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Kayan Kwok’s Collages Of Vintage People Hanging Out In Your Organs

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Pastel-hued and delicate, the body part collages in the series “Anatomy” are part of Hong Kong artist Kayan Kwok’s daily art project “A poster per day for 365 days. ” The scope of her project is impressive—one fully realized piece of art every day for a year. Along with “Anatomy” the categories for the one-a-day posters are “Banana”, “Birdman”, “Blow”, “Dot”, “Hand”, “Letter”, “Loner”, and “Lost.Found”. Each grouping has a specific aesthetic and point of view although all are inspired by vintage graphics and American advertisements from 1920–1960.

In “Anatomy”, Kwok combines tinted anatomical drawings with mostly black and white figural images, incorporating other elements including scissors, flowers, and animals. She says:

“Collage has a surrealism background, but other than that, it also act[s] like Alchemy. Because you are putting stuff together from different places and times, the result is clearly unpredictable and this is what makes collage so fascinat[ing].”

One of the things that make this work captivating is the shifts in scale between body part and inhabitant. The small figures are nestled in, reclining on a heart chamber and a brain cavity. The integration of disparate parts into a cohesive whole makes these pieces deceptively simple. In fact, the blending of content and styles is technically accomplished, somewhat subversive, and really quite lovely.

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Faces Of Crying Babies Projected Onto Factory Smoke To Protest Pollution

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The pollution crisis in China is reaching an all time high. With over 500,000 people dying each year from diseases related to the air quality, it’s a time for action. A company in China called Xiao Zhu has decided to educate the public on just how serious the matter is. They have literally shone a light on the culprits – by projecting images of crying children’s faces onto the guilty factories’ billowing towers of smoke and pollution. As most of the victims of air pollution are children, this artistic protest has a hard hitting message. Stop now, or the future generations will continue to suffer.

The faces themselves are quite hard to stomach. Twisted and contorted faces fade in and out of the smoke clouds. Young boys are covering their mouths with masks trying to breathe without pain. It is an emotionally charged subject, and the company normally responsible for selling air filters have tapped into the drama of the situation. Their creative approach to such a huge environmental problem is working – people are noticing and spreading the word.

Xiao Zhu write this statement to accompany their video on Youtube:

We decided to put a spotlight on air pollution’s biggest culprits—the factories—by using the actual pollution from the factories as a medium…. Clean the air, let the future breathe again. (Source)

Not only is this a message for the whole nation, and world, but most specifically for the industry that is causing the damage. And I’m sure they won’t be able to avoid looking up at their own factories and see the mess they are creating. (Via The Creator’s Project)

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B/D’s Best of 2010- Cut Paper, Part 1

Peter Callesen, "Fall", 2008

Peter Callesen, "Fall", 2008

You might have already read our series on food artists. B/D has decided to feature another 3-part series on cut paper artists! The art of paper-cutting evolved from the traditional Chinese craft, stretching back to the 6th century. Today, contemporary paper artists have pushed this art-form into focus once again. Armed with their X-Acto knives, (and nail scissors?), these artists have redefined the meaning of intricate. (Some actually believing they’ve only completed a day’s work once their hands shake with fatigue, waking up sore the next morning!) Though it can be frail, finicky, and prone to tearing, their choice of medium is deliberate; they’ve claimed paper as a way of using an ordinary material to express themselves in unconventional ways. Check out the three cut paper artists of the day!

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Ben Sandler’s Humorous Freeze Frames

Paris based photographer Ben Sandler’s photography series feel like small freeze frame shots of instantaneous events. I love the architectural detail of each shot, its environment holding just as much weight as it’s action, and the humor behind the predicaments of each character.

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Kate Bieschke

Kate Bieschke’s narrative photographic series, Performance for the Camera, revolves around the theme of having grown up as the “wild child.” She addresses nostalgic internal issues of needing drama, connection, rejection, and solitude. Through her own relatable explorations, she invites the viewer to anonymously reflect on their self as well.

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Linda Kim

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Los Angeles based illustrator and designer Linda Kim’s work is the stuff of dreams –  wind-swept scapes just slightly off-beat of reality. Her inspiration comes from direct observation of the actual world, using as many of her senses as possible to create her interprations. I’m particularly excited to see that Linda binds her artwork into beautiful, well-crafted books that act as mini-portfolios!

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Dreamy And Disturbing Photographs Use Artful Decapitation To Portray Human Emotion

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Have you ever wondered what you would look like without your head? Artist pepedsgn has been asking himself the same question: his most recent series #Losingmymind consists of a collection of colorful photographs depicting people, whose heads have been edited out. The result is both frightening and beautiful all at once and t forces you to reflect on the importance we give to the head and, the face, and the eyes in our everyday lives.

Pepedsgn plays with the double meaning of “losing your head” both in the literal and figurative senses in this decapitation series. The idea that the pressures of living in a modern world full of overstimulation, paired with the flood of human emotion we live with on a daily basis, paint a background for the loss of self depicted in these photographs. The depiction of headless subjects gives both a playful irony and, a certain thoughtfulness to the series by physically showing subjects without their heads.

The uncanny beauty of seeing people without their eyes, faces, or mouths makes the series all the more fascinating in the sense that their heads ,which govern all emotions and most non verbal communication are gone. Pepedsgn leaves it up to the public to imagine the possible emotions of the subjects and takes the notion of “brainspace” to a beautifully explicit level which allows us to reevaluate the way we read emotions.

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Janol Apin Creates Literal Translations Of Parisian Subway Stops

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Janol Apin’s “Métropolisson” is a creative project that illustrates the literal translations of the names of various Parisian Metro station stops. The collection of photographs features more than 100 images of Apin’s friends posing in the underground subway stops; from an astronaut in the Champ de Mars station, to a couple dancing tango under the Argentine stop, he leaves nothing out.

With clever puns and creative costumes, Apin makes it possible for this work to be understood by anyone…there’s obviously no need to speak French to capture the essence of this work. Almost every snapshot from this series is comprehensible through the upbeat and universal imagery that the photographer creates. (via Bored Panda)

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