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Jeremy Olson’s Geometric Portraits

geometric portaits

geometric portaits

geometric portaits

Jeremy Olson, an artist based in Brooklyn, New York, is interested in geometry and simultaneous perspective. Much like the canonical works of Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, Olson looks at portraits in a different manner; the intricate ways in which he chooses to scramble the geometric pieces that make up the sitter’s face, makes for a fun time. The viewer must intently figure out which pieces go where to make sense of the portrait as a whole.

Aside from his interest in geometry, Olson, also plays with traditional painterly portrait styles by using a hyperreal approach. By including all of these three elements [geometry, traditional and hyperreal portraiture], the artist breaks down the face into a spectrum of beauty that simultaneously makes for a violent yet charming visual. (via Ignant)

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Emma Munger Illustrates The Ladies Of “Twin Peaks” As Sexy Pin Up Tattoos

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San Francisco-based illustrator Emma Munger combines two things that popular culture holds dear – the television show Twin Peaks and Sailor-Jerry style tattoos. She’s reproduced the classic flash pages you see in tattoo shops with characters from the bizarre David Lynch production. But, there’s a twist. Instead of a straightforward look at Audrey Horne, Laura Palmer, and the Log Lady, they are done in a pin up style.

The amusing mashup may never make you look at Twin Peaks the same again. Munger draws some characters sexier and some homely characters unnecessarily seductive.

Now that you can imagine these pinups on arms, legs, and other body parts, the real question is  – would you ever get one tattooed? If so, which one? (Via Dangerous Minds and Welcome to Twin Peaks)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Running on Seeds Ai Weiwei Protest at Tate Modern

 

On May 1st  three american art students decided to jump the barriers surrounding Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds piece at the Tate modern’s Turbine hall. This action was in protest against the barrier, against the original intentions of the work being inhibited by health and safety (originally museum visitors were to walk on the seeds), to support the release of Ai Weiwei by the Chinese government, and promote freedom of speech and art. The biggest surprise in the video comes when dozens of other museum members joined the three students in a spontaneous group protest. Now that’s power to the people! Watch the full video after the jump!

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BEST OF 2011: Colin Chillag’s Deconstructed Portraits

I love these ultra detailed, goopy portraits by Colin Chillag!

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Qiu Minye Captures Light And Time Standing Still In These Glowing Photographs

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In his new show “My GodQiu Minye presents us with a new way of seeing. Well, he at least offers us a new way of experiencing objects and the recording of those 3-dimensional things with photography. By painting with light, Minye has suggested different forms of objects that could be real, and then photographed them, resulting in haunting, iridescent, airy images. Whether it is an outline of several figures huddled together watching something in the distance, or an ambiguous geological shape, mythological creatures or floating forms of babies, these snapshots all belong to another space and time.

Minye’s playful images all have a gracefulness to them, and more than most photographs seem to have successfully frozen a moment in time. By removing any fussy details (whether it is light, shadow or color) that may anchor an object in the mundane, he has elevated the idea of the object/subject to something majestic and mystical. The fish for example seems to spitting sparks of fire and is caught in an ethereal state – in a way we don’t see our everyday fish. Minye has managed to capture some sort of life force or see-able movable energy and it is a very calming thing to witness. He has a very existential approach to his art. He poses numerous questions when speaking about his past photographic projects:

What part of humanity is lost in time? How can we transform these moments into eternity? There are always two worlds, the world of yesteryear that has collapsed and the real world. Here, it is to travel between the two. (Source)

Minye seems to be coercing a particular response out of his audience – suggesting we look at the things surrounding us in an abstract, philosophical way – where it’s more about the idea of the thing rather than the tangibility of it. (Via Designboom)

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Artist Interview: Salão Coboi

Salão Coboi is not a singular artist like you’d assume from the sound of the name, but rather a collective of individuals based in Portugal. They hit major attention on the blogosphere in 2011 when they did a project named Generation H, in which they sculpted figures wearing clothes modeled after actual items by haute couture houses like Prada, Alexander Wang, and Junya Watanabe. And there’s just something charmingly unique and European about the characters Salão Coboi create, which really makes me feel the same positive energy I get whenever I look at the wonderful designs of The Yellow Submarine and Wallace & Gromit. However, Salão Coboi have taken that kind of work to the next level by making it not just for children, but also adults as well. Beautiful/Decay featured the work of Salão Coboi a lift bit ago HERE.

 

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Spanish Artist Antonio Santin’s Deceptively Realistic Rug Paintings

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Upon first glance, these paintings by Spanish artist Antonio Santin appear to be photographs of beautiful rugs with bodies hidden underneath. Take a closer look and you can see the amazing detailed work that Santin has created in order for these rugs to appear real. Using a deeply-rooted tradition of Spanish Tenebrism and his training as a sculptor, Santin paints using the play of light and shadow to create depth and a haunting realism.

Interested in the way bodies shape fabrics, in an interview with Hi-Fructose, he says, “Painting is essentially a superficial activity, the artist’s psychology translates into a certain colored texture that will in turn eventually trigger or host the unique psychology of the beholder. Thus, according to this transitional synesthesia, any represented face is an enlivened mask. My background is sculpture, a discipline that could as well be defined as the development of structural strategies that end up supporting a surface. Not being its main raison d’être, the surface does conceal and contain the essence of the volume, whose physicality permeates its vessel while existing often only in the territory of the imagination. Therefore, whether it is a face, a dress or a rug, for me, it’s all about grasping what is hidden or concealed.  (via from89)

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