Get Social:

Florian Beaudenon Invites Us To Relish Voyeurism In His Photos From Above

3031932-slide-s-instant-033031932-slide-s-instant-09 3 3031932-slide-screen-shot-2014-06-13-at-50142-pm

French photographer Florian Beaudenon’s series Instant Life invites the viewer to relish their voyeurism as we spy on people caught from above. The intimate photographs features a variety of women living their everyday lives; they fix a bike, eat on the couch, and write in a notebook. Although we’re invited into their homes, we never see their face.

If you love people watching and interiors, then Beaudenon’s photographs probably pique your interest. The compositions are zoomed in enough so we can admire the fine details of their dwellings. Collections of books, sex toys, and shoes are all featured in the wood-floored homes. It doesn’t matter that we can’t fully see what these people look like – we learn enough about them through just the items they own and how they organize where they live. (Via Fast Co. Design)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Made With Color Presents: Anja Priska Is Monkeying Around With Humanities Fate

MWCdarling

Anja Priska

MWCSuperhero

MWCremote-control

It’s Tuesday which means it’s time once again for our exclusive partnership with premiere website building platform Made With Color to bring you the best contemporary art and design from around the world. Our friends at Made With Color help creative people from all walks of life build sleek and user friendly websites in minutes, allowing artists to use their spare time doing what’s important, making art! This week we’re excited to bring the work of London based artist and Made With Color user Anja Priska.

Since 2009 monkeys, one of the most common and ambiguously-loaded animals in the history of art, occupy an increasingly important role in the work painter and sculptor Anja Priska. Mixing elements of hard edged abstraction, pop culture, and humor, Priska creates wonderfully bizarre worlds where our DNA sharing cousins run amuck, kick back, and most of all make us humans take a closer look at ourselves.

Constantly developing the primates in her work into metaphors of the intuitive process of being, Priska gives them the suggestion of a voice on humanity’s fate as well as their own. By performing caricatured roles of humans the monkeys hold up a mirror to their audience, making us aware of how much we mimic ourselves and others in order to be.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Stephen Wilkes’ Cleverly Captures The Transition From Day To Night In One Photograph

Presidential Inauguration, Washington, D.C.

Presidential Inauguration, Washington, D.C.

Wrigley Field, Chicago

Wrigley Field, Chicago

Santa Monica Pier, California

Santa Monica Pier, California

Western Wall, Jerusalem

Western Wall, Jerusalem

Stephen Wilkes‘ “Day to Night” series captures the day-to-night transitions that occur in familiar cityscapes. Each image represents a collection of moments, not just a singular moment in time. About 50 photographs out of around 1,500 shots taken over the course of 12-15 hours comprise each single resulting photograph. During his shoots, Wilkes doesn’t allow himself bathroom breaks and when he eats, he eats meals brought to him in a bucket because it’s imperative that the photographer pay careful attention to the emptiness or potential overlaps of each shot. Wilkes’ composite photographs document movements within the same space from sunrise to sunset, each image capturing the transitions these spaces undergo on a daily basis.

For Time, Wilkes offers a descriptive caption of many images. Of his Wrigley Field photograph he explains, “This photograph was taken during the course of a Day/Night double header, a rare occurrence these days in major league baseball. Wrigley Field is the Grand Temple of baseball parks. It will change dramatically within the next year, as large jumbotrons will be installed into the stadium, forever changing this view. While the morning was sunny and clear, the afternoon made for a real challenge photographically. We had rain showers on and off throughout the day, and into the evening.”

Read More >

Currently Trending

While Visiting Uganda, Photographer Stumbles Upon A Bizarre Set Of Faceless Portraits

Martina-Bacigalupo-Photography-1 Martina-Bacigalupo-Photography-2 Martina-Bacigalupo-Photography-3 Martina-Bacigalupo-Photography-4

While visiting the town of Gulu in Northern Uganda, Italian photographer Martina Bacigalupo discovered a very unusual set of studio portraits. Despite being perfectly composed, none of them featured a subject’s face as they were all cut out leaving blank rectangles in the photograph. Oddly enough, it appeared to be a common practice in Gulu for taking ID photos.

Bacigalupo visited Uganda searching for ways to document this community, which was suffering from violent conflicts. The first faceless photograph she had stumbled upon lead her to meet Obal Denis, the owner of the oldest photography studio in town, the Gulu Real Art Studio (est. 1973).

“The portraits were well composed, with subjects seated on a chair or on a bench, with a blue, white or red curtain behind them, in various poses and modes of dress. Obal <…> told me the secret behind those pictures: he only had a machine that would make four ID photos at a time, and since most of his clients didn’t need four pictures, he therefore preferred to take an ordinary photograph and cut an ID photo out of it.”

