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Yuki Onodera’s Silhouette

I’m loving these silhouette photographs by Yuki Onodera. Check out her show in NYC at Yossi Milo Gallery opening April 7th.

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New Work by Jan Kalwejt

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Jan Kalwejt, who contributed the amazing “Lung Music” shirt has a bunch of new works up on his site. Check ’em out!

 

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Christian Engelmann

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This is a picture of a picture projected onto the scene that the picture was taken of. Duh. Needless to say, artist Christian Engelmann likes to mess with people. His art is often interactive and always maintains a sense of playfulness aimed at eliciting exaggerated double-takes. Engelmann tries to jolt people out of their every day state of being and remind us that the universe is full of surprises.

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Bobby Neel Adams Halfsies and Wholes

Most of Bobby Neel Adams‘s whole shpiel is taking two seperate images and composing them as if they were one.  Old and young, man and woman, comparing and contrasting two different relationships and how they work together.

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Myung Kuen Koh’s Beautifully Intimate Architectural Photo-Sculptures Of Shifting Perception

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Korean artist Myung Kuen Koh creates intimate structural sculptures of shifting perceptions. Myung Kuen Koh’s work acts as tiny dreamlands that perfectly suggest a certain non-specific person, place, and/or time. Each piece takes the form of an urban structure — one that seems effortlessly familiar. Perhaps each one is an ode to the past; an old home, the house of an ex lover, a place that was once cherished. Their open movement and intentional distortion possibly hint at the fragility and elusiveness of memory. His images tend to portray two seemingly unrelated subjects: classical sculpture and urban, and often run down, buildings. However, these two images, despite their differences, achieve an equal sense of meditative air. Both types of images allude to a type of quiet, yet demanding physical construction that refer to a means to measure history. His work, it seems, could be either inherently personal, or, on the contrary, be focused on a collective notion of time. The artist’s work is almost cinematic, each piece being reminiscent to projector images along a edifice’s surface. Myung Kuen Koh’s delicate work is created through the process of layering translucent images. He then laminates his images and with goes the task of melting them together, resulting in a shimmering and striking sculptural montage. (via hi fructose)

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Christopher Murphy’s Paintings Of Memories

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Artist Christopher Murphy paints memories, using old family photographs as source material. He paints the Hoover Dam, large family gatherings, his younger self, and more. Murphy’s work is technically very good, and the realistic renderings of his paintings to look like photographs. They also depict quiet moments. While a lot of them involve people, there is very little tension among subjects. Colors are desaturated, which ages the look of them. Murphy spoke to New American Paintings about his work. He describes the overarching theme of his paintings, as well as his decision to use old photographs for reference. He says:

Imagination playfully cavorts with authenticity to fabricate the essence of memory. It is at this intersection, between the poles of fiction and truth, that my current paintings and drawings are situated.  Issues of contrast, specifically of finding harmony between dissonant elements, have been a constant theme in my work.  I see my paintings as opportunities to explore the conceptual contrasts of reality versus illusory and permanence versus ephemeral as applied to memory.

I choose old family photographs (largely culled from my own family’s albums, but supplemented with a selection of found photos from estate sales and thrift stores) to serve as the basis for my work, because of their unique qualities of semi-permanence, staged semblance, and ostensible candidness.  In these photos, skies fade to pale yellows, skin tones sink, and details blur and grow fainter with time.  Sometimes, dated technology necessitated blank stares or static poses, caused colors to skew, or impacted the framing of an image. By either exaggerating or minimizing these characteristics, along with re-contextualizing figures and objects or dramatically re-staging the action of a photo, the divisions are obscured between the reality that existed at the moment of the photograph, the memories of that moment, and the possibilities of reality that are presented in my work.

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John Chae’s Fantastic Digital Worlds

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John Chae’s digital illustrations are suffused with bright colors, provocative images, and pop culture references. These digital worlds are odd and labyrinthine and reflect a pastiche of influences. While strangely captivating, his use of patterns and repetition is quite hypnotic. His work feels like a hybrid of Charles Burns’ and early mimetic internet styles. From his website:

안녕하세요! My name is John (희택) Chae and I was born in the year of the dragon (1988), but I’m technically a rabbit. My birthday jam is Tiffany’s Could’ve Been and my blood type is B, but I’m not sure whether I am B+ or B-… I was born in Boulder, Colorado but I grew up in Seoul, Korea. I graduated with a BFA in painting from the Maryland Institute College of Art. I currently reside in Jacksonville, FL.

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Ben Dehaan Alters The Printing And Drying Of Photographs By Removing Light

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Ben DeHaan‘s “Uncured” series captures the decay of a printed photograph as a result of the removal of the UV light used to instantly dry the ink on the page and cure the image. These portraits appear as if they are melting and evoke a surreal aesthetic, creating a completely unique visual experience that questions the idea of simple replication. In this series, Dehaan also seeks to address the role of machinery and the physical environment in the response to forces that construct the image. (via)

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