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Multimedia EYE Project Invites Citizens To Sit In The Chair Of Surveillance

Pascal Leboucq and Lucas De Man

Pascal Leboucq and Lucas De Man

Pascal Leboucq and Lucas De Man

Working with one of the most socially relevant and controversial topics of recent years, artists Pascal Leboucq and Lucas De Man have installed a clever take about what it means to be surveilled, to survey and to be under surveillance. Their EYE project consists of 5 enormous eyes built into the sides of different buildings around the Dutch city of Den Bosch that viewers are able to inhabit and experience a dramatic view of the city from.

Once inside the different buildings of the project (including a theater, a modern hospital, an old building ready to under go construction, a monument and a corporate building), observers are ushered to a seat, fastened in and wheeled out into the hanging structure. They are then immersed into a multimedia sound and video experience altering the way  they are able to see themselves, their peers and their environment. Artist Lucas De Man says about the metaphor of eyes in this project:

A city with eyes is a city that looks and shows itself. No closed doors or shut windows, but open. We gave the city eyes so you can hang in the air above the world and look. Just look. (Source)

Lucas also talks about his desire for a more connected existence within cities, and how important it is to have these immersive experience to change our interaction with each other and within our shared environment.

Man wants to be heard and seen and has the need to share his vulnerability every now and then. The city must accommodate this need by being a place for, of and by people. (Source)

The Eyes are still open for viewing until November 1. They will then be on tour in 2015.
(Via HiFructose)

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Felipe Pantone’s Hi-Gloss Works Blur The Line Between Graffiti, Design And Hallucinogenic Patterns

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Complete with slick, bold colors and lens flares, artist Felipe Pantone livens up walls and urban environments with his murals. The neon-colored creations are text based and often coupled with geometric and monochromatic patterns. Their energy can’t and won’t be ignored, and it conjures up an aesthetic that’s contemporary, yet feels like it’s out of the late 1990’s thanks to a rainbow combination of gradients that fill the letterforms.

Pantone’s graffit straddles the line between traditional graffiti, typography, and design. It’s this mixture of popular cultures that gives a unique voice, and simultaneously looks familiar but is something all its own.  For someone who might only be familiar with one aspect of Pantone’s multifaceted inspiration, they can find something interesting and meaningful within it (aside it just being fun to look at). (Via The Fox is Black)

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Wei Li Makes Dangerous Popsicles In The Shape Of HIV And Other Viruses

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Wei Li

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San Francisco-based artist and designer Wei Li is making tasty treats with unpalatable connotations. Would you lick a cactus? Suck on a virus? Would just the idea of it change your experience of a dessert? In “Dangerous Popscicle” Li makes desserts in the shape of cacti, MRSA, influenza, chicken pox, escherichia coli and HIV from just water, sugar and coloring. To make the popsicles, Li created a series of one and two part silicone molds modeled in Rhino and printed on an Objet 3d printer. She writes on her website bold or italic:

“What will happen when we put these dangerous things on one of our most sensitive organs, our tongues? Does pain really bring pleasure? Is there beauty in user-unfriendly things?

Dangerous Popsicles create a unique sensory experience. Before tasting with your tongue, you first taste with your eyes and mind. The popsicles are nothing but water and sugar, but ideas of deadly viruses and the spikiness of cacti are enough to stimulate your senses, even before your first taste.”

There are inherent contradictions in this project—the colors of the items look delicious, but the subject is unappetizing, but the surface is pleasingly tactile, but the structure is painful.

Aside from making the molds and freezing the pops, Li is also interested in the social interaction this project fosters. How do people react to the frozen unsavories? Try it yourself—find directions on how to make this project at Instructables. (via The Creator’s Project)

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Aisha Zeijpveld’s Dreamy Pastel Portraits Celebrate The Absurd

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Based in Amsterdam, photographer Aisha Zeijpveld specializes in conceptual portraiture and works as a freelancer for myriad commercial magazines. Characterized by an interest in presenting her subjects’ “nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride,” her photographs evoke quirky surrealism and capture the absurd while boasting simplicity and maintaining clarity.

By placing her models before color-blocked backdrops of muted pastel and neutral tones, the subjects remain the focus of her dreamlike photographs. While each subject is situated in a pose typical of traditional portraiture, Zeijpveld transforms each piece with her eccentric editing; hair is replaced by twisting smoke or scattered dirt, individuals sprout extra limbs, and eyes become shrouded in listless clouds. While the exquisite level of detail and precision in her work suggests that these alterations and additions were carried out digitally, Zeijpveld’s illusions are crafted entirely by hand using scissors, found objects, and other tangible elements. Ultimately, through these techniques, Zeijpveld successfully “aims for the absurd, allowing her photographs to be positioned on the interface of reality and dream-world.”

