Get Social:

Mehmet Gozetlik’s Neon Signs Transform Popular Logos Into Chinese Characters

mehmet gozetlik designmehmet gozetlik designmehmet gozetlik design

Artist Mehmet Gozetlik has designed a series of popular trademarks into neon signs. The series called Chinatown takes popular logos and adds a description of the represented product in chinese neon letters. The sign’s unusual characters reminisce experiences tourists have wandering aimlessly throughout the world’s Chinatowns letting themselves get seduced by these exotic bright letters. The irony is that nine out of ten times the logo itself is recognizable on its own and the words are unnecessary.  Is there anyone on the planet who cannot identify Starbucks or Pepsi brands on sight?

Mehmet’s signs are made from handblown painted glass. Each letter and product logo is stenciled out and designed from a printed drawing. The process of blowing glass is long and tedious. The flame has to be exactly the right temperature in order for it to mold into the desired shape. After it hardens the glass is painted. Upon studying the signs and seeing them together you realize people cannot digest more than a few colors at once when making a decision. Each logo Mehmet chose has three colors or less which is not a coincidence. It’s been documented that the brain can only handle six choices at once. If it goes over that number it shuts down. Corporate culture wouldn’t dream of this happening and explains why these logos are kept simple.

A few years ago, Gozetlik designed another interesting series which minimized logo packaging. The study “Minimalist effect in the maximalist market” showed how a product becomes more desirable as the packaging is stripped away. He used brands such as Nutella and Pringles to achieve this goal.   (via designboom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Photographer Kat Alyst Collaborates With Artists And Designers To Create An Iridescent Virtual World

Kat Alyst, Adela Andea - Photography/InstallationKat Alyst, Adela Andea - Photography/InstallationKat Alyst, Adela Andea - Photography/InstallationKat Alyst, Adela Andea - Photography/Installation

In this stunning series, photographer Kat Alyst — along with several other Texas-based artists and designers (credits below) — has captured an iridescent virtual world that presents an imaginative vision of our relationship with new technologies and alternate realities. Garbed in a flowing, holographic robe and ornamented with Shalottlilly’s colorful, Victorian-inspired jewelry, the model resembles an ethereal cyber goddess as she navigates the otherworldly space. The shimmering, crystalline structure surrounding her is the work of installation artist Adela Andea and is located in Houston’s Anya Tish Gallery. Together, these artists have fused their passions for dream-rich colors and surrealist, futuristic art to create a series of portraits that captivate us with their representations of alienesque beauty and a cybernetic utopia.

On her website’s Artist’s Statement, Adela Andea eloquently describes what motivates her to create the kinds of colorful, electronically-infused works like the one featured in this shoot. For her, art is an active navigation between spaces (in particular, that of “people and technology”), as well as the layers of reality:

“I like to transform the indoor spaces into installations that involve full sensory experiences for the viewers. I use all the space [that] is available to expand for the purposes of the installation. I consider all physical aspects of the building and the level of audience involvement. Where films and video games convey a futuristic approach generating virtual realities, my art is trying to deconstruct the clear, delimiting line between reality and virtual reality.” (Source)

By enmeshing the presence of the model and her corresponding design into the installation, Adela Andea’s work becomes a living environment, unveiling to us an immersive, parallel universe. Kat Alyst’s portraits do an incredible job capturing the dream-like narrative for us, which is beautiful in its representation of cybernetic worlds; just as Adela Andea strives to “vindicate the malign[ed] consequences of technology on the environment and inspire new, exciting ways to infuse technology” (Source), the world these artists have created is an alluring, corporeal exploration of our identities in cyber space.

The credits for the artists and designers involved are listed below. Be sure to check out their pages, as well as the rest of the images after the jump.

Photographer: Kat Alyst (website) (Facebook)
Installation artist: Adela Andea (website)
Model: Blue Madrigal (Instagram)
Designer: Made in Heaven by Stephen Macmillan Moser (Facebook)
Hair/Makeup: Missy Espelien Shear Style & Colorful Techniques (Facebook)
Jewelry: Shalottlilly (Facebook) (Etsy)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Amir Nikravan’s Deceivingly Flat Pattern Covered Paintings

various small fires   various small fires

various small fires

various small fires

Amir Nikravan-painting

Enter the gallery of premeditated patterns by Amir Nikravan. Envision a blank city sidewalk with freshly poured concrete and carefully combed patterns—some resembling giant thumbprints. His paintings create a galaxy of perceptions through repetitious surfaces with hidden fabric, heaped in layers of paint.

Deceivingly flat from a far and pickled close to the eye. This illusion is demonstrated through his use of photorealism in combination with painting and photography; his muted color palette supports this physical illusion.

Primarily delicate shades of whale gray occupy his paintings, along with earthy tones including sapphire blues and burnt siennas—walking into a space of pieces by Amir Nikaven might feel like San Francisco on a beautiful foggy day. A softness and mellowness exudes from the rough textures he perfects in his work. This mix of harsh contours and subdued color present them with a bittersweet perception.

Currently Trending

Beth Cavener Stichter’s Life-Size Animal Sculptures Express More Emotions Than A Greek Tragedy

Beth Cavener Stichter - clay sculpturesBeth Cavener Stichter - clay sculpturesBeth Cavener Stichter - clay sculptures Beth Cavener Stichter - clay sculptures

Sculptor Beth Cavener Stichter carves dramatic, expressive human-size animals from clay which exhibit the extremes of human characteristics and emotions. She has goats, wolves, lambs, snakes and rabbits display acts of greed, betrayal and jealousy. Using the malleable nature of clay, Stichter produces wonderfully sensitive pieces loaded with drama and theatricality.

