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A Step Closer To Being A Cyborg: Tech Tats Are Cyberpunk Tattoos That Monitor Vitals

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Chaotic Moon, an Austin based software design company, has created cyberpunk “tattoos” that monitor vitals. As a new addition to the “quantified self movement,” Chaotic Moon’s new invention, Tech Tats, invites a creative answer to the Fitbit. Using ATiny microcontrollers and electroconductive tattoo paint, Tech Tats are temporary tattoos that exist directly on the skin and, through sensors, gather information that can measure temperature, heart rate, hydration levels and others of the likes. When connected to a smartphone app via Bluetooth Low Energy, Tech Tats can allow users to keep track of their bodies as well as send data directly to doctors. Unlike it’s predecessors which are wearable devices, Tech Tats offer a lightweight low-key option that can be hidden under clothes if so desired. Or, the on the other hand, Tech Tats also offer the ability to self design a cyberpunk tattoo that can be worn anywhere on skin. The design is still in the prototype phase, however, the company has high hopes for the product. Chaotic Moon aims to some day replace the nuisance of the annual trip to the doctor’s office. They also foresee a use for the military, as they could detect injuries, toxins and other stresses. Another use could transform banking as the microchips could store credit card information within our skin instead our wallets. The product has potential to be a step further to cyborg-hood, just as it’s aesthetic suggests. (via hyperallergic)

 

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Made With Color Presents: Tik Ka Shares His Inner World By Painting Angelic, Heaven Sent Children

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Artists from all over the world choose Made With Color to Create beautiful portfolio websites that set them apart from the pack. With clean layouts, easy to use interface, and drag and drop functions you can build a professional website in minutes. This week, we are pleased to present the embryonic world of  Made With Color user Tik Ka.

It’s a fantasy dreamland we’re entering. Tik Ka is a Chinese artist whose emotions translate in a multitude of soft, joyful colors. He depicts characters which could be aimed to entertain kids. The eyes and expression of his subjects speak a language of empathy, sincerity and gentleness. And even we, as adults, are touched but the vast generosity Tik Ka is offering us.

The work of Tik Ka is also known as “So Ha” Art. A combination of traditional Chinese culture and lovable babies and kids. The artist has incorporated Chinese characteristics with Western elements and Japanese superflat technique. He has created a style of his own, a signature easily recognizable. His most recent work has led him to represent purity and innocence with just a hint of a smile on the children’s faces. They appear angelic and heaven sent.

Before the life journey begins, we have all waited on a platform, gasping for the first breath, opening our eyes and catching a glimpse of the whole new world.  The platform is a place of purity, where only the heartbeat of the mother and the murmur of the outside world can be heard.”

Children’s faces, babies still connected to their mother by an umbilical cord. Tik Ka’s depictions dives our souls into an inviting, delightful and poetic aura.

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Carol Milne Intricately “Knits” Glass To Create Dainty And Beautiful Objects

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Carol Milne is a Seattle-based artist originally from Canada who has been making beautiful “knitted” objects out of glass. A knitter since she was ten and long fascinated by the sculptural arts, Milne invented an interesting glass-forming technique that combines these two passions. First, she wraps the soft glass around a knitting needle to get the coils, which she then unfurls into “stiches.” After that, she interlocks the stitched pieces together to create the knitted texture. Each sculpture is an experiment in color, resulting in everything from pastel hues to rainbow gradients. Watch this video from Heather DiPietro for a longer description of her process.

Milne has a lot of experience sculpting with other materials (such as bronze casting and metalwork), but she has always been fascinated by glass. As she states in this article by The Creators Project, “[glass] can take on an infinite number of forms and textures. It can show an interior image and an exterior image simultaneously. It’s translucent and transparent. It plays with light. It looks cool when it’s hot” (Source). Exploring the malleability of her medium, the result is a series of endearing and delicate pieces that change the way we see ordinary knitted objects, enlightening us with new forms of everyday beauty.

Visit Milne’s website and Facebook page to view more of her sculptural work. (Via The Creators Project)

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Jenny Aryton Encapsulates Childhood Memories In Molten Glass

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British artist Jenny Aryton creates “miniature wonderlands captured in molten glass.” Almost like snow globe depictions of every day life, Jenny Aryton’s work physically encapsulates intimate depictions of her private world. Gaining inspiration from her young daughter, she aims to gather excitement from the mundane. Her work tends to have a “domestic twist” as she allows her surrounding of her home and family guide the way as her source imagery. Her process begins by creating small metal wire figurines. She fashions tiny sweaters, chairs, trees, shovels, and other objects found in an everyday family home. She then organizes a simplistic scene, almost like a child playing with a dollhouse. After everything has been arranged, Aryton then encases it between two layers of molten hot glass which is poured at 1100ºC (2012ºF). She uses what is called sandcasting. She molds the overall shape of the piece in sand — just as a plaster sculptor would do with clay or wax. One the first layer is poured, she has one brief moment, while the glass is still fluid, to manipulate the aspects of the piece. The second layer is then poured and the whole piece is placed to set in a kiln for two days where it will take its final form. The glass, as a fragile and volatile material, will solidify differently each time, creating a one of a kind piece.  The delicate and cloudy imperfection of each piece almost seems to mimic the memory of a child. The have a solemn charm that is nostalgic yet innocent. Each piece is quiet, quaint and unique. (via iGNANT)

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The Beautiful/Decay 50% Off Sale Ends Tonight At Midnight!