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Marc Sinaj’s Hyperrealistic Sculptures Are So Good, People Complain About Them

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Marc Sinaj has such an eye for detail and dedication to quality, that his sculptures have observers constantly mistaking them for actual people. Strangers often try to interact with the figures, talk with them and even complain when they don’t receive any response. Born and based in Milwaukee, Sinaj often spends anywhere from 6 months to a year on a single sculpture (although usually working on multiple ones at the same time), and the hours he invests definitely show in the finished piece. He chooses to replicate figures with stories; people and characters with many wrinkles, pimples, blemishes, pores, stretchmarks, ingrown toenails and grey hairs.

…the vast majority [of the sculptures] are of all shapes and forms, some scrawny, other obese, some old, some young, some weak, some burly, the gamut of humanity. Sijan is like a superb writer in that regard who writes not only about the rich and famous, but instead about all facets of life on earth. (Source)

Working for over 40 years, Sinaj has perfected his skill of realistically reproducing the human form. Carrying on from the traditions of Roman and Grecian marble sculptors, Sinaj is a true modern master of bodies. Painstakingly building up layers of paint, and placing every individual hair, goose bump and freckle exactly where they should be, he shows of the extent of his talent. He never replicates someone without their permission, and always asks before taking their photo, as he is, in a way, cloning them.

Sinaj not only creates unbelievably realistic sculptures, he is effectively turning a mirror back onto ourselves – showing us in such a blinding light, we can’t ignore that humanity (with all of our flaws) is a strange and wonderful thing. He is celebrating the ugliness of reality. (Via Ignant)

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Tyler Spangler’s Spooky Neon Portrait Remixes

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Tyler Spangler’s digital collages rehash old portraits to uncanny effect. He mixes faces like batter or melts them like wax. Of course this would be much more gruesome were it not for the joyful neon colours he employs. His artwork has the distinct aesthetic of the internet age. Wild patterns and powerful colours are overload for the eye, providing a high level of stimulation pretty much required, now, to incite a strong reaction in the viewer.

In some cases, the overabundance of pattern and colour has the viewer process less, or otherwise require us to take much more time to do it. When there is so much to take in, the options are either to skim over it, or take much more time to engage with it. Spangler has a great range of intensity. Some of his works have 5 or less elements, where other have 20 or more different textures.

Spangler works digitally, and creates all of his graphics himself. Whereas in aesthetic the works can be called collage, he uses a minimum of recycled imagery. In this way, Spangler is more like a painter than a collage artist, creating his own imagined imagery. He is a digital painter easily able manipulate familiar imagery. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Enter To Win A Free Craftsy Portrait Painting Class With Micah Ganske

"Sleeping Dragon" by Micah Ganske, instructor of Narrative Portraiture

“Sleeping Dragon” by Micah Ganske, instructor of Narrative Portraiture

"Sleeping Dragon" detail, by Micah Ganske, instructor of Narrative Portraiture

“Sleeping Dragon” detail, by Micah Ganske, instructor of Narrative Portraiture

Narrative Portraiture/ Craftsy

Craftsy is an online art class company and community that offers hundreds of different arts and crafts eguides, online classes and other tools for sparking your inner creativity and honing new skills.  With progressive video components, a personalized accessible platform and incredibly affordable prices and free resources, Craftsy makes art education available to all.  Take advantage of Craftsy’s exclusive offer for Beautiful/Decay readers to enter in a giveaway to win Micah’s class valued at 34.99 by following this link! Narrative Portraiture: Painting in Acrylic is an engaging class in both technical and conceptual arenas, and we are proud to say it’s taught by a friend and colleague of Beautiful/Decay: Micah Ganske.

Micah Ganske received his MFA at Yale and has exhibited widely, including in Art Basel Miami.  His gorgeous, thought provoking painted works are featured here, along with images of class demos.  As an accomplished professional artist whose goal is “to make work which inspires and engages the viewer in what I truly believe is important and what drives me,” Ganske passes his insights and technical skill onto his students in an interactive online class that students can take at their own pace, anytime, anywhere.

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Iconic Album Covers Zoomed Out To Reveal What Happens Outside The Frame

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Aptitude, a digital agency based in Bedfordshire, U.K., pays cheeky homage to the (lost?) art of the album cover. They’ve picked an array of such album covers, some more tongue-in-cheek than others, and played around with the design by showing what’s been left out. On their site, you can scroll over each photo and “zoom out” to view the imagined bits from the cutting floor.

“Album cover art used to be meticulously created to portray some kind of message that the band or artist was trying to convey,” Aptitude says. In a way, that sums up their mission with this project as they set out to turn that message on its head. Their designs also function as a retrospective as they add a time traveler’s souvenirs into the mix: Justin Bieber’s My World pans out to reveal his untimely arrest; Bubbles glares balefully from a jail cell on the outskirts of Off the Wall.

Bruce Springsteen’s iconic Born in the U.S.A. zooms out to show the rock star approaching food truck serving — what else — burgers. In the foreground is a stereotypically hefty American. A bit on the nose? Maybe, but all in good fun.

“We all have a favourite album,” the agency says. “One that means something to us more than others.” (via Demilked)

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