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Mike Leavitt’s Combines World Leaders and Star Wars

star wars Empire PeaksEmpire PeaksEinstein  Empire Peaks Mike Leavitt - Empire Peaks

Mike Leavitt is  already known for his playfully subversive figures that feature and poke fun at other artists, celebrities, and world leaders. In his newest series, Empire Peaks, Leavitt combines famous leaders and innovators with characters from Star Wars. Comprised of 18 figures sculpted out of wood, and each corresponds to one character from the movie franchise.  Albert Einstein’s infamous expression is sculpted into R2-D2, while Steve Jobs is his counterpart C-3PO. Michael Jackson plays the part of the adorable Ewoks. US President Barack Obama is Lando Calrissian.

Inspiration for Empire Peaks came from Leavitt’s experience growing up as a Gen-X’r raised by Baby Boomers. With both his parents working, he had to entertain himself, relying on the cheap thrills of television and plastic toys. Describing the series, he writes:

For better or worse, each ‘Empire Peaks’ non-fictional character is complicit in the world order today. We’re all shackled to our past because of endlessly echoing paradigms. David Sirota argues in ‘Back to Our Future’ for a cyclical 30-year regurgitation of politics and culture. I think it’s an inescapable human nature causing regimes to repeat themselves. ‘Empire Peaks’ are meant to reduce modern dynasties to a sci-fi soap opera of objects.

It’s all about gluttony. Serving desires lubricates civilization. Capitalism fills desire and demand. Development expands. Culture thrives. From religious redemption to material objects, mass coveting is the driving force. (Via ARTNAU)

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Carlos Donjuan Combines Graffiti With Academia In His Figurative Paintings


Carlos Donjuan’s paintings combine his years of painting graffiti with the knowledge that he has gained in academia. By interweaving art history references with graffiti art’s history, Carlos creates a hybrid way of thinking made from art jargon and slang from the streets. His paintings work as narratives that are greatly influenced by everyone from Michelangelo to Alice Neel to Twist to Revok. There are elements in these works that deal with personal influences such as Catholicism, Mexico, Oak Cliff, illegal immigration, politics and family. The portraits not only tell stories, but also document several cultures and movements that these individuals are a part of.  Movements and cultures such as skateboarding, fixies, turntablelism, street wear, sneaker heads, graffiti and Hip Hop.

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Alex Schubert’s Blobby Boys

I like to think of Alex Schubert’s Blobby Boys as a mid 90’s live action sitcom that never happened.  They smoke (and deal) weed, romp around the city on motorcycles, slime people, and steal your milk money all before they’ve had band practice.

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How A T-shirt By OMOCAT Made Us Question Sex And Controversy In Art

Omocat Shota Shirt

Omocat Shota Shirt

Omocat comic 1

Omocat comic 2

What’s in a word?  That’s what the prolific and internationally known Asian-American artist Omocat has been faced with lately.  In the midst of her recent “shota” t-shirt release (pictured here), the artist’s intentions have in instances been taken widely out of context.  Embraced by Japanese fans that understand the context, some others have used it as a brutal platform for Western backlash.  In this instance something got lost in translation between hemispheres, and it is increasingly important that we explore the context and origin of the Japanese word shota and, above all, what this illustrates about western views on sexuality and gender.

Omocat’s continuum of work includes illustration, comic-books, clothing and merch with her designs.  Her imagery and content is often based on shota (which loosely translates to mean “pretty boy”) or loli (an expansive style and sometimes fetish originating in Nabakov’s Lolita). All of these artistic expressions stem from Otaku, an umbrella term for the Japanese manga-centric subculture that also informs the work of artist Takashi Murakami.   It is important to note that Omocat is quite vocal and literal within the work on her feelings towards social justice and self-empowerment in gender and sexual identity, with a strong personal stance against bullying.  This is illustrated fully in her comic “Pretty Boy,” featured here.   Omocat is even working on a collaborative artistic effort against bullying set to launch later this fall.

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Lee Misenheimer

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Lee Misenheimer’s work uses very basic media– a lead pencil or ball point pen and off white paper– but he creates awesome illustrations with intense detail. He derives inspiration from Japanese art as well as organic textures, mushrooms, air, and wind. He has openly admitted to have repetitive line syndrome and after a long break from art, he’s back!  

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Timothy Buwalda’s Smashed Cars As a Metaphor for Painting

 Smashed car crash paintings by Timothy Buwalda.

“My paintings deal with both the formal aspects of painting and the concept of the imagery.  I always want them to reference each other. How the painting is built and previous layers discarded is similar to how the cars are crashed and need to be fixed or left in their state. This can be broadened to speak to the choices we make at every moment, and the quiet consequences that are left.”

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The Date Farmers

The Date Farmers

Honest and inspiring work from California collaborative The Date Farmers. Artists Armando Lerma and Carlos Ramirez joined forces after meeting at an art gallery in 1998, and have been on a mission ever since. As American-born Chicanos, The Date Farmers poses unique perspectives on issues of race, wealth and cultural heritage, and much of their work examines the tenuous subject of social injustice, and the relationship between the have’s and the have nots around the world.

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Danielle Lawrence’s Abstract Paintings Erupt Out Of Their Frame, Commenting on Patriarchal Structures And Its Restraints

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel, Plastic, and Wood

It is always exciting and refreshing to see traditional art methods used in a whole new way. Artist Danielle Lawrence‘s fresh eye on contemporary art takes the conventional framed painting and transforms it into highly textural and sculptural work, taking it to another level. In her work, the frame is often still present, but the art inside it is spilling out, exploding from the frame that confines it. It is almost as if the paint has a life of its own, trying to escape from the cage and constraint we have given it. Lawrence explains that the frame is a symbol of patriarchal structures and restriction.

Lawrence’s non-representational painting method allows the colors to melt and drip, creating incredible movement in each piece. These colors appear bent, folded, and manipulated, creating organic forms. Each bright, glossy color erupting from each canvas and frame turns the typical two-dimensional painting into a more palpable, three-dimensional piece that reaches out at the viewer. Her artistic journey began while experimenting using trash as subject. Still pulling inspiration from found objects, the artist’s work often includes items from her studio, including plastic bags and bubble wrap. Lawrence’s take on form and material is both chaotic and structured, creating order out of an eclectic range of colors and media. She flawlessly creates a beautifully balanced mixture of classic painting methods with a new, contemporary approach.

She’s an avowed formalist with an eye to the street. Her works are lustrous and abject, smooth and sharp, blunt and sophisticated. While painting is clearly her passion, she makes promiscuous use of other media: sculpture, drawing, photography and video.

-Glen Helfand, ArtForum

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