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Peter Pincus’ 3D-Paintings In The Form Of Ceramic Pots

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Peter Pincus is a New York-based ceramic artist whose relatively simple forms are punctuated by blocks of color. The clean and modern pots, urns, and cups are mostly gray with accents of blue, yellow, salmon, and more that are laid side by side in thin strips. Occasionally, gold lines the edges.

The forms are very structured, as are their designs. Colors are evenly portioned and thin lines, contrasting-colored divide gray sections of the ceramics. If we were to remove the surface designs from the clay, they could stand alone as abstract paintings. And, that’s partially the point of Pincus’ work. He writes in an artist statement:

I produce three-dimensional paintings out of pots. The studio challenge is to determine a way to create containers that belong not only on the dinner table, but also elsewhere in the home. Many of my pots are status symbols saved for special occasions, generally deemed distinct because of the value of what they hold rather than for what they are. But to me, in between such occasions, they become canvases that visually illustrate the defining spirit of the times, despite their being utilitarian and made of clay, not canvas. They still need to do their job; to be genuine, they must be functional as well as opulent. But they can be so much more.

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Powerfully Disturbing And Certainly Controversial Art By The Kid

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Powerfully disturbing, and certainly controversial, the art that 22-year old artist The Kid creates spans genres. He describes his work as “forever caught between innocence and corruption,” and the well-executed pieces are compelling with their huge, detailed, Bic pen-drawn faces and hyper-realistic sculpted bodies. Photos of his sculptures, made from materials such as platinum silicon, glass fiber, oil paint, human hair, cotton, and mixed fabrics, force you to look, and look again, in order to believe that they are, in fact, inanimate objects.

In his latest work, The Kid is influenced by bullying inflicted on him by fellow students and teachers when he was younger. The sculpture “Do you believe in God?” which depicts the artist kneeling and holding a gun in his own mouth, was in response to the Columbine killers, who he feels he understands and sees as “victims of a social context.”

“All subjects of my drawings for the exhibition “endgame” really exist and are currently being held in prison-even in the United States-with exactly these tattoos. They are not imaginary and no detail is invented. They are all serving life sentences without the possibility of parole, until they die in prison. There is no other hope for them-a life in adult prison at the beginning of their sentence, that’s all, even though they have been convicted of violent crimes they committed before the age of 18.” (Source)

It’s clear that The Kid empathizes with these stigmatized subjects and hopes to give them back some humanity by evoking compassion from the viewer. Many share his view that social determinism condemns people from birth because of their familial circumstances, but by depicting, in such a graphic way, a sampling of those who are affected, he brings attention to the issue. It’s not empty sentiment, either. The Kid donated a portion of the profits from this work to the non-profit organization Human Rights Watch, which defends the rights of people worldwide. (Via yatzer)

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Sven Sachsalber Literally Looks For A Needle In A Haystack As Part Of 24 Hour Performance

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While, to most, the phrase “looking for a needle in a haystack” is merely a humdrum idiom, to performance artist Sven Sachsalber, it’s a challenge. That is why Sachsalber opted to devote 24 hours to handpicking his way through a pile of hay set in the Palais de Tokyo. The entire performance was documented as a video on a live feed, and–spoiler alert!–18 hours passed before the artist finally found the elusive bodkin.

While, as in the case of Looking for a Needle in the Haystack, Sachsalber tends to gravitate toward performance art, he also shows an inclination toward sculpture, film, and photography–a fact that is worth noting when considering this recent project.  By placing an enormous haystack within the context of an art museum and filming himself interacting with it, the artist inadvertently transforms the mound into a piece that transcends traditional artistic description.

Galerie Rianne Groen describes his ourvre as “often funny, often serious and sometimes both,” and emphasizes that “his works have a universal poetic element that does not need much explanation.” And, with this literal, almost tongue-in-cheek interpretation of such a tried and true figure of speech, this statement undoubtedly holds true. (Via Hypebeast)

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Bela Borsodi’s Balloon Caricatures Pose For The Camera In These Ridiculously Cute Portraits

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Bela Borsodi is a prolific image maker. And not only does he make brightly colored, cartoonish images by taking photos of balloons wearing funny costumes. Since 1999 he has been taking photographs of still lifes full of humor, optical illusions, weird proportions, color play, and whimsical objects. His work may look like child’s play, but his clients have included Vogue Russia, Bloomingdales, H&M, Puma, Target, Hermes and Swarovski. His hilarious campaigns feature sunglasses casually draped on blocks of cheese, faces made out of folded clothes, outfits worn by invisible people and masked figures juggling shoes. The Austrian photographer says:

I love making things and putting things in an unusual context incorporating various visual languages coming from art and graphic design–eroticism is also a fascination of me that I love exploring. (Source)

Borsodi has a knack for turning the plainest things into something surreal and wonderful. By simply styling, or suggesting a few details, he can animate mundane objects into jovial caricatures. Add a wig to a balloon and it is no longer an inflated bit of latex, but now it is suddenly transformed into Marge Simpson. Or add a few brooches and faux fur to pink balloon, and we go from a child’s party to a drag show. Or another one: just fasten a tie, a belt, wrap on sunglasses and place a pile of string on a strangely shaped balloon, and we now see a boss trying to party on Casual Friday. Borsodi goes on:

Often when you only change the context of things you can find new meaning. Or you add something to an object or you take something away from it. Or you put it upside down. All this can change it – a glass put upside down loses all its original function and becomes just a “thing”. (Source)

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Sean Landers’ Sexual Characters And Rants About The Art World

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Sean Landers creates sometimes proud, other times dejected characters with oddly proportioned or placed body parts. Their exaggerated features help to communicate the absurdity Landers seems to see all around us. For instance, the tiny naked butterfly-eared man that stands in front of a microphone as if to try to be heard. It’s a strange proposition.

