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John Squire on Cy Twombly

I’m really into these TATE Britain Artist “Shots” lately. All under 5 minutes or less, they’re succinct little vignettes that are informative, yet still short and sweet. Here’s a bite of John Squire, an amazing musician and artist (from my hometown in England of Manchester) who was in the Stone Roses talking about Cy Twombly.

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Would you buy this milk?

Milk carton

Clean, beautiful, and informative packaging design by Audree rethinks those nutritional figures we always take for granted. If everything we ate had this sort of packaging, would we still be eating it? Is ignorance bliss??

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Jess Landau’s Poignant Nude Photographs Amazingly Printed On The Delicate Surface Of Eggshells

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Tragedy can yield new ways of working and thinking, especially in the case of artist Jess Landau. After a lifelong friend committed suicide in 2013, she was struck trying to come to terms with the loss, and it lead her to explore new ways to cope with the event. What resulted was a stunning series that conveys the fragility of life itself as expressed through nude figures on eggshells.

Before she landed on eggshells, Landau decided that the traditional materials of  wood, papers, etc., just weren’t cutting it. She wanted something more delicate. The decision to use the shells coincided with her learning to use liquid emulsion, a chemical that makes paper light-sensitive and allows images to be projected onto it in a darkroom. “Liquid emulsion will only adhere to surfaces that have a tooth — shiny and smooth surfaces like glass and certain plastics don’t work unless you sand-blast them,” the artist explained to Huffington Post. “Eggshells have an appropriate texture for the emulsion to cling to.

First, Landau photographed the models with a 35mm Minolta camera and then developed the images by hand in a wet lab using traditional darkroom methods and a few modifications. Because of the eggshells’ curved shape, Landau applied several layers of evenly-distributed emulsion to to them. The exposure would vary depending on the shape of the shell, making the process for each slightly unique.

The effort that went into the production of this series had therapeutic results in addition to its beautiful aesthetic qualities.  “Life is fragile and temporary, and it should be cradled in the palms of our hands — which is the process that I engaged with as I delicately created each of these works manually, with my hands.” The nude bodies represent vulnerability of its subjects, and printed on a delicate surface demonstrates the fleeting nature of life itself. (Via Huffington Post)

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Homeland: Syrian Artist Khaled Takreti

 

Syrian artist Khaled Takreti is the spotlight of a new exhibition at the prestigious Ayyam Gallery in Dubai, debuting today and running through November 29. Although known for vibrant, saturated canvases, which seem to conjure the ghosts of Modigliani, Matisse and Warhol, his new exhibition presents a softer, more subdued approach; Takreti toning back his pigment-happy habits with a muted palette of earth tones and the occasional dramatic splashes of color in order to present a more realistic view of life. It is, in fact, Takreti’s own view of life in his homeland of Syria–the interpretation of which, with Takreti’s dramatic vacant spaces and quiet colors, is left entirely up to us.

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The Found Photograph Collage Drawings Of Joe Rudko

Joe Rudko is a talented artist based in Washington state. In his current series he combines found photographs with his drawings. According to his artist statement: “These works are responses to a shifting relationship with found photographic objects. Collaging a vintage material with hand drawn addendums exposes the vulnerability of the static image.” Check out more images after the jump.

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Bence Hajdu’s Images Of Altered Classical Paintings

Hungarian artist Bence Hajdu digitally edited out all the characters from old master paintings for his aptly titled series Abandoned Paintings. What started as a simple study of perspectival drawing turned into a series about the environments of renaissance painting which, outside the world of art historians, is largely ignored. Previously encouraged by the painters to focus on the Virgin Mary, Jesus and his disciples, Horatii warriors, and baby angels, we now shift our attention to tiled floors, towns outside the window, empty dinner tables, arches, boats, and gardens. Work this flawless is always stunning to stare at, and will hopefully inspire lots of photoshop-savvy art history enthusiasts to do this with all their favorite paintings. Bence’s statement:

“I am a student at the university of fine arts, hungary. At one of the descriptive geometry classes we had a task to find and draw the perspective and horizon lines of renaissance and other pictures with significant perspective space. I thought it is not that interesting to just draw lines, so I decided to erase all the characters from them and examine how the painter really created the perspective space and how it actually looks. I saw this could be something exciting and continued thinking and working on it. After a while I found myself interested in the new atmosphere and the new thoughts the retouched pieces generated without their main subjects.”

( via )

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Finders Keepers, curated by An Hoang for Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA

BLAZE LAMPER, Autumn Sass, 2012, Graphite on paper, 12 x 9 inches

JUSTIN VALDES, Lookout B!, 2010, Pencil and ink on paper, 8 ½ x 10 ¼ inches

Finders Keepers, a group exhibition curated by An Hoang including Joseph Hart, Todd Knopke, Blaze Lamper, Andy Ness, and Justin Valdes featuring drawings, collages, and photographic prints. This show brings together artists who engage in a creative process which allows for discovery through the act of making. What is found by the artists remains to be discovered by the viewer. Whether it is an edge, a gesture or the way the figure is revealed, all the works provide for the experience of uncovering the hidden.

Joseph Hart’s works on paper examine compositional tension through an elegant balance of spontaneous and deliberate marks, heavy and delicate forms, and subtle gestures confined by thick layers of graphite. The detailed, constructed fabric pieces and photographic prints by

Todd Knopke, incorporate the textures, patterns and seams inherent in the material to form dreamlike compositions which transcend the original story of the clothing. Blaze Lamper’s enigmatic graphite drawings feature mysterious figures whose faces remain veiled while in plain sight. The watercolors and pencil drawings by Andy Ness explore personal themes of searching and wandering using recurring imagery of ships, airplanes, teeth, and the reconstructed body to form newly defined narratives. Incorporating airbrush, acrylic and pencil, the still-life drawings by Justin Valdes investigate the relationship between object and frame.

Frederieke Taylor Gallery at TSA presents Finders KeepersTSA is a new Bushwick gallery located at 44 Stewart Avenue, #49 Brooklyn, NY, 11237.
On view from November 16, 2012 – January 6, 2013. Opening: Friday, November 16, 7-10PM.

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Sebastian Zimmermann Provides A View Into The Unique Offices Of New York City Therapists

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What’s behind the door of a therapist’s office? Psychiatrist and photographer Sebastian Zimmermann provides a look into these spaces with his new book titled Fifty Shrinks. It features 50 portraits of New York City therapists in offices that are normally only seen by their patients.

In contrast to other medical specialists’ offices with their practical equipment of examining tables and rolling tools, the therapist’s work space has few obvious demands beyond seating for clinician and patient,” Zimmermann writes in the introduction. It’s fascinating to see how these offices vary, each with their own idiosyncrasies that meant to support those they’re trying to treat.  An essay for the book, by architect Elizabeth Danze, explains that the spaces are “floating vessels, places of sanctuary and protection, healing, and reconciliation,” and goes on to say, “a patient reflects on the trajectory of his or her therapy, an indelible part of that recollection involves the space in which it took place.

Depending on your personal preference, some offices are more appealing than others. The colors, textures, and choice of seating are all different and no doubt unique to their own philosophies. Zimmermann had the idea for this project about 13 years ago, when he was starting his own practice, and became “aware of the paradox that I spent most of my time interacting with many people yet feeling that I worked in isolation.” (via Hyperallergic)

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