Get Social:

Gavin Munro Plants Trees That Grow Into Furniture

Gavin Munro - tree furnitureGavin Munro - tree furnitureGavin Munro - tree furniture

Carpenter, furniture designer and innovator Gavin Munro is heading a project called Full Grown that is achieving incredible things. He and his team have an ambitious and revolutionary idea of growing trees around frames and supports that will shape them into chairs, tables, mirror frames, and light shades. The process takes a few years, but ultimately saves on labor and time when it comes to chopping, harvesting, sanding, polishing and finishing the furniture.

The idea for Full Grown started when, as a young boy, Munro saw an overgrown bonsai tree that looked remarkably like a chair. In a strange twist of fate, he then needed a back brace to help straighten his spine. With the time to mull over a few things, he put these different experiences together with his expertise in furniture making to try something new.

It’s where I learnt patience. There were long periods of staying still, plenty of time to observe what was going on and reflect.  It was only after doing this project for a few years a friend pointed out that I must know exactly what it’s like to be shaped and grafted on a similar time scale. (Source)

So treating wood the same way his own bones were treated, he experimented with growing different prototypes. After a couple of attempts with willow trees, Munro now has almost 3,000 trees growing into furniture on 2.5 acres. The first pieces will be ready in Spring 2016 and you can pre order different pieces here. Obviously, each piece is unique and unrepeatable, all marked and with a Certificate of Provenance. Ultimately Munro hopes to achieve a new understanding of wood and it’s brilliance.

I hope that our work highlights what it takes to make the objects we surround ourselves with, and that no one looks at trees in quite the the same way again. (Source)

(Via The Creator’s Project)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Child-Sized Mannequins With Projected Faces Portray Displacement In The Photographs Of Ursula Sokolowska

Ursula_Sokolowska photographyUrsula_Sokolowska photographyUrsula_Sokolowska photographyUrsula_Sokolowska photography

If you had a sad childhood and wanted to make art about it look no further. Urusla Sokolowska has already done it for you. Taking child-sized mannequins and projecting images of her young face onto to them she explores the displacement and alienation she felt as a kid immigrating to the US from her native Poland. In her series The Constructed Family her messages are subtly and darkly humorous. By placing the figure in locations which do not hold cheerful memories for Sokolowska, we are reminded that art does indeed have cathartic powers and is a positive way to confront our demons. Her locations speak for themselves; a basement, a lonely street corner, a neighbor’s house, an alleyway, a bed. These domestic scenes which provoke unhappy memories are powerfully done from the perspective of an innocent child. Displacement is a serious feeling and perhaps even worse for a child who doesn’t have much control over their situation.

In moody dim lit photos, Sokolowska projects what she remembers from that time. Titles give hints but to the observer it’s clearly obvious what she’s thinking. We always hear about happy childhoods or outright abusive childhoods. Rarely do we hear about sad childhoods caused by normal occurrences that happen to families every day. Sokolowska brings this new dynamic to life with her powerful thought provoking images.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Lorraine Loots’ Microscopic Watercolor Paintings Of The Cosmic Universe The Size Of Your Thumbnail

Lorraine Loots - WatercolorLorraine Loots - WatercolorLorraine Loots - WatercolorLorraine Loots - Watercolor

Can you imagine trying to fit images of the cosmic universe into a circle only an inch, inch and a half wide? Artist Lorraine Loots accomplishes this with nothing more than watercolors and an incredible eye for detail. Watercolor is known for its unpredictable nature and organic qualities. Being able to control this medium in a realistic manner in such a small space speaks volumes to Loots artistic skill.  She renders her miniatures paintings on themed days throughout the year, completion date included.