Much of Landers’ work is covered in handwritten text. It’s difficult to discern in the digital image, but the breasts with rabbit ears, aptly titled “bunny boobs” begins:

“This is preposterous, this Landers is an outrage does he expect us to take him seriously? Not only does he mock modernism but he also writes his mindless drivel all over each of his abominations. I have never read such vapid writing in my life, and his paintings are bad student work. I look at his resume and find he’s been exhibiting all around the globe for the last decade. Has everyone gone mad? Or is it that our standards have been eroded to the point that a hack like Mr. Landers is a celebrated international art star.”

The outraged tone of the fictional art critic is Landers’ response to reception of his work. He ends by saying:

“I get to vent, my paintings get better, they sell, I get confident, bash critics, they bash me back, sales stop, then I have to start over again.”

It’s not clear if this is an invented scenario, or a pattern that Landers often experiences, but certainly this kind of self-deprecating voice flows through his characters as well as in his text. Still, “bunny boob” is smiling out at the viewer (or critic) which makes it seem that it’s ultimately teasing, and maybe more lighthearted than the attitude the text sets.

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Sandra Franco’s Poignant And Revealing Photos Tell The Stories Of Scars

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It sounds cliche, but scars really do tell stories. They speak of things like accidents, turbulent periods in our lives, and the road to recovery. Sometimes scars have funny origin stories and other times tragic ones. Photographer Sandra Franco explores these permanent body marks in her aptly-titled series, Scars. The quiet, intimate images feature people with these blemishes on their bodies, which are now apart of their physical personal history. Some are more noticeable than others, and on backs, arms, and even the neck. Franco explains Scars, writing:

Memory can be fragile and people find particular ways of holding on to it. Due to their strong evocative power, there is an evident connection between photographs and memories which I find fascinating. In this sense I observe a few parallelisms between scars and photography.

 

They share not only an aesthetic value, both being affected by the idea of “beauty”, but also an organic quality. Film ages and changes its properties in a similar way our body does, more visible through the marks, wrinkles and eventual scars left in our skin with the passing of time.

Thus, while taking a picture of a particular moment in time, light “scars” the negative, which once developed becomes a reminder of the past event. Some dramatic experiences, positive or negative, leave a physical trace on our bodies made visible through scars.

 

For me, scars are able to bring experiences from the past to the present moment,acting like “prints of memory”, just like photographs do.

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Peter Stichbury’s Unsettling Clone-Like Portraits

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Hyper-realism reaches a point of surreal alienation in New Zealand-born Peter Stichbury’s paintings. These alienated and alienating faces, doll-like and expressionless, detail what could be a new race of clones, mannequins, or digitally rendered animations. Well-dressed, exceedingly manicured, completely devoid of facial emotion, their middle gaze lost on an unknown point, they carry an unsettling quality about them. Too clean and too polished, there is an unwelcoming aspect permeating from their presence. They emit either ennui or psychopathy, but it’s hard to tell which, and the need to sort that distinction is a major part of the allure with his work; trying to articulate the intention of the face staring out becomes the major connecting point. But don’t stare too long…

His work, as summarized on Artspace:

“Peter Stichbury’s portraits of wide-eyed, flawlessly polished, and sharply dressed figures are both captivating and uncanny. Stichbury employs a cool color palette—icy grey for the eyes, mannequin-cream for the skin—expelling all traces of human warmth or internal, emotional activity. Despite their manicured appearances, the figures avert their eyes as if nervous or insecure. Like the generic representations of celebrities and other public figures from which the artist culls some of his subjects, the images he produces incite stifling feelings of isolation and alienation. Painted with stunning precision, Stichbury’s painting technique invites comparison to airbrushing and the compulsive obsession with cultivating the perfect public image. ” (Excerpt from Source)

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Joseph DeLappe Proves Money Is Power By Imprinting Bills With Drones

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Specializing in digital media, artist and professor Joseph DeLappe boasts a diverse background. While his portfolio features seemingly traditional experience in painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, and curatorial work, it also presents more inventive undertakings, titled “interventions/actions.” Spanning social media experiments and fake newspaper articles, this distinctive body of work is entirely political, with the most recent project, In Drones We Trust, featuring paper money as its platform.

Described as a “crowd sourced, participatory rubber stamp currency intervention,”  In Drones We Trust calls for volunteers all across America to brand their bills with a tiny stamp depicting an MQ1 Predator Drone. DeLappe explains:

The idea came after closely examining U.S. currency – all but the $1 dollar bill feature a pastoral depiction of a notable government building or monument on the back of the bills, albeit with lonely, empty skies. It seems appropriate, considering our current use of drones in foreign skies, to symbolically bring them home to fly over our most notable patriotic structures.

Subtle enough to blend in with their printed surroundings but graphic enough to stand out, the colorful marks stamped on the notes succeed as both an aesthetic addition and as a political statement. By adorning paper currency with these controversial and heavily symbolic imprints, DeLappe is able to both stealthily spread his message and get his art into circulation—literally. (Via Vandalog)

To join the cause and put your money where your mouth is, get your own drone stamp here!

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