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James Mollison’s Poignant Photographs Of Children’s Bedrooms Around The World

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English-born photographer James Mollison was asked to come up with an engaging project that was powerful enough to bring awareness to Children’s rights. Given this thought, Mollison was compelled to capture the more private side of children all over the world- he photographed their most personal and private possession, the place in which they sleep.

“It occurred to me that a way to address some of the complex situations and social issues affecting children would be to look at the bedrooms of children in all kinds of different circumstances”

Where Children Sleep, a book in which he published these photos along with an extended caption that tells the story of each child, shows a variety of space and a variety of children – some are living in abject poverty, lacking basic food and sanitation, while others are more fortunate by being born in a country where those things are guaranteed and usually taken for granted.

“From the start, I didn’t want it just to be about ‘needy children’ in the developing world, but rather something more inclusive, about children from all types of situations.”

You can purchase the book here. (via Pulptastic)

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The Monochromatic Street Art Of Christian Kraemer AkA Dome

Christian Kraemer

Christian Kraemer

Christian Kraemer

Christian Kraemer AKA Dome is a Karlsruhe, Germany based street artist with a knack for monochromatic murals. Not confining himself to the streets of Germany, the artist paints his massive black and white murals everywhere from Turkey to Poland. Focusing on surreal themes, Kraemer’s work taps into mysterious narratives that take place in familiar yet strange worlds full of elongated figures wearing animal heads upon their heads while playing music as they travel in unknown seas.

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We Love Our Work

Lernert & Sander

A bold claim made by Dutch artists Sander Plug and Lernert Engelberts, but fairly well deserved. Since their first collaboration, they have been working on commercials, leaders, art movies, documentaries and installations. Their aim is to make simple and communicative works, that takes little note of the existing border between contemporary art and commercial projects. Their highly esthetic, humorous and dedicated works are often challenging the media and its viewer, in a simple but very effective way. Check out some of their shorts after the jump! They all sort of share the same color palette and are nice in that way.

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Nancy Liang’s Subtly Magical Hand-Drawn GIFs

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang - Illustration

Nancy Liang‘s GIFs and illustrations are peaceful and full of quiet wonder. Much like the imaginings of Chris Van Allsburg in his book “The Mysteries of Harris Burdick,” Liang’s work captures moments from larger stories. They depict scenes of midnight contemplation as well as magic of a subtler flavor: an upside down house surrounded by snow floating up toward the moon; a boat drifting down an empty street; a small child accompanied by a ghostly spirit animal. These are only ghosts and flights of fancy that evoke the shape and landscape of a wider fantasy world that intersects with ours in the shadows.

According to her artist’s statement, Liang “often explores social and cultural narratives in an ironic, metaphoric and emotive way.” These narratives are especially clear in her illustrations that shine a light on suburban life and escapism. The paper textures and lines of graphite bring a storybook quality to her artwork that makes them seem childlike and gives them a kind of universal accessiblity. (via I Need a Guide)

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sylvana d’angelo

Some interesting digital collages in the portfolio of Vancouver artist sylvana d’angelo . Take a peak at some of my favorites after the jump.

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Patty Carroll’s Ghostly Women Draped In Fabric

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll - Photography

Patty Carroll photographs women who hide behind fabric. In her series, Anonymous Women: Draped, she features figures sitting and standing, all shrouded in luscious fabrics, rugs, and more. These women are invisible, meant to convey the idea that as we perfect the space of our home, it can fuse with our identity. Carroll’s choice in fabrics harkens another era, and look like they could be in the house of a grandparent. The Nuclear family of the 1950’s and 1960’s comes to mind in her work, when women’s roles were often domestically confined. Carroll writes about the series and the inspiration and implications behind it, stating:

I am addressing the double edge of domesticity; the home as a place of comfort, or conversely, a place where decoration camouflages one’s individuality to the point of claustrophobia. The draperies in these photographs act as both a visual cue as well as a literal interpretation of over-identification/obsession! While my direct sources for this series come from furnishing a home, as well as remembering the nuns in their habits while growing up, this series also references draped statues from the Renaissance, women wearing the burka, the Virgin Mary, ancient Greek and Roman dress, priests’ and judges’ robes, among others. I believe everyone has a hidden identity formed by personal traditions, memories, and ideas that are cloaked from the outer world. Cultivating these inner psychological, emotional and intellectual worlds is perhaps our greatest challenge as people, wherever we come from or wherever we live. (Via I need a guide)

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Studio Visit: Adam Helms

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Adam Helms is known for drawing radicals and constructing ominous wooden watch towers.  His current project is a series of 48 charcoal portraits in response to Gerhard Richter’s “48 Portraits.”  Richter’s work used encyclopedia photos to catalog the iconic males of Western culture.  Helms is also cataloging icons, but shifts focus to the dangerous fringes where civil wars and insurrections take place.  Ranging over the entire political spectrum, from anti-establishment and anti-government groups to official government troops, Helms’ portraits are intentionally politically ambiguous, stating “The politics are less interesting to me then this idea of a repeated identity.”

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Manuel de révolte au travail

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The brilliant aspect about instructional illustrations is that they speak for themselves (don’t miss the story in its ordered entirety by clicking on Read More below). But if you’re further wondering what this little beauty was intended for, it comes to us thanks to Packard Jennings and the Centennial Society who describes this as a “small, sixteen-page pamphlet… produced to put inside the postage-paid, business-reply envelopes that come with junk mail offers. Every envelope collected is stuffed with the pamphlet and mailed back to its original company.” Feel like participating in some subtle revolts of your own? I would recommend checking out their participate link!

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