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Romina Ressia’s Real Life Superheroes Are Vulnerable and Relatably Human

The Story behind Snow White: On september 18th, the day of the shooting, Cornelia was celebrating her 94th birthday. She traveled 500 km to celebrate that day here in Buenos Aires, with almost 50 relatives. She arrived to the shooting with Pilar, her granddaughter. And I couldn't believe that woman was that age! She is adorable, with a contagious energy. Mother of 12 children, having lost 6 of them, she grew up in the countryside and has had a strong life. However, she keeps such a great attitude & sense of humour. She is that kind of people who makes you to realize how beautiful life is.

The Story behind Snow White:
On september 18th, the day of the shooting, Cornelia was celebrating her 94th birthday. She traveled 500 km to celebrate that day here in Buenos Aires, with almost 50 relatives.
She arrived to the shooting with Pilar, her granddaughter. And I couldn’t believe that woman was that age! She is adorable, with a contagious energy.
Mother of 12 children, having lost 6 of them, she grew up in the countryside and has had a strong life. However, she keeps such a great attitude & sense of humour.
She is that kind of people who makes you to realize how beautiful life is.

The Story behind Superman: That wednesday, when I opened the door, there was a tall man impeccably dressed, in a grey suit. His name is Nestor, a 75 years old man, widower since 2 years ago after having been married for 41 years. Losing the partner of his life made him to realize that he must do something to continue, and that was how he discovered the passion about acting, singing and dancing. He is a very polite man, and his energy is admirable. At the age of 75, he does exercise every day and enjoys working, more for fun than for money. He is such an interesting person!

The Story behind Superman:
That wednesday, when I opened the door, there was a tall man impeccably dressed, in a grey suit. His name is Nestor, a 75 years old man, widower since 2 years ago after having been married for 41 years. Losing the partner of his life made him to realize that he must do something to continue, and that was how he discovered the passion about acting, singing and dancing.
He is a very polite man, and his energy is admirable. At the age of 75, he does exercise every day and enjoys working, more for fun than for money.
He is such an interesting person!

The Story behind Wonder Woman: I met Virginia more than 7 years ago, when she started taking care of Lorenzo, my 8 years old godson. Now she is like his grandmother. Mother of two sons and married for almost 40 years, she came to Buenos Aires at her 15 years old. Since that moment she never stopped work. I knew she would be happy to do this photographs, she is so smily and funny person; she is always ready to help and really knows how to enjoy life. I think I never saw her with bad humour in all these years...That is why I choose her to be Wonder Woman.

The Story behind Wonder Woman:
I met Virginia more than 7 years ago, when she started taking care of Lorenzo, my 8 years old godson. Now she is like his grandmother.
Mother of two sons and married for almost 40 years, she came to Buenos Aires at her 15 years old. Since that moment she never stopped work.
I knew she would be happy to do this photographs, she is so smily and funny person; she is always ready to help and really knows how to enjoy life. I think I never saw her with bad humour in all these years…That is why I choose her to be Wonder Woman.

Romina Ressia - Photograph

Romina Ressia set out to confront the realities of life and the fallibility of our childhood inspirations in her series “Not About Death”.  The captions record her relationship to her subjects and her reasoning for casting them as each character. They are humorous portraits – especially when set up beside each other in the poster format – and the humour makes them that much more appealing as true figures of inspiration.

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An Imaginary City Of Famous Artists’ Buildings

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Italian architect and illustrator Federico Babina has created 27 fantasy buildings that meld famous artists and the places where they might live. The series “Archist City” is a clever melding of cross-sectional drawings of buildings and the signature styles of artists including Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst, Pablo Picasso, Keith Haring, Joan Miró, Josef Albers, and Piet Mondrian. The result is a cohesive group of easily identifiable buildings—in fact, pairing the artist with the correct drawing is part of the fun.

“Art, architecture and sculpture are historically linked by an unbreakable thread, we find examples of paintings and sculptures having a direct influence on architectural design. … Painting sculpture and architecture have always been complementary disciplines that influence each other and feed to grow and develop along common paths.”

Babina’s skilled artwork makes this look easy, but in actuality first fitting the artists’ iconic styles into an architectural framework, then keeping all of the buildings consistent in execution is the mark of a very skilled artist. Some of the artists play well together: Mondrian and Albers and Rothko for example. Others would seem to defy architecture, like Dali, Haring, and Miro, yet Babina has brought them into his imaginary cityscape. The identical background texture and color, font, and scale relative to the paper help tie the pieces together.

The silhouetted figures help sell these as buildings instead of artworks and the cross-cuts reveal wonderful details: Andy Warhol’s building includes soup cans and his Marilyn Monroe paintings; the huge shark in Damien’s Hirst’s building references his 1991 work “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living.”

“These images represent an imaginary and imagined world of shapes that uses the brush to paint architecture.”

What fun it would be to inhabit this world of huge imaginations, awesome ability, and lasting artistic legacy.

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DXV PRESENTS: THE INFLUENTIAL ART OF THE GOLDEN ERA

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DXV by American Standard is a landmark product line that represents the company’s storied history spanning 150 years. The collection spans four broad movements: Classic (1880 – 1920), Golden Era (1920 – 1950), Modern (1950 – 1990), and Contemporary (1990 – today).  Each piece in the carefully curated collection harkens back to the era it was inspired by and combines it with modern sensibilities, technology and performance. Although each fixture is inspired by a distinct era, the entire collection has a dialogue and the ability to cross over and create a remix of eras in one space.

