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Peter Anton’s Realistic Sculptures Will Fool You Into Eating Them

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For those with a sweet tooth, the work of Peter Anton might make you hungry. The artist’s hyperrealistic sculptures of cakes, candies, and ice cream bring the sugary treats to life. At first glance, they pass as real food rather than as convincingly-painted and crafted artworks. “I like to alter and overstate foods to give them new meanings,” Anton writes in an artist statement.

The colorful, larger-than-life works showcase an acute understanding of texture and lighting. Anton was very aware at how luster plays into the believability of his objects. As a result, some of the “frosted” donuts shine just as you’d imagine. In non-glazed objects though, he applies a matte finish.

Anton has an innate reverence for what we eat, and it’s what leads to these works creation. He says:

Food brings people together and there is no better way to celebrate life. Through the use of humor, scale, irony, and intensity in my forms, the foods we take for granted become aesthetically pleasing and seductive in atypical ways. I like to create art that can lure, charm, tease, disarm and surprise. My sculptures put viewers in a vulnerable state so that I can communicate with their inner selves in a more honest and direct way. I activate the hunger people have for the things that give them pleasure and force them to surrender. The sensual nature of the works stimulates basic human needs and desires that generate cravings and passion.

 

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Le Bestiaire Exhibition Encourages The Child In All Of Us To Play Dress Up

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The current Le Bestiaire exhibition on display at the Biennale internationale design de Saint Etienne 2015 in France is an adorable collection of grizzly monsters, creatures, critters, beasts and fiends. 14 different creatures of all shapes, sizes, colors and textures were dreamed up by a diverse bunch of artists including Studio Brichet Ziegler, Perrine Vigneron and Gilles Belley, Louise de Saint Angel, Anne Lutz, Joachim Jirou-Najou, Felipe Ribon, Les Graphiquants, Twice, Helkarava, Bonnefrite, Malika Favre, Amélie Fontaine, Leslie David and Ionna Vautrin.

In a workshop inspired by the animals in the exhibition, kids are asked to imagine themselves as a make-believe beast. A project created by Amélie Doistau and Tomöe Sugiura, the different monsters have forms, colors and patterns from actual, real life animals.

The exhibition asks us to think what it means to wear a costume, to don a disguise and to have the opportunity to act out of character.

When we dress up, regardless of whether we become beautiful or ugly, good or bad, marvelous or monstrous, everyone gets into character and is excused of all odd behavior, without being subject to ridicule. The animal kingdom is amazing and rouses the imaginations of young and old alike. Many designers have explored the world of childhood through this unifying theme. They transform everyday objects referencing zoological world. Could it be the desire to tame wild animals that propels designers to represent fierce creatures as docile pets? (Source)

If you get the chance, be sure to check it out for yourself, and you can ponder these questions further. Le Bestiaire runs from March 12 until April 12, 2015.
(Via Pattern Pulp)

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Philippa Beveridge Reconstructs Memories In Glass Change Purses

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British artist Philippa Beveridge fosters mystery through her series of glass change purses. In an on-going project titled Lost and Found, she reconstructs the dainty-looking accessories with trace amounts of what was left inside. The thick glass resembles an ice sculpture that also gives her work a fleeting, ethereal feel. She describes the sculptures in her writing:

[These] on-going series of works deal with the concept of collective and individual identity through the everyday form of a purse: a belonging which is often lost, stolen or mislaid, full of sentimental value and charged with personal memories. I began to make this work during a three-month long artist’s residency in Northern France. I invited local residents to visit me at the studio and show me the contents of their purses.  Building on the theme of traces, I highlighted the objects and details found in the purses to forge histories and construct identities. The resulting imagery, trapped in the material, expresses notions of time, memories and sentiments which lean towards metaphorical interpretations in relation to one’s own past. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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The Painted Carvings Of Tae-Jin Seong Convey Love, Honor And Happiness

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The technicolor world of Tae-Jin Seong rests meticulously on a carved piece of wood. Beneath his brilliant colors are hidden texts, symbols and scratches adding a secret aura to the painted surface. Combining that with a scroll-like comic book effect adds unique ability rarely seen in this day and age. Seong’s work points to the old traditions of woodblock printmaking.  Except here, the prints are missing and a picture is permanently rendered onto the surface. There is contextual balance in his narrative combining newspaper funnies, scroll painting and comics which he uses as fertile playing ground to tell everyday stories about love, honor and happiness. His cast melds into old Ssaurabi figures (similar to Samurai) with everyday people and western superheroes. He creates a dual reality which borders on what is and what one perceives it to be.
From certain perspectives,  Seong’s paintings explore quilt traditions with their sense of bright color and patchwork due to the under carvings. The tradition of quilt making includes the element of native story telling which Seong does to positive effect honing in on the daily life of small villages in his native Korea. In the end his work becomes a foray of hope turning vibrant eye candy into humorously thought provoking commodity. (via thecreator’sproject)

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Adorable Hand Painted Porcelain Animal Bowls Crafted By Hella Jongerius

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These beautiful hand crafted ceramic bowls are the handiwork of artist Hella Jongerius. A designer who specializes in fusing traditional practices with contemporary ones; industrial techniques with craft skills, Jongerius is no stranger to trying out new things. Commissioned by German porcelain company Nymphenburg, the animal bowls are a homage to the different animals found in the companies archives. Since the 18th century, Porzellan Manufaktur Nymphenburg (based in Bavaria) have produced high quality, fine, artisanal ceramics. Over the last 266 years, that has included countless tea sets, vases, decorative and utilitarian plates, and now limited edition bowls. Jongerius now joins the long list of artists and craftsmen who have collaborated with Nymphenburg.