For Bacigalupo, these ‘leftover’ images were the purest form of representation of Gulu’s society. She gathered the unused prints and interviewed clients of Obal’s studio. To most Ugandans, who suffered from more than two decades of war, taking new ID photos marked important changes in their lives: getting a driver’s license, starting a new job or applying for a loan. The value of such events is perfectly conveyed through the subject’s pose, gesture, clothing and other subtle details.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Jim Lambie’s Stunning Geometric Floor Installations Create With Tape

Jim Lambie Jim Lambie Jim LambieJim Lambie

With regular vinyl tape, Glasgow-based artist Jim Lambie transforms any given space into a colorful, mesmerizing landscape that often create optical illusions. There is no beginning and no end, no contraction and no expansion- in turn, Lanbie says that his construction “somehow evaporates the hard edge off and pulls you towards more of a dreamscape.” Much like the iconic, giant works of the Abstract Expressionists, its composition is hypnotic, abysmal, and sometimes spiritual, but always bit disorienting at first.

The labor intensive intallations take up to several weeks to complete, but that is no excuse to stop making them. As a former musician, the artist draws on musical references as inspiration. Often time, the titles of his pieces refer to iconic bands or songs, including The Doors, Morrison Hotel (2005), and Careless Whisper (2009). The design of his installations  depend on the architecture of the space; each and every one of these are unique and transient installations that cannot be exactly reproduced anywhere else.

(via My Modern Met and Web Exhibits)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Mind-Blowing Body Painting Glows Under Black Light

johnpoppleton1
johnpoppleton9
johnpoppleton11
johnpoppleton2
Fueled by his reverence for the natural world, the Northern Utah-based artist and photographer John Poppleton paints fluorescent landscapes onto the backs of nude bodies with temporary pigments. Photographing his models under backlight, he constructs starry nighttime constellations that conform to the curves of the female silhouette. As a commercial photographer with a passion for fantasy, Poppleton incorporates his masterful painting in this “Black Light Bodyscapes” series. Each piece takes a few hours to complete, and many of them are personalized or custom-made for his subject; one painting includes a teepee to honor its model’s Native American heritage, and the mountainscapes that are visible from Poppleton’s own window make numerous appearances.

Poppleton’s mesmerizing work is both current and timeless. While echoing the electrifying aesthetic of techno raves and the like, it also maintains ancient themes. Like mythologies surrounding the figure of the Mother Earth, the “Black Light Bodyscapes” tie the female to the natural world. In a manner reminiscent of the story of the ancient Greek goddess Gaia, the planet seems to spring forth from a fertile well of female power. Here, as with folklore surrounding the deities of Greece, Europe, Asia, and Africa, the silhouetted woman becomes equated with the moon and the lunar calendar; in darkness, she lights the way, delighting the eye with an irresistible shine. Dotted with radiant celestial bodies, backlight painting may be seen as a sort of divination, reminding us of the splendor of nature that we too often forget in this modern age. Take a look. (via My Modern Met)
Read More >

Currently Trending

Yuto Yamasaki’s Hand-Carved Wooden Plants Might Trick You Into Watering Them

yuto-yamasaki-1yuto-yamasaki-2yuto-yamasaki-4yuto-yamasaki-5

Don’t have a green thumb? That’s alright. Japanese artist Yuto Yamasaki hand-carved these wooden flora that look like real potted house plants. To construct this impressive collection, he chiseled away at large logs and formed them into succulents, palms, and bonsais. A coat of paint was applied to the wood afterwards and further extends the illusion. From far away, they might trick you into watering them.

The artist uses wood because it’s easily available to him, and he places a great importance on the physicality of art making as a way of exploring subjectivity. “The issue is not what I make; there is no meaning to be found in my pieces beyond a confirmation of the existence of the artist and his experience of making the work.

Yamasaki’s attitude is reminiscent of when people describe why they enjoy knitting. The repetitive motion is a calming activity, where your mind can safely wander and while you’re doing something that’s active. “Making art objects with my own hands, void of conscious thought, is a therapeutic and meditative experience,” he says. “The challenge is to put myself in a state where the materials make my hands move automatically.”  (Via Spoon + Tamago)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Gregory Kloehn Makes Awesome Sculptural Mobile Homes For The Homeless

gregory-kloehn-dumpster-homes-17[2] gregory-kloehn-dumpster-homes9[2] gregory-kloehn-dumpster-homes10[2]  gregory-kloehn-dumpster-homes2[6]

California-based artist Gregory Kloehn was tired of making sculptures for rich people. “It just sits there,” he said. “I kind of think that if you’re putting so much effort into something it would be nice if it actually did something.”

With the help of a close knit art community, Kloehn began his Homeless Homes Project, a collaborative endevour that provides sturdy, innovative and mobile shelters for the homeless.

They look like sculptures, but they actually serve a purpose.

Kloehn starts the process by installing beds, sinks, stoves, and storage shelves on regular old dumpsters and shipping containers. All of the ‘amenities’ are made with repurposed materials found on the streets.

To prove that his dumpster homes are fit to live, the artist put it to the test. He has actually lived in one that he built for himself, and fitted with such conveniences as granite counter topped kitchen, a microwave, a mini-stove, a fridge, and even a cushioned sofa.

With a successful run, Kloehn is a now a full-time home builder. So far he has built 10 tiny homes, some of which have already found tenants. (via Amusing Planet)

Read More >

Currently Trending