The Fitzgerald Collection by DXV perfectly encapsulates the beauty and lines of the 1920’s Jazz Age. The faucets, sinks and fixtures echo the rectilinear, geometric forms and shapes that ruled the Art Deco aesthetic. Artists, designers and aesthetes have always had a love affair with the opulent finishes, bold lines and flair of the Art Deco era, and the Fitzgerald Collection gives the modern home owner the finishes to create a sumptuous and inspired space.

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Lucia Giacani’s Interesting-Yet-Bizarre Fashion Photos Of Models And Animal Anatomy

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Italian fashion photographer Lucia Giacani’s series Under My Skin shows just what kind of editorial liberties are taken in this interesting-yet-bizarre photoshoot. Originally shot for Vogue Italy, the colorful images feature a high-fashion model clothed in gorgeous garments while she dons unconventionally-colored makeup. It complements the props used in the photo; surrounding her are medical anatomy of the animal kingdom. Rabbits, goats, and chickens are all halved so we can see their insides.

Giacani’s photographic style is very clear and visual. Nothing is hidden in obscurity, and we see a lot of interesting details in the spotlight. The juxtaposition of the two main elements – the woman and the anatomy – creates a strange narrative. It makes us ask ourselves questions, like, who is this person? How do the two seemingly disparate subjects relate to one another? It’s this ambiguity that makes for a compelling and ultimately unforgettable image. (Via Illusion)

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Edgar Romanovskis’ Vertigo-Inducing Landscapes Draw Toward Infinity

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Swiss artist Edgar Romanovskis uses simple digital editing techniques to portray the illusion of infinity within his outdoor portraiture. Starting with a hand-made frame, he photographs an outdoor scene either holding or setting the frame in it, then manipulates the image in Photoshop to mirror the frame endlessly, forming a geometric gateway that sinks into oblivion. The results are captivating.

Much of his previous work involves landscape photography, with heavy use of photo manipulation to pull at the tones and contrast, achieving the fullest impact with the image, and creating a nearly other-worldly look. In comparison to that type of work, this series, titled “Concept of Infinity,” has a beautifully muted and nearly fine art quality to it. The tones are even, and although the patterns are simple there is a nearly entrancing quality to them. This is a simple way to turn a beautiful landscape photograph into something that appears to fall into another dimension.

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Mesmerizing Wall Patterns Cast By Intricate Shadows

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Mixed media artist Anila Quayyum Agha has figured out how to decorate an entire room with shadows cast from a box. Laser cutting intricate patterns into a wooden cube, a light within the cube projects an intricate display of shadows that envelope the entire room in ornate design. The results are breathtaking and the philosophy behind her work is fascinating.

This project, titled “Intersections,” combines the patterning of Islamic sacred spaces with architectural aesthetics:

“The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. For me the familiarity of the space visited at the Alhambra Palace and the memories of another time and place from my past, coalesced in creating this project. My intent with this installation was to give substance to mutualism, exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence within a public space.”

(Excerpt from Source)

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Artist Defies Gravity And Makes Building Appear To Float

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Architectural artist Alex Chinneck has turned heads this week in Covent Garden by making it look as if the top part of the Market Building in the piazza is floating in mid air. From all angles it seems as if the building is hovering above it’s foundations, not joined to any part of the base. Not only is it an impressive optical illusion, but also a display of amazing technical ability. Taking over 8 months to plan and involving at least 50 people, this project has been a logistical feat. The actual materials used in the replication includes digitally carved polystyrene that has been distressed by scenic artists and attached to hidden beams. Chinneck’s technical team worked over 4 days to help install the trickery, cladding plaster around structures to look like stone columns and inspecting the finish on the paintwork.

Playfully titled Take My Lightning But Don’t Steal My Thunder, Chinneck makes sense of the installation in this way:

“there are things which always come together but are always slightly apart….the shape of the crack was reminiscent of the lightning bolt. It’s a very cataclysmic scene.” (Source)

Known for his gravity-defying architectural projects, Chinneck also created an awe-inspiring installation last October in Margate. Called From The Knees Of My Nose To The Belly Of My Toes, that project involved a brick facade that appeared to separate from it’s roof and slide down into the garden in front of the apartment block. He has also “flipped” old livery stables in Southwark – recreating the windows and door frames, but around the wrong way. Chinneck seems addicted to talking on these overwhelmingly complex projects, but thinks of them in quite a different way:

“The idea itself is actually quite simple. I don’t get too bogged down in concept or meaning or message. It is what it is. It’s playful and fun.” (Source)

Via (It’s Nice That)

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Andy freeberg’s Touching Portraits Of The Art Guardians In Russian Museums

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Andy Freeberg takes photographs of the women who watch over the artwork at Russian Art Museums. Often the women seem to emulate the artwork themselves. Whether this is controlled by Freeberg for his portraits or a natural phenomenon is unclear, but it adds an extra layer of poetry to the photographs. In one, a woman sits beside a case of heads, and her own expression mimics that of the 2nd century mummies beside her. In another, the blue of the woman’s shirt is identical to the patter in the painting above her. The women speak about their attachments to the paintings they guard, and whether it is conscious or not, it would appear the artwork has a deep impact on them.

Freeberg explains his interest in the women:

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

(Via I Need a Guide)

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