BD-SALE_lastdayYou may be back at work today but that doesn’t mean that you missed out on saving big at the Beautiful/Decay shop. Everything on the Beautiful/Decay shop is 50% off until tonight at Midnight (PST Time). Use discount code holiday50 to get all our books, magazines, artist posters, shirts and accessories at half the price. We have limited quantities of everything and will not be restocking any sold out products so act fast to take advantage of this rare holiday sale!

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Svetlana Jovanovic’s Surreal Fashion Portraits Emanate Otherworldly Sensuality And Unease

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Svetlana Jovanovic is a Netherlands-based photographer who imbues portraiture with a surreal edge. Drawing on her experience studying psychology at Belgrade University, Jovanovic knows how to access the models’ personalities, and by extension, the viewers’ psyches; women—often dressed in white and washed-out pastel hues—confront the camera with an otherworldly presence, embodying both deep alienation and sublime euphoria. Like images from a haze-filled dream, some of them look vaguely threatening, with horns, multiple tongues, and masks accentuating their otherwise calm postures. Model selection, set design, props, and digital image manipulation play an important role in the way the artist composes her scenes.

Also key to Jovanovic’s impressive style is a subtle exploration of gender, sexuality, and media representation—subjects that are important and highly politicized in her field of work. She does not portray femininity in conventional nor overtly sexualized ways; as her artist’s statement eloquently states, “Although slight stylization and eroticism might at first glance suggest analogies with fashion photography, Jovanovic stays well away from it. Instead, her work can be interpreted as the intention to develop a conceptual approach to photography by exploiting some conventions of fashion photography, examining its potential to visually shape an idea or subject matter” (Source).  Instead of complacency, the unease and ambiguity that surrounds Jovanovic’s photos encourages the viewer to recognize on their own objectifying practices and expectations of the female body in fashion and photography.

Visit Jovanovic’s website and Facebook page to see more of her fascinating work.

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Malaysian Artist Jun Ong Installs A Massive Glowing Star In A Five Story Building

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Malaysian artist Jun Ong has implanted a glowing star within an unfinished five story building in the town of Butterworth, Malaysia. The awkward confinement of the large luminescent sculpture within the otherwise gaping desolate space offers an air of confusion. Almost as if the star was there by mistake, perhaps stuck. The installation was indeed informed by a notion of error — the star seems to mimic a glitch. Metaphorically, this “glitch star” represents the state of Butterworth. The town, which was once an prosperous industrial port linking the mainland and island, now finds itself desolate and suffering from decentralization. The twelve sided star, spanning over the the full five floors of the building, is comprised of five hundred meters of steel cables and LED strips. The piece is created in fragments, as it is divided by the floors of the concrete structure. When entering the installation, the viewer is forced to experience each floor as its own unit, creating a multi-faceted adventure. Each floor is an experience of just a mere piece of the whole, perhaps alluding to the overarching disposition of the town itself. However, despite the installation’s “gltich” reminiscent quality and fractured formation, the star is wondrous and uplifting. The project, presented as a part of the Urban Xchange Festival, was curated by Eeyan Chauh and Gabija Grusaite of Hin Bus Depot Art Center. (via designboom)

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SEKDEK’s Fantastical Gore Ritual Acts As A Demon Extraction Kit

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Slightly gory yet somehow charming and fun, SEKDEK is part performative, part sculptural, part photographic, and part ritualistic. The artists behind the work refer to it as a “spirit extraction kit/ demon extraction kit.”

The project, in their own words,

“is a series of fantastically colorful, expressive & psychedelically gory sculptured head and torso images that were caught using an expressionistic painting/ messy visual chaos technique that includes throwing, spreading and or spitting clay, acrylic paint, glitter, fake blood, wigs, fabrics and flour etc.. all over ourselves.”

The inspiration for SEKDEK comes from a large spanning vat of various sources.  To name a few, the project takes visual cues from artist such as Mathew Barney, Björk, and H.R. Giger (the guy responsible for the creature from Alien [which he won an Oscar for] and apparently also the inspiration for “biomechanical” tattoos). They also name film influences such as the 1990 dark fantasy horror film Nightbreed, the 1988 satirical sci-fi movie They Live, and the opening scenes from Where The Wild Things Are. Also the heavy metal band Gwar (still not sure if this band is a joke or not) and images from National Geographic tribal indigenous documentaries.

Extensively absurdist yet clever and elaborate, SEKDEK is a unique project that invites imaginative thinking as it lives between the borders of fetish, gore, kitsch, and perhaps just plain ol’ innocent fun. 

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