagines Giuseppe Arcimboldo’s Famous Food Face Portraits In Larger Than Life Sculptures

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Artist and filmmaker Philip Haas has taken 16th century paintings and brought them into modern day in the form of larger than life sculptures. Haas has created four busts of the paintings titled The Four Seasons by Renaissance painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo. The original paintings portray four busts cleverly formed from fruits, vegetables, and flora that represent each of the four seasons. The piece Autumn appropriately displays lush fruit making up the person’s plump cheeks, while Winter is revealed through bare twigs for hair and lumpy roots for the face. Haas’s sculptures are enormous and spectacular replicas of these paintings, down to every last plant that makes up the face of each character. The paintings as well as the sculptures portray and compare the never-ending cycle of life and unavoidable aging of humans in a beautiful and fascinating way.

What is absolutely amazing about the work being re-imagined and recreated as sculptures is that each of the works are fifteen feet high. Each intricate face completely engulfs the viewer in its interesting details, allowing you to examine every leaf, vegetable, and vine protruding from their facial features. Haas has given us a monumental series of works that shine a new light on the original masterpieces from the 1500’s. Haas’s sculptures have been shown all around the United States in a variety of unique venues including the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, the Atlanta Botanical Garden, and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

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Faye Moorhouse’s Amusingly Weird Movie Poster Illustrations Are Better Than The Real Thing

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Faye Moorhouse is a Brighton-based freelance artist known for her raw and weird paintings. Messy lines, odd proportions, and smeared watercolors characterize her highly stylized work. Her subject matter is similarly strange — from violent animal attacks to eerie midnight gatherings to depressed-looking people loitering around rundown towns, everything she paints is a complex mix of childlike play and adult absurdity.

Featured here is Moorhouse’s new series called the Wonky Movie Poster Show, wherein she has illustrated twenty movie posters. As she wrote in an email to It’s Nice That last week, the paintings are intended to be “weird and ugly and hopefully funny” (Source). Her assessment is correct; the eros of the Nymphomania poster is reduced to a bedraggled woman who appears to be yawning, and the stately lion of The Lion King looks apathetically over the white void of his kingdom. By filtering these familiar images through her own bizarre lens, Moorhouse strips away the hype and seriousness surrounding these films and makes us laugh.

Moorhouse’s unique style has gotten her work recognized. In addition to her fun and bizarre self-initiated projects, her clients include The New York Times, Salt Hill Journal, and Epiphany Zine. Visit Moorhouse’s website, Instagram, and Twitter to follow her work. Prints, ceramics, and other goods can be purchased via her Etsy shop. (Via It’s Nice That)

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