In the series titled Microcosm Mondays, extremely tiny watercolor paintings depicting celestial images of outer space are created, one of which is a reference to a real photograph taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This project gives us other equally clever names, each with their own mini-series. These include Tiny Tuesdays, Free Fridays, and with a play on words, Fursdays. Each series having a different theme, guess what this artist draws on Fursdays… cute little furry animals! All so incredibly detailed, down to the last hair and whisker. Each series is drawn on different days of the week, and at the end of the year, a total of 100 microscopic paintings will be completed. What makes Loot’s small masterpieces even more fun is that once one is completed, it is auctioned off on Instagram! So now there not only an element of surprise what day she will post her delicate piece, but also a factor of chance as you bid to have one for yourself. Don’t miss the action and check out Loots Instagram here. (via MyModernMet)

Currently Trending

Dan McPharlin’s Sci Fi Illustrations Of Past FUtures

Dan McPharlin - Illustration Dan McPharlin - Illustration Dan McPharlin - Illustration
Dan McPharlin - Illustration

Dan McPharlin
 is an illustrator who is concerned with the “future past or past future,” as he notes on his webpage. His artwork live in a realm of speculative reality, where space is the final frontier — or perhaps the first of a civilization beginning to rebuild itself.
There are dystopian touches in his illustrations: in one, an astronaut gazes on temple ruins; in another, we see the haggard remnants of a bridge that looks like it used to be golden. It’s a little reminiscent of the final scenes of Planet of the Apes, a familiar monument from a world long lost. McPharlin’s work utilizes rich colors that are once neon yet muted. His palette is one that includes the golden rod yellow of futuristic smog as well as the earth tones of somewhere decidedly not-Earth. There is certainly a quality of nostalgia to his work, though for what, we don’t necessarily know.
“These are the worlds of dreams and half-memories,” McPharlin says on his webpage. “The collision zone of past-futures and futures-past, derived from blueprints laid down decades earlier on the pages of battered sci-fi paperbacks, fantasy art books, and mid-century design quarterlies.” (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Currently Trending

BARE USA: Photographer Brian Cattelle’s Nation-Wide Project Contrasts Nude Beauty With Manmade Decay

Brian Cattelle, BARE USA - Photography

Searsboro Consolidated School (Searsboro, IA)

Brian Cattelle, BARE USA - Photography

The Ghost Town of Welcott (Welcott, WY)

Brian Cattelle, BARE USA - Photography

Nike Missile Base PH-58 (Swedesboro, NJ)

Brian Cattelle, BARE USA - Photography

Fort Gorges (ME)

Brian Cattelle is an American photographer who has embarked on a nation-wide project to photograph one nude model in each of the USA’s 50 states. Driving his concept is an exploration of the contrast between natural, nude beauty, and the decay of manmade environments; explore his current collection, and you will see female figures integrated within architectural wastelands, the black and white tones highlighting the illumination of soft skin amidst shadowy, shattered rubble. Entitled BARE USA, the project emerged from Cattelle’s desire to challenge himself and his work. In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, he explained:

“I wanted to tackle a project that would prove I was able to work with models in often difficult and uncomfortable situation. I wanted to show I was willing to go to any lengths to get a great shot. I also wanted to show the level of organization, execution, and dedication I was capable of. It seems that my initial intention was to prove these points to others, but in the end the true reward was proving them to myself.”

Part of what makes Cattelle’s project so imaginative and emotionally evocative is his approach to abandoned places. “People often express sadness about some of these great abandoned structures,” Cattelle observed. “They don’t make me feel sad. Change is change […]. I do find myself captivated by a sense of awe and wonder when I soak in my surroundings. I think about how much effort went in to building these places, how much work took place here, and how quickly that can be lost.” By incorporating nude models, Cattelle reinvests desolate spaces with hope and optimism for the future. As he concludes, “I think my work is important because I am creating art and bringing something beautiful to this world by injecting new life into these dead and forgotten structures.”

Last summer, Cattelle completed successful shoots in 30 states, and is working on completing the final 20. If you like his concept, check out his Kickstarter project. There, you can learn more, make a pledge, and receive beautiful fine art prints in return. Visit Cattelle’s website, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to see more of his work and follow him on his journey.