From the treasure of historic shapes containing around 700 animal figures at the manufactory, Jongerius selected eight designs and placed them in simple bowls. She then supplemented the naturalistic painting of the snail, bird, rhinoceros, deer, hare, frog, fox and dog with a different pattern from Nymphenburg’s painting archives – from designs originally intended for a soup tureen right up to a drawing of the plumage of a guinea fowl. (Source)

Her playful style and eye for color and design, all work beautifully with the cleanliness of the bowls. Jongerius has her own design company which has produced many products for clients in New York, Basel, Sweden, and the Netherlands. Her work has also been shown in galleries around the world, including the Copper Hewitt National Design Museum, MoMA, and the Galerie KREO in Paris. (Via This Is Colossal)

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Read Between The Lines: Carl Krull’s Infinite Lines Reveal Hidden Faces

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull - Graphite on Paper

Carl Krull uses repetitive lines to form hidden faces revealed between the lines. Each drawing contains endless line after line that flows across the composition in waves, drips, and swirls.  The organic rhythm created is quickly interrupted by different shifts in its pulse, not unlike a line in a heart rate monitor. It is incredible how the orientation of the lines create such different effects, resembling the texture in tapestries or the grooves and patterns in a topography map… but only if the hills and mountains depicted were in the shape of faces! In fact, Krull’s large-scale drawings have been referred to as “human seismographs.”

Amazingly, the Danish artist came up with this technique by drawing lines during a road trip across the United States with his wife, acting as a “seismograph” would. Each bump, twist, and turn of the drive was incorporated into drawings, which are included in his series Scroll Drawings.

Krull’s work, created entirely from graphite lines, takes the human body form to a whole new level by letting the negative space between his lines to let the eye create the shape. Each bend in the line creates a rift in space in which you cannot tell whether the form is concave or convex. His drawings are as mysterious as they are intriguing, as they defy laws of space and gravity. The faces and appendages emerging from a sea of graphite mesmerize you while you search for more figures amongst the methodical chaos. The massive size of Krull’s drawings further pull you into the hypnotic repetitiveness of each composition, with figures that materialize right before your eyes.

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Mark Harless’ Haunting Photographs Explore Death, Magic, And Transformation

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Mark Harless (also known as “Bleeblu”) is a conceptual photographer who creates worlds of magic and astounding beauty. Death, mystery, and ritual seem to be recurring motifs in his work; from bodies in bags deserted in the forest, to flowers sprouting from a young woman’s shadowy skin, to hands placed ceremoniously on a bare, narrow chest, each image is an emotional event. Like the calm before and after a storm, there is a sense that something powerful has happened, or is about to happen.

What intrigues me most about his work is the brave and neutral portrayal of death, loss, and transformation. In his Fertilizer series, for example — the images depicting the bagged, naked bodies — Harless explores the erratic cycle of life and death, and how we, and our material forms, are an inevitable part of it. As Harless explained in an interview with Phlearn:

“[D]eath isn’t just the end. It’s not the beginning either. It’s just part of the life cycle. Show me the beginning and end of a circle. After we die our bodies will decompose and the plants and animals will feed off of us in the same fashion a bag of fertilizer would.” (Source)

While the above statement refers specifically to Fertilizer, this theme of death, decomposition, and renewal reverberates throughout Harless’ other works. In La Faune et la Flore, for example — a collaboration between Harless and the French illustrator Moon — a woman (Molly Strohl) wanders naked around the dark shoreline of a secluded lake. Like a wayward revenant, there is something sad, powerful, and lonely about her, but the illustrated flowers sprouting from her face, arms, and torso offer a glimmer of life and rebirth. The image of the dead bird also connects with this theme, for while lying on its flowery funeral bed, the small creature seems on the verge of resurrection as it returns to the earth. In short, Harless’ photographs have an uncanny ability to confront us with the beauty, sadness, and magic that permeates our earthly lives.

Visit Harless’ website, Tumblr, and Instagram and explore his haunting and magical visions.

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Samantha Wall’s Cathartic Look At Multiracial Identity Through Portraiture

 
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Indivisible is a series of graphite and charcoal portraits of multiracial women done by artist Samantha Wall. According to Wall, it is a study to understand her own dual ethnicity and capture subtle human expressions which transcend gender or race. By working with these women she was able to delve deeper into not only her own multiracial skin but also into others and in the process study the facial movement of each subject. To Wall, this was particularly important because as a multiracial person she related to the theories of Paul Eckmann who claimed that no matter what the background; financially, sexually, racially etc. certain human emotions could be universally understood through facial expression. However, at the time of her research, Wall was interested in emotions that could not be conveyed through facial gestures such as shame. Wall says as a child growing up in Korea and then the U.S. she felt a lot of shame which was a result from her mother’s set of Korean values.
The drawings in Indivisible are a cathartic look at women like Wall who may or may not have experienced the same feelings. It captures different emotions through subtle use of line and gesture bringing the essence of each person to the forefront. Part of Wall’s process was taking dozens of digital photographs of the women she met with, then studying those pictures to make her delicate yet powerful drawings. The end result is a sensitive look at these diversely beautiful women.  (via illusionscene360)

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