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Surreal Buddhist Bug Project Tries To Negotiate Between Buddhism And Islam

Buddhist Bug ProjectBuddhist Bug Project Buddhist Bug Project Buddhist Bug Project

Cambodian-based artist Anida Yoeu Ali conceptualized The Buddhist Bug Project, which sprouted from her fascination of other religions. She was raised in the Muslim faith but is drawn towards the Buddhist religion. Her project attempts to reconcile these two interests. Ali explains:

The Buddhist Bug Project seeks to map a new spiritual and social landscape through its surreal existence amongst ordinary people and everyday environments. The Buddhist Bug (BBug) is a fantastic saffron-colored creature that can span the length of a 30-metre bridge or coil into a small orange ball. Rooted in an autobiographical exploration of identity, the Bug comes from the artist’s own spiritual turmoil between Islam and Buddhism. Set amongst everyday people in ordinary moments, the Bug provokes obvious questions of belonging and displacement.

The Bug’s colorful exterior references robes worn by the Buddhist Monks, while the style of its head piece is modeled after the Islamic Hijab. The travelling project has made its way to Cambodia, where Ali and photographer Masahiro Sugano stage site-specific performances. We see the Bug wrapped around tables, in a boat, up a flight of stairs, and more. Its presence allows for others to interact with it and take part in the project, which is part of Ali’s intent. “…meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphoric device for stories to spread across an expanse.” She says. “For me, performance and storytelling become ways of bridging the interior and exterior space of self as well as initiate critical dialogues between communities and institutions. (Via design boom and The Philanthropic Museum)

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The Wildly Warped Sculptures of Jonty Hurwitz

Much of the work of Jonty Hurwitz plays with perspective.  This is perhaps most obvious in the art pictured here.  Hurwitz creates severely warped sculptures that are snapped back to shape in the reflection of a cylindrical mirror.  He does this by scanning objects, digitally manipulating them, and fabricating the digital models.  This explanation, though, is extremely simplistic.  On his process, Hurwitz says:

“I usually start by expressing a concept using mathematical tools, often involving billions of calculations and many months of preparation. I then explore ways to manifest these formulae in the physical world.” [via]

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Bad Things That Could Happen

Amazingly clever short from London collective This Is It. It’s easy to forget that the only props being used are cardboard, people, and a lot of ingenuity.

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Jessica Joslin’s Dark And Delicate Sculptures Made From Bone And Metal





For her series “Animal Alchemy,” the sculptor Jessica Joslin uses delicate found animal bones and antique metal works to build an array of animal acrobats, who play at balancing on balls and interacting with one another. As suggested by the work’s alliterated title, her pieces present a touching marriage of the biological and chemical. The incorporation of once-living materials succeeds seamlessly for Joslin’s choice to use nostalgic and decorative out-of-date metals; against the rusted filigree of fragmented keepsakes, the time-bleached animal bones appear right at home.

Joslin’s creatures navigate a fine line between fragility and aggression; in a piece titled Troy, the reimagines the deceptively merciful figure of the Trojan Horse, fortifying a spindly neck with bullet casings. Frail skulls wear protective armor as if preparing for some ancient battle. Against the sheen of durable metals, animal bones appear unexpectedly delicate despite their sharp teeth and clawing talons.

With breathtaking precision, the artist allows her bony creatures a single mark of vitality, filling their cavernous sockets with marbly eyes. The careful emotionality of the pieces ultimately makes them more gentle than frightful; the sculptor subtly realizes their personalities and relations with one another through the downcast slant or expectant focus of a pupil. A particularly poignant two-headed tortoise is only given two inner eyes, causing each head to fixate the other without access to a peripheral world. Similarly, a horselike beast gazes upwards balefully, pulling the heavy carriage behind him.

Each piece, beautifully fashioned with discarded bones and obsolete metalworks, performs for the viewer, imploring us not to forget their purpose. Take a look. “Animal Alchemy” is now on display in Scottsdale, AZ at Lisa Sette Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Ricky Allman



Bold Surreal landscapes with a dash of colorful abstraction by Ricky Allman.

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Michael Hall

Michael Hall presents a series of paintings studying the various abandoned coastal defense structures scattered throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. These defense structures were used as outlook posts for possible attacks that never came. It is interesting to see these bunkers still standing on guard as the ground beneath them attacks, and erodes their surface. This show was on view at the Patricia Sweetow Gallery in San Francisco.

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Louis Cameron

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Very cool show from artist Louis Cameron at I-20 in New York. In my humble opinion, there are few subjects that have as much cultural significance as the American Flag, so it doesn’t surprise me that artists continue to try their hand at reinterpreting the ‘Stars and Stripes’. The paintings in this show depict flags that were created in the 1960’s as a response to the Pan-African Flag (designed by Marcus Garvey), and were meant to symbolically represent the African-American experience. So there, you get some art and a little history lesson on a wonderful sunday afternoon!

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Thorsten Schmidtkord’s Upside Down Head

Ever wonder what your face would look like if your head was upside down? If so just check out these bizarre photos from Thorsten Schmidtkord.

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