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Scott Weaver Uses 35 Years And Thousands Of Toothpicks to Create A Sculpture Of San Francisco

Scott Weaver - Toothpicks and GlueScott Weaver - Toothpicks and Glue

What do you get when you combine thousands of toothpicks, glue, and ingenious craftsmanship? You get the work of artist Scott Weaver, who has created a model of San Francisco out of these materials after thirty-five years of creative determination. Nothing more than these two simple materials, toothpicks and glue, forms the intricate layers of this concrete jungle. Scott Weaver began this structure, titled Rolling Through the Bay, in 1974, but has been building sculptures out of toothpicks since he was eight years old. His early work began as abstracts formation, much smaller than his San Francisco masterpiece.

As if constructing such a complex, detailed, city replica out of miniature objects was not impressive enough, Weaver’s piece Rolling Through the Bay is interactive! The structure is kinetic, as it navigates ping pongs balls like tourists through the many infamous sites and neighborhoods that make up San Francisco’s lifeblood. You can see city attractions like the Golden Gate Bridge and Chinatown in his mass of toothpicks, but much more is to be seen. The delicate intricacy of this astonishing sculpture speaks volumes to Scott Weaver’s skill and patience. It is not surprising to know that the artist is a San Francisco native, as is many generations of his family before him. The love and pride of San Francisco can be seen in the time and care that Rolling Through the Bay took to create.
(via Colossal)  All Photography by The Tinkering Studio

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Santa Invades Classic Works Of Art In Ed Wheeler’s Photographs

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The Birth of Venus, Inspired by: Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus – 1486

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The Dream, Inspired by: Henri Rousseau, The Dream – 1910

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Golconda, Inspired by: René Magritte, Golconda – 1953

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Death of General Wolfe, Inspired by: Benjamin West, Death of General Wolfe – 1770

Ed Wheeler, a photographer, superimposes himself on famous paintings while dressed in a Santa costume.These hysterical renditions are inspired by Ed’s long time traditions of dressing as Santa for holiday cards he created for fun. For years, Wheeler would send out photographs of himself as Santa doing strange and comical things to clients around the holiday.

Inspiration stuck with him, and, according to Wheeler’s website, in 2011 Wheeler stood in front of Emanuel Leutze’s famous painting of George Washington at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, it was then that it occurred to him: Santa needed to invade canonical works of art!

That is just what he did.

As you can see in these photos, Santa (Wheeler) has made appearances in many famous paintings. He appeared in his long underwear as Venus de Milo in Botticelli’s most iconic painting, and has also posed as a pensive, and a very spirited Santa, over Claude Monet’s Water Lillies. Through Wheeler, Santa has ridden Napoleon’s horse, sipped a cup of coffee in a 1940s diner, played poker with dogs, and floated in a flock of businessmen into the stratosphere in these humorous interpretations of some of art’s most iconic works.

These have become a hit; the Philadelphia Museum of Art is now selling Wheeler’s Santa Classics in their official gift shop for $12.95 a set. You can get them here. (Via Fast CoDesign)

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Steven Jon Yazzie’s Coyote Series

Steven Yazzie is a Native American (Navajo Nation) artist who lives in Arizona. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps before pursuing painting through residency at the prestigious Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and is currently pursuing his BFA in painting from the University of Arizona. Although this review focuses exclusively on Yazzi’s Coyote Series, he has an extensive body of work that ranges between abstraction and surrealism, incorporating an interest in pattern, shape, the Southwestern landscape, and Navajo culture and history.

Yazzi’s paintings question the relationship between man and nature, and between interior and exterior spaces. Elements of the wilderness and the playful trickster Coyote are placed alongside modern, minimalist domestic spaces; several paintings even reference the ultimate minimalist establishments – the gallery space – drawing from principles (if not necessarily the practice) of Institutional Critique.

Looking closer, all of his interiors are symbolically suggestive of their original elements – an animal printed ottoman, stone colored couch, grassy rug, unprocessed lumber table, and landscape paintings adorning the walls all mimic the desert landscape to which they are adjacent; the coyote must still feel somewhat at home within these fused environments.

