Get Social:

Branded: Michael Murphy Creates A Floating Human Portrait Out Of 100 Laser-Cut Logos

Michael Murphy - Sculpture, installation Michael Murphy - Sculpture, installation Michael Murphy - Sculpture, installation

Michael Murphy is a Brooklyn-based artist known for his perception-challenging sculptural installations. Featured here is a new work titled “Branded,” commissioned by the Manhattan creative consultancy Lippincott. In an exploration of the term “brand identity,” Murphy used 100 laser-cut images of graphic logos to create a human face—more specifically, the face of his daughter, Iris Isadora. Portions of her photo where printed across each logo. From a distance, the image appears complete; move closer, however, and the portions break apart into distinct logos—Starbucks, Instagram, and KFC among them. Watch the video above and see how the installation changes form depending on one’s vantage point.

Lippincott believes that a company’s brand represents not only an identity, but a possibility; “it is who you are and who you aspire to be” (Source). By constructing a human face out of logos, Murphy’s work intends to represent how brands themselves can function similar to living entities, changing and growing along with the cultural trends. The fact that perspective changes the form and cohesion of the installation suggests that one’s own experience of a brand can function within a subjective framework.

In addition to Lippincott, Murphy’s other clientele have included TIME Magazine, Washington Life, and Art for Obama. For the past two years he has been collaborating with Michael Jordan and Nike in the creation of retail centerpieces for the Jordan Brand. View Murphy’s website to learn more. Isadora is a musician whose work can be heard here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Alicia Martín’s Cascading Book Installations

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín

aliciamartin9

Alicia Martín (formerly featured here – as well as in our Best of 2012) has kept busy this year, expanding on her signature style of cascading book installations that we first saw in BiografíasEach installation begins as a wire and aluminum structure, to which hundreds and thousands of books are attached, creating the illusion of waterfalls of pages and spines wrapping around objects, wrapping around themselves, and pouring from windows and underneath walls.

In works such as Singularidad, the Madrid, Spain-based artist focuses her waves of books into a more circular shape, resembling a vortex rather than a waterfall. Playing with the idea of a black-hole, or naked singularity, the collective swathe of books consumes itself, rather than bursting forward. In Contemporaneos, Martín plays with the idea of the books being the background, the support, or what’s behind the object, pouring out of (or cracking through) a wall – engaging in a dialogue with more indoor, site-specific contemporary installation. However, Martín continues to re-imagine her waterfalls, with newer pieces expanding on previous work’s pouring from buildings, as well as running down streets, through windows and around trees, with pages blowing in the wind at each amazing installation. (via mymodernmet)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Richard Wilson turns the place over

The most daring piece of public art ever commissioned in the UK, Turning the Place Over is artist Richard Wilson’s most radical intervention into architecture to date, turning a building in Liverpool’s city centre literally inside out. It runs in daylight hours, triggered by a light sensor. The piece consists of an 8 metres diameter ovoid cut from the façade of a building in Liverpool city centre and made to oscillate in three dimensions, resting on a giant rotator usually used in the shipping and nuclear industries, it cts as a huge opening and closing ‘window’, offering recurrent glimpses of the interior during its constant cycle during daylight hours. Amazing!

Currently Trending

Women’s Vulnerability Is Studied In Karen Ann Myers’ Paintings From Up Above

karenannmyers paintingkarenannmyers paintingkarenannmyers paintingkarenannmyers painting
Karen Ann Myers’ latest series of paintings study the vulnerability of women. Through a series of motifs showing women lying down on beds or in different sexual acts disguised within a pattern, she examines the feminine form in its most naked form. What she offers is a voyeuristic look at womanhood. By taking the girl next door and putting her in subjective, fetal-like positions we see how the packaging of the fairer sex becomes more about mood and positioning than the actual model. The atmosphere and attire become the most important elements in her psychological study. It cleverly examines women’s submissive behavior in advertising and brings forth what society is shown as desirable.
In large sized paintings, Myers purposely places vibrantly colored rugs and sheets next to her subjects commenting on the fact that women are seen as beautiful pieces of furniture used to adorn a room. They become objectified and meld into the foreground. Her message is subtle disguised through a series of striking images that recall Alex Katz and David Hockney.
Her wallpaper drawings of various sexual positions disclose the powerful nature of women’s sexuality. Hidden from direct view in the design’s make up her project speaks to the meaning of subliminal messages. As the pattern dictates, the true nature of  women’s sexuality should remain secret as media and advertising suggests.  Her prowess as a painter and designer is only matched by her strong desire to speak about these important issues.