In her latest series Four Humors, she takes a theory developed by the Ancient Greeks which describes what a psychologically healthy human body should look like. The Four Humors were black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood. If a body had too much of any of these substances, then that would correspond to a personality deficiency. Stichter says she was intrigued that people could be evaluated solely by the amount of liquid they contained in their bodies. Stichter explores multiple base theories and ideas in her work. She goes on to say:

There are primitive animal instincts in our own depths, waiting for the chance to slide past a conscious moment. The sculptures I create focus on human psychology, stripped of context and rationalization, and articulated through animal and human forms. On the surface, these figures are simply feral and domestic individuals suspended in a moment of tension. Beneath the surface they embody the impacts of aggression, territorial desires, isolation, and pack mentality. (Source)

See if you can recognize yourself in more of her sculptures after the jump. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Currently Trending

Jefta Hoekendijk Glittering Photos Capture Vibrant Movements From Metallic-Coated Nude Models

Trish-Ya2 Jefta Hoekendijk Jefta Hoekendijk  Jefta Hoekendijk

Photographer Jefta Hoekendijk’s series Aura features shimmering bodies in motion and dazzling colors. The feel of these images is electric as nude models are coated from head to toe with a metallic covering. Bright greens, purples, teals, and more radiate from their every movement.

The eye-catching effect was done without the use of post-production enhancements. “This is metal body paint and lighting effects directly made [from] shooting,” Hoekendijk writes. Any sort of movement will cause these trails of jewel-toned light. The result is a series of seductive and alluring photos where you’re focused on the invisible now made visible.

Hoekendijk experiments with painting, photography, sculpture, and video that’s centered around movement and the human body. Above all, his work is interested in the body as a vessel for expressing his varied artistic voice.

Currently Trending

Prayer Nuts Carved To Incredible Detail Will Have You In Disbelief

16th Century Prayer Nuts

16th Century Prayer Nuts

16th Century Prayer Nuts

If you think carving a pumpkin is challenging, wait until you see the “prayer nuts” made by Dutch artists in the 16th century. These small, neurotically detailed treasures were carved from a single nut to resemble religious scenes. Each nut holds a spectacularly complex scene that contains a numerous amount of characters to construct religiously important events such as the crucifixion. All of this amazingly crafted imagery is inside a nut that is only a few inches in diameter! Not only are the interiors of the nuts carved into a fine detail, but the outsides are elaborately carved as well. The exterior shell of each nut features a decorative design carved into it, which is revealed once the prayer nut is closed. This way, whether the nut is open or closed, it shows off its stunning design.

Artisans created these delicate masterpieces during the Middle Ages so that individuals could use them privately when they pray. They were small enough to be carried in a person’s pocket and beautiful enough to hang on a rosary. Because the prayer nuts such took incredible skill, not to mention an unbelievably steady hand, only the wealthy and powerful could afford them. Because of this, they also became a social status of wealth. The same thing can be said about many products in contemporary society. Possessing something expensive that creates a convenience to you and can also fit in your pocket – this is not unlike the modern day smart phone. Valuable and beautifully crafted items are still in high demand today. However, these 16th century prayer nuts are much more rare than the latest iphone. They can be found in museum collections all over the world including the British Museum in London and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.(via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

Cheuk Lu Lo’s Mysterious PhotographsOf Stylishly Shampooed Hair

Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography Cheuk Lun Lo - Photography

Photographer Cheuk Lun Lo‘s series of hair in media rinse is stylish and playful. The hair is teased into tangles and swirls, white shampoo tinting the curves like seafoam. Some of the spikier specimens begin looking like sea creatures if you stare at them too long; another is reminiscent of a hedgehog. One photo, an unassuming, almost shy curl of hair, looks like something you might find in a shower drain — a big cowlick, basically.

According to My Modern Met, Lo’s photo series first appeared in the Chinese magazine Numero Magazine. The photo series in a way defies conventional standards of beauty: the meticulous grooming, the impeccably ironed clothes, the put-together and perfectly powdered face. Instead, Lo’s photos show that the unusual can be captivating; pinned to a dark background, these half-washed yet fully conceived hair styles are mysterious and lovely in a way that perhaps wouldn’t be possible for a finished product with a shiny veneer. (via My Modern Met)

Currently Trending

Sponsored Post: GraphicStock, An Endless Resource Of Stock Images For Artists And Designers

graphic stock

graphic stock

graphic stock

graphic stock

graphic stock

Anyone working in design, web development, or marketing can empathize and relate to the fact that building proper content can be a LOT of work. It is tedious, detail oriented, and sometimes totally painstaking. But, we all know that creating depth and draw to your concept is crucial, and so is nailing the visuals. No matter what it is- a website, business cards, smartphone apps, video game design, a presentation, product labels, a design pitch, anything- you need the right image. You get the visuals right, you nail the concept.

 As with tackling any process, you have to have your tools. The resources and items you need to get your work done right. All artists and designers have their programs and websites where they draw inspiration from. GraphicStock is one of those tools. It’s a resource with endless possibilities. As a website full of stock graphics and images, any image you can fathom is on this site. GraphicStock is really intuitive and user friendly: You search the keywords of what you’re looking for, scroll through the results, download the images you need, and you’re done! GraphicStock is constantly adding more images to the site so you will never run out. The best part? Once you have the image it is YOURS, royalty free, forever. Use it all you want, without having to worry about copyright issues. Their whole mission is to provide high quality imagery at a price point that working people, artists, and students can afford.

To kick off the New Year GraphicStock is running a great special: Sign up now you to get a 7 day free trial of unlimited downloads. You can cancel your subscription at any time so, there’s no reason not to give it a shot. Don’t miss out on this tool! It’ll make your workflow endlessly more efficient.

Currently Trending