Get Social:

Alma Haser’s Origami Portraits

Alma Haser photography5 Alma Haser photography2

Photographer Alma Haser has often incorporated origami into her work.  However, in her series Cosmic Surgery the origami is brought to the forefront.  For the Cosmic Surgery Haser photographs a series of portraits.  She next makes multiple prints of the portraits and folds them into complex origami objects.  The origami pieces are placed back into the portrait and a photograph is taken of the final composition.  Haser mixes the meditative nature of origami and transposes it onto the face of her subject, somehow injecting simple portraits with an esoteric atmosphere.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

C. Owen’s Stunning Portraits Of Taxidermied Animals

lavoiephotography9 lavoiephotography6 lavoiephotography11

C. Owen Lavoie’s (better know as C. Owen) series of photographs entitled Trophies captures the emergence of exotic creatures out of darkness. Because they are shrouded in so much darkness, these portraits at first seem to be taken in close proximity to live animals, but Lavoie is able to get so close to these beasts because they are taxidermied. This creates a haunting and mysterious effect that reflects on ideas about preservation, death, and hunting. The lens captures the preserved expressions of the creatures’ vulnerability, creating a sort of double preservation of the dead animal that stares right back at us. Lavoie says that she considers the series “a way of bringing the animals back to life for the public eye. It’s sort of like a third generation; first the animal was born, then hunted and handed over to a taxidermist so it can be displayed and finally in the end, modified by my lens.”

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Aurelien Arnaud

shutup

Grenoble, France’s Aurelien Arnaud‘s art work is not something you would walk by without looking twice. Arnaud’s designs are sharp, bright, and some, a little risque.  Interesting none the less. Not only a very skilled designer, Arnaud founded PNTS studio with Denis Carrier.

Currently Trending

Timothy HUnt Is Fickle Fate


British illustrator Fickle Fate’s (AKA Timothy Hunt) quirky and minimal style boils down ideas to the bare basic shapes,thoughts, and visuals to create fantastic graphics that will have you saying “Oh I get it!”  Now I just wonder what sort of clever wordplay and graphics can be found on his business cards?

 

 

Currently Trending

The Digitally Decaying Animals of Juan Travieso

Juan Travieso‘s work is a sort of contemporary nature painting.  His paintings of monkeys, bears, birds, seem to be falling apart into garbled digital information.  Travieso appears to be capturing the animals a moment before they degenerate into unintelligible pixels of color.  This could reflect an environment that is falling apart despite (or perhaps because of) constant technological progress.  Travieso captures a sense of urgency in the paintings, an irretrievable moment soon to pass.

Currently Trending

A Day In Decay: San Francisco (Part 3) Random Images From Around Town

IMG_3277

When I’m in SF I always wonder who the hell works in this town. It’s not the crust punks begging for change to feed their dogs, it’s not the new age hippies hugging trees in the parks, it’s not even the bike messengers who were hip to fix gears 10 years ago when Amaze and Twist were painting up a storm. Apparently it’s the worms.

Currently Trending

An Entire Amusement Park Packed Into A 13 Foot Cube

The Glue Society sculpture1

The Glue Society sculpture3

The Glue Society sculpture7

The Glue Society‘s newest project for Sculpture by the Sea, Aarhus is an amusent park, or rather, was an amusement park.  James Dive of the group gathered an entire demolished amusement park and compacted it into one 13 foot cube.  Pieces of rides and remnants of prizes can easily be seen in the mass.  The cube was clearly once a place people looked for fun and relaxation, but is now irretrievably gone.  Dive says of the project, “The project is about the finality of a missed moment.  Creating it was undoubtedly the most violent process I’ve ever embarked upon.”

Currently Trending

The Gigantic Balloon Sculptures Of Jason Hackenwerth Are Straight Out Of A Scientists Labratory

Jason Hackenwerth - balloon sculptures Jason Hackenwerth - balloon sculptures Jason Hackenwerth - balloon sculptures Jason Hackenwerth - balloon sculptures

It may be hard to believe, but these colorful creations of Jason Hackenwerth‘s are made from hundreds of balloons. He twists and sculpts latex balloons around each other to resemble different kinds of organic and biological forms. Hackenwerth creates all sorts of creepy shapes and forms that look like you are seeing something in a scientist’s laboratory magnified. Super colorful amoeba, cells, or rhizopods hang from the ceiling. Bacteria-shaped sculptures are grouped together, sprouting weird sorts of growths in every direction.

The artist is not only inspired by science – last year, Hackenwerth unveiled a large piece in Scotland at the Edinburgh International Science Festival. Titled Pisces, it is an interpretation of the Greek myth about Aphrodite and Eros. Made from over 10,000 balloons, it was a massive twisting spiral of two fish and took three staff members almost 6 days to blow up. Hackenwerth says more about it:

I see this as a metaphor for the evolution for life and the unexpected ways we can transcend our greatest threats. My plan for Pisces is to create a complex spiral that will open into a huge seashell like form. This spiral will correspond with the dynamic with the motion of the universe – the double helix. It is the spiral from which all life is derived. (Source)

Hackenwerth starts his process with drawings and sketches to help visualize how his pieces will work on a large scale. He then inflates balloons and arranges them in various structures to see what will work for the final piece. He talks about the importance of his medium:

Using balloons as a medium for expression came from a desire to connect with a wider audience. Balloons are accessible and they seem to have a magic ability for people to feel joy. Perhaps it is a regression to childhood. (Source)

Currently Trending