Currently Trending

Sophie Derrick’s Colorful, Layered Self Portraits Created By Painting Directly Onto Her Skin

sophie-derrick-1 sophie-derrick-6 sophie-derrick-4 sophie-derrick-3

British artist Sophie Derrick paints directly onto her skin and adds colorful layers of swirling pigment to her face and neck. Once she’s completed it, she’ll photograph the result and then paint onto that image. The result is a multi-layered, textured portrait that gives the viewer an incredible sense of depth. Derrick’s painting style is abstract – focusing on bright pinks, blues, oranges, and more – and she’ll vary how the paint is applied. It often looks like she uses a palette knife to make thick, frosting-like strokes, but she’ll also use the paint tube to draw lines on the skin.

“I have a great interest in the materiality and substance of paint, and execute this interest through photography, creating a juxtaposition of the two mediums,” Derrick writes. “My body becomes the canvas for the paint, questioning the traditional concept of painting and portraiture, and the barriers between painting and photography. The body becomes both object and subject in the work.” (Via Art Fucks Me)

Currently Trending

Jason Borders’ Carves Insanely Detailed Patterns Into Animal Skulls And Bones

Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones Jason Borders - Engraved Bones

Jason Borders has been collecting different animal skulls from before he started school. Always looking for more objects to add to his cabinet of curiosities, he explored his local neighborhoods picking up bits of bones and cartilage. Years later, he has turned that obsession into an art form, showcasing his talent in galleries, shops and collections around the country. He carves patterns and designs that resemble traditional Mehndi tattoos. He usually lets the shape of the skull or bone that he is working on dictate the design he carves. He then covers the work in ink or a striking color.

Borders remembers the day his hobby turned a bit more serious with amusement. After discovering the carcass of an elk while in the desert, and loading it all into his car – an action that almost got him arrested, took it back to his garage. There he cleaned the bones and noticed something that helped him take his craft to the next level.

Looking at the Dremel and looking at the bones next to each other, I picked it up and started working on it. The garage was right underneath my house, and I ended up filling the house with bone dust, and made myself really sick and made my wife really angry. Then I did it another four years, but I’m much more careful these days. (Source)

Borders also paints and carves other items, but has a particular affinity toward skulls. He treats his work as a way of overcoming his fears – particularly ones concerning mortality. He says because he is always working with the idea of death – quite literally,  it helps him live his life with intent and purpose. And what a great purpose he has found. (Via Faith Is Toment)

Currently Trending

Artist Turns River Stones Into Meditative Mandalas With Endless Patterns Of Colorful Dots

Elspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on Stone

Australian artist Elspeth McLean takes ordinary ocean rocks and turns them into colorful, geometric Mandalas. Through intense detail and repetitive patterns, the artist finds meditation in painting these found stones with endless acrylic dots. The acrylic paint used on her pocket-sized creations allows her to add an element of dimension in her already layered colors. These intense colors create a palette so crisp and brilliant, it is as if the stones are encrusted with jewels. Painting dots has become so embedded in McLean’s art process, that she even coined the term “Dotillism” to describe her unique style. Each dot that is painted to create her intricate, endless patterns takes an incredible amount of patience and focus. Although completing these Mandala patterns may seem like a difficult task, McLean describes this process as a grounding experience where she can find enjoyment and experience reflection.

The Mandala is a spiritual symbol in Eastern religions that holds meditative properties. It is no wonder McLean has chosen such a strong, healing symbol in her work, as she believes in the healing nature of color and art. She pulls influence from seasons, cosmos, mythology, and ancient art to create her hand-held Mandalas. Her interest in the cosmos can be seen in her stones that are painted not as a geometric pattern, but instead as incredible constellations, still painted in her dotted signature style. An avid traveler, the Australian artist is now living in Canada, gathering inspiration from the new landscapes she perceives throughout her journey. (via Demilked)

Currently Trending