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Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s Geometric Trompe L’oeil Installations

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ - Trompe L’oeil

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ -  Trompe L’oeil Installation

Henriëtte van’t Hoog’ - Installation

Dutch artist Henriëtte van ’t Hoog’s installations look 3D, but are completely flat. She uses trompe l’oeil to give her work depth, designing space in a way so that our eye is fooled. To do so, she uses geometry and specifically placed and angled shapes, sometimes building out of the wall to create more complex structures. In an interview with Visual Discrepancies, van ’t Hoog describes why she makes her work. Not surprisingly, her explanation is light-hearted. She states:

…I have been poking around for a while hoping to make people aware of color and shape, and of non-existing space. In Joint I [above] transformed a little area into something new and unexpected, joking around with color and shape while not knowing where it would lead – just having fun, and working through ways that would perhaps mislead the audience.

van ’t Hoog’s color palette is light and very colorful, at times sickeningly so. She regularly uses day glo yellow and hot pinks, which vibrate against one another in industrial spaces and white walls of a gallery. Her installations are based on believability, meaning they must be precise; She paints crisp lines and plans the angles of extra walls and surfaces so that her work appears 3D at all viewpoints. Even though there is a lot of planning involved, van ’t Hoog wants to make it look effortless. It’s important to her that the viewer see something unexpected. Later with Visual Discrepancies, she says:

…I hope when people step inside this small space and see the play with the flat and the three-dimensional, the play with the perspective and the triangular objects and how a painted piece of paper is disturbing their expectation, together with the strength of the color, that their experience will hit the roof.

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The Wilderness Downtown

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Chris Milk has partnered up with Google to create this amazing interactive Arcade Fire “The Wilderness Downtown” music video. You put in the address of a home you grew up in, and through Google Maps, your childhood neighborhood is featured!

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Kevin Christy’s Allegorical Paintings

Kevin Christy lives and works in Los Angeles. He utilizes unyielding iconography to present allegories about the world we inhabit. Christy seems to have a firm grasp on popular culture and historical events and uses it to mock and enlighten. From a strikingly humorous depiction of Adolf Hitler slipping on a banana peel to an extended tee shirt adorned with the American Flag Christy channels the present and the past in his satirical depictions.

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Matthieu Gafsou’s Lost In The Alpes

Matthieu Gafsou’s photographs take us on an epic journey through the Alpes.

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50% Off Sale! Only 2 Days Left!

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Only two days left on our big 50% off Blow out sale. All shirts, magazines, posters, books, and accessories are 50% or more off. Everything is selling out quick so get on it today!

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B/D Apparel Sale- One Day Left!

You only have two days let to get all Beautiful/Decay T-shirts and Beanies for 60% off! This sale includes items already on sale so your combined savings can be up to 80% off! Just use the password “FALLBDSALE” at check out between today and September 28th (midnight PST) and save big!

 

 

 

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Photos Of Plexiglas Pierced By Bullets Resemble Exploding Galaxies

Deborah Bay Deborah Bay

Deborah Bay

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing an article about photographer Deborah Bay.

I began thinking about The Big Bang after seeing a sales display of bullet-proof plexiglas with projectiles embedded in it. The plexiglas captured the fragmentation of the bullets and provided a visual record of the energy released on impact. In deciding to explore this concept further, I also was intrigued by the psychological tension created between the jewel-like beauty and the inherent destructiveness of the fragmented projectiles. Many of the images resemble exploding galaxies, and visions of intergalactic bling sublimate the horror of bullets meeting muscle and bone.—Deborah Bay

 

Houston-based photographer Deborah Bay gives us that interesting mix of creating a beautiful visual to comment on a darker issue. The Big Bang addresses the steadfast affection America has for its firearms. The topic is especially relevant for the native Texan, who lives in a state that has an estimated 51 million firearms. The images were made in Bay’s studio after law enforcement professionals from the Public Safety Institute of Houston Community College shot at sheets of plexiglass.

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Anti-Photographs by Sonia D’Argenzio

French/Italian artist Sonia D’Argenzio sent over some of her new abstract ‘anti-photographs’ this past week, and i’m more than impressed. Her ability to pull an excellent image from film before/after/without processing is unrivaled (at least to my Tumblr eyes), and i’m even more convinced by her devotion to the analog process. She might just be the real deal.

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