Currently Trending

26 Choreographed Performers Come Together To Create The Most Striking Video You’ll See Today

Dimitris Papaioannou - Nowhere 2009

Dimitris Papaioannou - Nowhere 2009

Dimitris Papaioannou - Nowhere 2009

Greek director, choreographer, visual artist and performer Dimitris Papaioannou has caught our attention with this strikingly simple video. Just under 4 minutes long, it is a short clip of the central segment of his longer show Nowhere (2009). Ominously lit, and eerily quiet, it is a strange experience to watch. The whole piece was performed by 26 people and is a testament to just how well Papaioannou can direct bodies to create unified, seamless actions. The arms of the performers stop looking like separate limbs belonging to humans and more like giant tentacles, or something very alien indeed. The arms are either moving on their own accord or in harmony with something unseen. It is both wondrous and unsettling to watch the action unfold.

Papaioannou is no stranger to directing large numbers of people performing synchronized movements. He has also co-ordinated the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2004 Athens Olympic Games. As we know, these shows are a finely tuned ballet of thousands of interconnected bodies and continuously changing patterns (the closing ceremony alone had more than 3500 performers).

His focus on composition and the overall harmony on stage probably owes itself to his training as a painter. Papaioannou has for a long time been interested in gestures; how the body influences mark making; or how we are able to express an emotion through the use of our skin and bones. Gradually though, he was drawn toward the immediacy of performing, and fell in love with the theatricality of the stage.

As a painter, [the Edofos Dance Theatre] was the place to create images; as a comics artist, this was where to tell my tales; and as a performer, this was the context in which to present myself. Furthermore, as I was to discover over time, this was the territory in which to inspire people, exercising my skills as a team leader. (Source)

Currently Trending

Le Goff & Gabarra

Le Goff and Gabarra

Le Goff & Gabarra is a design agency based in Paris. Their work demonstrates an understanding of bold colors and strong typography. I’m partial to their physical typographic works, especially their work for 6 scope. That 6 made out of water looks pleasantly scientific (check that one out after the jump). Good job to you Le Goff & Gabarra, keep ’em comin’!

Currently Trending

Liza Lou’s Incredible Sculptures And Room Sized Installations Created Out Of Beads

Liza Lou - installation

Liza Lou - installation

Photo Credit: Tom Powell

Photo Credit: Tom Powell

Liza Lou’s art making process seems a bit obsessive, to say the least.  She first came on the art radar when she exhibited Kitchen (1991-96), at the New Museum of Contemporary Art.  A 168 sq. ft. beaded “kitchen” that took five years to create and incorporated 30 million beads, Lou created the ultimate homage to the domestic.  The space contained beaded walls, tables, cereal boxes, etc. –everything created from glass beads.

In 2002, at age 32, Lou was awarded the MacArthur “genius” award.  In 2005 she founded a collective with Zulu artisans in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.  Although she doesn’t incorporate specifically African beadwork tradition, she finds within it a commonality in the process of working with beads.  Creating her works becomes a kind of meditation—the final products representing the impossibility of perfection—something Lou refers to as “the culpability of craft.”

Much less showy and, if not for the same medium, actually completely different, I am actually more drawn to Lou’s recent works.  Minimalist and hauntingly beautiful, they appear to be Agnes Martin’s, or Ellsworth Kelly’s re-imagined as beaded canvases.  And because of the beads there is a delicate, feminine sensibility to them.  They walk the line between fine art and craft without needing to be one or the other.  With them, Lou has fully embraced her method as meditation, placing process over content (although the final products are still pretty wonderful).

 

Currently Trending

Tisha Cherry Forms Miniature Masterpieces Out Of Oreos And Icing

Tisha Cherry - Icing and OreosTisha Cherry - Icing and OreosTisha Cherry - Icing and OreosTisha Cherry - Icing and Oreos

Food artist Tisha Cherry takes iconic masterpieces of incredible artists and makes them even sweeter. By using just different colored icing and black or white Oreo cookies, Cherry replicates the work of such artists as Henry Matisse and Frida Kahlo on the inside of the treat. Creating art on a small scale is a difficult task in itself, but to use icing as your medium adds a whole different level of complexity. Cherry even forms a little painting palette out of delicious dessert elements to go along with her cookie creations. Her Oreo art emulates a wide range of different artistic styles. One cookie has a clouded eye from the work of surrealist artist Rene Magritte, while another contains a post-expressionist landscape by Van Gogh. There is even some recognizable contemporary icing art, including the happy faces of artist Takashi Murakami.

Tisha Cherry does not only create miniature, sweet creations that resemble famous pieces of art. She has also done iconic movie posters such as Jaws, grumpy cat, rainbows, and even Mr. Monopoly. Other food art of hers does not even use cookies at all. She has made Bert and Ernie from eggs and bacon, Calvin and Hobbs from peanut butter and jelly, and Van Gogh’s Starry Night out of candy. You can see more of Tisha Cherry’s tasty, fun food art by following her Instagram. (via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending