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Takayuki Hori X-Rays Origami Animals To Highlight Pollution In Japan

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Origami is both impressive in its folded construction as well as its ability to signify the need for change by urging us to look beyond the paper forms. Animals are no doubt the most popular subject, and Japanese artist Takayuki Hori has a twist on the conventional foldings. He crafts these animals to appear as victims of Japan’s urban pollution, and the pieces expose the sad truths of what happens to these creatures. Hori showcases garbage in their insides using X-ray-like detail. If you look closely, you can see tiny bottles and other trash within the stomachs and ribcages.

These works appear in Hori’s exhibition Oritsunagumono (which means “things folded and connected”) which critiques the polluted coastal waterways and the effects they have on its inhabitants. Images are printed onto translucent sheets of paper and later folded into their origami shapes. The result are a ghostly tribute and haunting reminder of our impact on the environment. (Via Fast Co. Design)

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Scott Espeseth

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Scott Espeseth’s works draw from cartoons, children’s books, and the doodles we used to sketch into the margins of notebooks when we were supposed to be taking notes. (Who says memorizing the state capitals is more important that creative expression, anyways?)  Espeseth says he draws in order to get lost in a different space and time, often to reminisce. He favors a wide range of media that are “commonplace, overlooked, and sometimes obsolete,” from silverpoint to the humble ballpoint pen.

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Keisuke Tanaka Hand Carved Mountain Sculptures

Although references to animation and manga can be found in the large sculptures of Japanese artist Keisuke Tanaka, the artist’s main themes revolve around life and death, as he considers one of his main motifs, mountains,  to be a magical place where life begins and ultimately ends. Each hand carved sculpture is built out of solid wood with so many miniature details so that we may get a sense of the view that the gods might have of the imaginative world of Tanaka.

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Will Ritson

Will RitsonWill Ritson sent us an email of some of his work. This guy knows how to push a pencil. His illustrations are pretty sweet, so enjoy!

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LA Hall

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New York City based designer/artist  LA Hall is dedicated to spending quality time with his sketchbook, recording both the world around him and the world within him. For those of you in need of inspiration I suggest spending some time with his sketches or browsing his featured work on Cargo Collective.

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Best of 2011: Jo Hamilton’s Crochet Heads

It’s not everyday that we post an artist who works with yarn but Jo Hamilton’s crochet portraits are really interesting. I’m really happy that Jo decided to not over finish these and left them without a background and with the yarn hanging down. Sort of looks like paint drips and adds another dimension to the work that you don’t see often in crochet.

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Jeremy Willis’s Acid Paint Distortions

Jeremy Willis did a studio visit with B/D in 2010, and he’s been developing his work since that time.  His new body of work employs ultra-saturated color schemes alongside imagery that is being distorted and displaced.  Faces form and dissolve, bodies jump and skitter over water like flat rocks being skipped by kids on the edge of a lake.  The imagery revolves around figures of statuesque women, they are presented to the viewer in a way that evokes and defeats desire in the sense that they are there and not there.  You can see his work show, Jackie and Judy, up now at Allegra LaViola Gallery in Manhattan.  The title of the show comes from a catchy Ramones song, “Jackie is a punk.  Judy is a runt.  They went down to the Mud Club, and they both got drunk.”

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alice anderson Monumental Installations Made Of Doll Hair

Alice Anderson’s giant installations created out thousands of feet of red colored doll hair are a thing of wonder. Selected for its relationship to her own bright red hair, Anderson selected the material to refer to her childhood where she invented rituals based around her hair to calm her anxieties when left home alone. Draped over buildings, walls, and every imaginable surface, Anderson’s work is just as much about reinterpreting an everyday material as it is about coming to terms with the ghosts of her youth. (via)

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