Among his many achievements, Yazzi has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; National Museum of the American Indian, New York, NY; the Museum of Contemporary Native Art, Santa Fe, NM. Phoenix Art Museum, Tucson Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson Museum of Art, and the Museum of Northern Arizona and has been featured in the 2011 West issue of New American Paintings.

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Nick Cave

Chicago artist Nick Cave’s outlandish “soundsuits” have enough awesome going on standing still, but these intricate assemblages are also performance costumes. Grab a copy of Beautiful/Decay Book 4 for a sprawling feature on Cave with tons more (giant, gorgeous) images and an interview in which he discusses his recent exhibition at the Fowler museum, his process creating the suits, and his desire for art to be a joyous community-wide experience.

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Pro Infirmis Raises Body Diversity Awareness With “Disabled” Mannequins

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Pro Infirmis, a Swiss charity organization for people with disabilities, has created a series of mannequins that reflect bodies of people with physical disabilities for a project titled, “Because Who is Perfect? Get Closer.” The process of measuring the bodies of 5 people and sculpting the mannequins was captured by director Alain Gspone in this moving 4 minute film. The reactions of each person upon seeing their mannequin are also captured, with one woman remarking, “It’s special to see yourself like this, when you usually can’t look at yourself in the mirror.” For people not used to seeing reflections of their body types in the commercial world, these new mannequins create an empowering experience by providing a platform of visibility in an industry that so often neglects to represent the diversity of bodies.

After the mannequins were created, they were placed in Zurich store fronts, on a popular downtown shopping street, Bahnhofstrasse, in honor of International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The video shows a range reactions of people as they walk by the store front, captivated by these new mannequins.

Through this project, Pro Infirmis wishes to raise awareness of the lack of representation of people with disabilities, especially in the world of fashion and retail. You can find more photos and information about the project on Photopress.  (via the huffington post and the daily mail)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Amon Tobin

 

Creative music video by Jan Schoenwiesner for an Amon Tobin remix. People in costumes, shapeshifting buildings, and a nice mix of chaos can all be found within.

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A Common Name’s Urban Geodes

A Common Name is a Los Angeles based graphic designer and artist whose decidedly different take on street art is anything but common. In contrast to traditional 2-D street art materials like wheat paste and spray paint, she takes to the streets with bright geometric forms reminiscent of geodes, comprised completely of paper. Seeming to grow out of cracks and crevices in the eroded urban landscape, these pieces are suprisingly subtle and fragile treasures likely to be overlooked by those caught up in the constant hustle of city life. Treasure hunters and urban explorers can track down these tiny gems and peek into the painstaking process with which they’re made by checking out A Common Blog.

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Meredith Dittmar Sculpts The Scale Of The Universe In Clay

Meredith Dittmar - Polymer ClayMeredith Dittmar - Polymer ClayMeredith Dittmar - Polymer ClayMeredith Dittmar - Polymer Clay

Portland based Meredith Dittmar draws on the world around her as inspiration for her delicately formed compositions. Made entirely from polymer clay, she twists, squeezes, slices and weaves different shades together to form her distinctive artworks. Reminiscent of fantasy computer games, scientific drawings and algorithms, and including organic forms of vines, leaves and trees, Dittmar’s work is a beautiful combination of science and art; man and nature; patterns and rhythms.

She cites her influences as:

“the mushrooms found in our forest, Eames power of 10, and the visualizations of complex math, science, and especially theoretical physics.”

The idea of a “Cosmic Zoom” that Dittmar displays in her work is very evident. She simultaneously depicts the Universe at a large scale, including cities, forests and planets; while also focusing in on it at a minute scale – including quarks, atoms and molecule structures.
She often includes some sort of figures in her work to add a human scale.
These can be anything from human hands holding a form, or body parts being split open by triangles. Known also for designing different characters in polymer, Dittmar sculpts these into her landscapes. Alien-like creatures with big eyes bring a strange sense of humanity to her work. They make you feel like you are viewing your own world, and something quite different. Dittmar and her creations definitely bring a new sense of wonder to the simple things around us. She points out, that maybe things aren’t that simple, after all.

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