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Ryan Biegen Hands Out 60 Disposable Cameras To 25 Artists, Capturing The Raw Essence Of Summer

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With images of fireworks, stick and pokes, young lust, and a guy who decided to shake the hand of 27 strangers, Ryan Biegen’s project, Disposable Summer, exposes an honest, memoir-like, catalog of youth. His project started with the documentation of his own travels using throw away cameras, eventually leading him to an idea for a larger project that would culminate in an exposé of the lives of 25, young, Brooklyn based artists. He states:

“I like the simplicity and the well, disposable aspect of the cameras.  They’re breakable, recycled things, often with inaccurate viewfinders, skewed lenses, light leaks etc.  Most of the time what you think will be a good shot ends up awful, and what you think will be awful, ends up as magic. Disposable cameras have a funny way of doing that; their quirky nature lends to unexpected, often unintended, results.”

Despite the diaristic nature of the work, the images seem to blur the line between art and documentation. The camera’s imperfections create a unspecific sensibility of timelessness; they act as delicate, washed out montages of ephemeral adolescence. The physical vulnerability of the film allows the combination of light and chance to guide each image into having it’s own version of reality.

A large part of the projects charm, is that the images, even within the fantastical realm of the distortion, are indeed replications of the genuine. Without the falsified nature of social media platforms, crops, filters, or hashtags, they expose the artist’s summer the way they truly happened. They have a simplicity that results in a euphoric sense of freedom — unaffected by the world outside of the specific moment. They have a true type of raw energy. The type that only ever exists in the summer.

For more of Ryan Biegen’s work, check him out on Instagram or join him tonight at the opening.

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Levalet’s Wheat Paste Street Art Interacting with the City

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Street artist Levalet more than only uses the public space as a canvas.  The artist’s wheat paste images interacts with the city itself.  His life size subjects lean, sit, and lie down on the surfaces they are pasted on.  He even incorporates everyday objects such as books and umbrellas to further bring his work to life.  You can find his work on walls, on the street and in galleries, scattered throughout Paris, France.  [via]

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Luis Dourado’s Famous And Dreaming

luis douradoLuis Dourado’s Famous and Dreaming series literally made me say “Wow” out loud. My fave from the group is of JFK pictured above. I also included two other images that I liked at the end of the post that are from other projects.

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Huge Paper Kite Installation By Jacob Hashimoto

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The installations of Jacob Hashimoto are at once huge and delicate.  Here, Hashimoto fills the gallery with hanging paper kites. Though the space is saturated with the kites, they seem to be nearly floating as a giant flock, weightless for a moment.  As is found often in his work, the kites appear to reference the natural world.  Some kites sway like an ocean with images of water printed on them.  Others are purely white and float in scattered bodies like clouds.  At times, the large flowing installation even resembles a school of fish. [via]

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RYAN TRECARTIN X DAVID KARP

As a part of Rhizome’s Seven on Seven, Ryan Trecartin and David Karp created riverofthe.net, a collection of 10 seconds or less community submitted videos. Trecartin, probably today’s most important video artist, and David Karp, creator of tumblr, were brought together, along with several other artists and technologists, by Rhizome back in 2010. Anyone can easily submit, and the more videos the better, because one of the only negative aspects is seeing videos you’ve already viewed before. It’s an incredibly simple and effective idea, which showcases videos that are typically more interesting than most video art out there.

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A Friend of Mine

A Friend of Mine

A Friend of Mine seems to be the alias of one Suzy Tuxen, a designer working in Melbourne, Australia. She specializes in carefully crafted typographic branding work, often for small boutique shops.

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Conceptually Driven Photography Evokes A Touch Of Play With A Dash of Sartre

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Coke Wisdom O’Neil’s conceptually driven portrait series The Box feels theatrically avant-garde, akin to Sartre’s No Exit, with strong emphasis on “the look”– or, the dilemma of seeing ourselves as objects in other people’s consciousness.

Each photograph was originally shot in a twenty-two foot tall wooden box, constructed by the artist himself and set up in a variety of different public spaces from New York City to Texas. Such an unnaturally large empty platform allowed curious subjects the freedom to perform when shooting; however, ironically, it also has a tendency to trap when printed– evoking a doll-like sense of display, especially when collected back-to-back on a gallery wall, suggesting “the look” is relative to not only our minds, but also most apparent in photography or art itself.

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Matthew Simmonds Sculpts Miniature Sacred Interiors Out Of Solid Pieces Of Stone That Absorb The Imagination

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Inner architectural worlds open up in the works of Matthew Simmonds. Beginning his career as a student of art history at the University of East Anglia, the artist gradually moved into sculptural and architectural work, studying stone carving at Weymouth College and later participating in the restoration of several notable monuments, including Westminster Abbey and the cathedrals of Salisbury and Ely. Following these experiences, he began working on his stone sculptures, applying his combined knowledge of history, architecture, and stonework to carve miniature sculptures depicting hallowed interiors.

Simmonds’ works are masterpieces of perception. Despite their small scale, his sculptures absorb the viewer’s imagination with illusions of infinite space; under sunlit arches, through dark corridors, and up monolithic steps, one can almost hear the reverberation of the voice, the lifting of the soul as it passes through deep, sacred spaces. Light plays an important role, warming and chilling the stone and accentuating the finely-hewn details. Invoking architectural styles from ancient and medieval histories, Simmonds visually and emotionally connects us with a Western cultural past; as his artist’s statement compellingly describes, “Drawing on the formal language and philosophy of architecture, the work explores themes of positive and negative form, the significance of light and darkness, and the relationship between nature and human endeavour “ (Source)

Visit Simmonds’ website to see an impressive collection of his work.

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