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Awesome Video Of The Day: Good Man By Raphael Saadiq

Raphael Saadiq”s video for Good man is a great example of how to tell a story through music. So much music these days is just a bunch of nonsense with nothing behind it but Saadiq has hit a home run.I don’t even really like R&B and I love it!

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RANDALL ROSENTHAL’s Solid Wood

Nope this isn’t all the subscription money i’ve been stuffing in my mattress for the last ten years. Rather it’s a trompe l’oeil sculpture by Randall Rosenthal. Each sculpture is hand carved from a single block of wood and then painstakingly painted for months. See more of Randall’s amazingly realistic wood sculptures after the jump.

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Sink Or Swim- Alex Seton’s Life-Like Inflatable Rafts Made Out Of Marble

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

Alex Seton - Sculpture

You may have seen Alex Seton‘s previous work: lightweight pieces of clothing, heaped casually in a corner, draped on a pair of hangers — and carved from marble. Seton’s sculptures are incredibly hyper-realistic, creating an illusion of malleability and texture that insists on a closer look. In his latest exhibit, “Someone Died Trying to Have a Life Like Mine,” Seton again uses cold, hard marble to replicate objects that would float rather than sink: inflatable rafts, palm trees, and life jackets.

This contrast is part of what Seton is exploring with his art; the depth and contradiction of the objects he portrays and their actual substance. In an interview with the gallery Sullivan+Strumpf, Seton says, “There’s no easy read on these objects. They are both an optimistic and shining series of objects, but they’re also sardonic, they also have a darker side.” The installation addresses the complex topic of those who seek asylum, largely by risking death by sea or other means, only to be turned away.

“Each of these is both inflated and deflated; each of these is welcoming and unwelcoming. How do you justify shattering a life?” Seton asks. “Or a desire or a dream? How do you do that? And what are the long-term impacts of that?”
The objects around him, which appear in a kind of memorialized limbo, have no answer for him. They are frozen by stone and time.

“Someone Died Trying to Have a Life Like Mine” can be seen September 16th to October 11th, 2014 at Sullivan+Strumpf in Sydney, Australia. (via Design Boom)

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Jim Wright’s Wacky Castles

Verticordious and Scopperloit, 2007, acrylic on foam, wood, and

Verticordious and Scopperloit, 2007, acrylic on foam, wood, and aluminum, 64

 

 

Jim Wright’s out there painting and sculpture present an alternate American universe of hypercolor shag, talking animals and rainbows. More fantastical lands after the jump!

 

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Fay Ku

Gorgeous narrative drawings and watercolors by Brooklyn based artist Fay Ku.

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Bone Furniture

Bone Armchair side_site

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Dutch design agency/think tank Joris’ Laarman’s exquisite Bone Furniture.

“Ever since industrialization took over mainstream design we have wanted to make objects inspired by nature: from art nouveau and jugendstil to streamline and the organic design of the sixties. But our digital age makes it possible to not just use nature as a stylistic reference, but to actually use the underlaying principles to generate shapes like an evolutionary process…

Trees have the ability to add material where strength it is needed, and bones have the ability to take away material where it is not needed. With this knowledge the International Development Centre Adam Opel GmbH, a part of General Motors Engineering Europe created a dynamic digital tool to copy these ways of constructing used for optimizing car parts. In a way it quite precisely copies the way evolution constructs. We didn’t use it to create the next worlds most perfect chair, but as a high tech sculpting tool to create elegant shapes with a sort of legitimacy. After a first try-out and calculation of a paper Bone Chair, the aluminium Bonechair was the first made in a series of 7. The process can be applied to any scale until architectural sizes in any material strength. The Bone furniture project started in 2004 with a the research of Claus Mattheck and Lothar Hartzheim, published on Dutch science site Noorderlicht.” (via)

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Joshua Hoffine Stages Frighteningly-Real Photos Of Lurking Monsters

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Photographer Joshua Hoffine is interested in the psychology of fear. His series of horror-centric images called After Dark, My Sweet, focus on what lurks behind us, underneath the bed, and below the stairs. Hoffine’s frightening, realistic-looks photos offer not only a compelling narrative, but are awe-inspiring in their craftsmanship and attention to detail. They look believable, making them even more scary. “I stage my photo shoots like small movies, with sets, costumes, elaborate props, fog machines, and special effects make-up,” Hoffine explains. “Everything is acted out live in front of the camera. I use friends and family members, including my own daughters, as actors and crew.

The photographer also writes about his fascination with horror:

We are all born with certain inherent and instinctual fears, such as fear of the dark, the fear of lurking danger, and the fear of being eaten. As we grow older these fears lose their intensity and are slowly shuffled away into our Unconscious.

Horror, as an art form, draws its strength from the Unconscious.

I believe that the Horror story is ultimately concerned with the imminence and randomness of death, and the implication that there is no certainty to existence. The experience of Horror resides in this confrontation with uncertainty. Horror tells us that our belief in security is delusional, and that the monsters are all around us.

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Jake And Dinos Chapman

 

Jake and Dinos Chapman have been some of my favorite artists to emerge from the YBA’s. With each show they seem to step up the level of gore, shock, and grotesque imagery mixed in with historical and cultural themes. For the past year, Jake and Dinos have been working in separate studios to produce a series of works in isolation from each other. Only in the staging of their current show at Whitecube will each become aware of what the other has done. Unlike Gilbert & George, for whom Jake and Dinos worked at times as studio assistants, their practice is not one of ‘singular duality’. They have always discussed, debated, argued and on occasion fought over creative and cultural ideas, but in this exhibition they will scrutinise and confront the whole idea of creative collaboration. Hear the brothers discuss the process for creating this show, get a walk through of the show, and hear them talk smack about fellow YBA artist Tracy Emin after the jump.

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