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Jason Maloney

halfof1Half of Everything is Fair…

 

Jason Maloney’s work is clever and oh so true. His paintings and drawings obviously stem from events in his past, but when transformed into these amazing pieces everyone can relate to them. Maloney is known as a “Pop Surrealist” who received formal training in painting and drawing at Cal State Fullerton.  His work can easily be identified by his consistent use of cut outs, wide range of bright colors, and attention to detail.  Skateboard graphics from the 1980’s, horror films, and heavy metal music inspired Maloney throughout his life and is probably the reason why he has recently been doing graphic work for clothing and skateboard products. I find a lot of his paintings and drawings very personally inspiring. I can’t help but look at all the details in each piece and all I want to do after looking at his work is CREATE.

 

Jason Maloney has also painted some public murals and currently draws and paints in Newport Beach, CA.

 

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Mark Jenkins’ Art Pushes Women Off Of Buildings

street art Sculpture

street art Sculpture

Mark Jenkins - Sculpture

Mark Jenkins’ sculptures occupy the uncanny valley. His work, in which he recreates the human body, places “people” into odd and often disturbing situations. Some of them are as fantastic as they are strange. One of the most interesting parts of Jenkins’ work is the way they are installed. His people are on the streets. They are life sized and dressed in conventional clothing, so they look as though they belong in the landscape. In reality, they don’t. His sculptures are standing in trash cans, on the edge of buildings, face first into a public fountain, and more.

Seeing Jenkins’ work amongst people is partially what makes it so successful. Seeing the reactions of others to these sculptures is both amusing and at times discerning. People walk by them as if they are nothing, as if they are completely normal. Sure, they stare at them, but they are never captured intervening on their behalf. Some, of course, aren’t believable. Others, like a woman stuck in a trashcan or laying on the top of the billboard would elicit some reaction. But, instead, she remains in the can.

The subversive nature of Jenkins’ installations is satisfying, especially if you are in on the joke and know it’s all fake. You could watch people for hours as they pass by, try and interact with the sculptures, and ultimately fail. The artist is taking the art outside the gallery and entering a world that combines art lovers and non-art lovers alike. (Via Hi Fructose)

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Caleb Brown’s Cultural Allegories

Caleb Brown paints real things — sharks, diving tigers, track stars — in a realistic manner. Deviation lies in the implausible situations he inserts his subjects into. Brown uses what he calls “elements of contemporary life” to set the stage for a bigger, more interesting angle on current events.

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Jeffrey Meyer

Jeffrey Meyer

 

Jeffrey Meyer‘s  latest investment is creating a series of collages. Maybe not a series, but a bunch of collages. They’re retro and weird and fun and bright and everything we here at Beautiful/Decay love and adore… including space and high-waisted pants.

 

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Heidi Norton’s New Age Still Lifes

heidi norton

Get in touch with your third eye with Heidi Norton‘s new age still lifes.

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Shamus Clisset Renders Morbid And Humorous Versions Of Reality In B/D’s Book 8: Strange Daze

Shamus Clisset - Digital art Shamus Clisset - Digital art Shamus Clisset - Digital art Shamus Clisset - Digital art

Shamus Clisset (aka, Fake Shamus) is a digital artist who uses 3D modeling software to construct bizarre and often humorous scenes that multiply reality and critique consumer culture. His work is featured in Beautiful/Decay’s Book 8: Strange Daze, a curated collection of talented artists who explore the realms of the uncanny: parallel universes, psychedelic dream states, supernatural activity, and more. Also included in the book is the work of Neil Krug, a photographer who drenches his shots in hallucinatory colors, bending time and reality to invoke the nostalgia and liberatory zeal of the 1960s. Andrea Wan, a Berlin-based artist, also brings her own flavor of absurdity to the book in the form of surreal illustrations of masked and multiple-headed beings. Strange Daze is ideal for those art lovers and dreamers who wish to challenge everyday banality by exploring alternative visions of the world.

We featured Clisset’s work in 2011, when he was making insane (and often violent) mashed-up universes of trash and cultural signifiers. Since then, Clisset has rebirthed his artistic identity as “Fake Shamus,” a “digital golem” formed out of 3D-rendered objects (Source). The shapes this humanoid beast can take are limitless; in one image he is a mystical being upholstered in grass who summons a collection of empty beer cans; in another he is an industrious builder, his muscular body made out of what appears to be lumps of brightly-colored Plasticine. And while Clisset’s works may appear to have photographic elements, do not be deceived; everything in his images is created in a digital, 3D space. By mimicking reality, Clisset brings up fascinating questions of “authenticity” versus “fakery,” unveiling in the process that the entire world is a strange construction subject to our perception.

To see our feature on Clisset and similar artists, check out Book 8: Strange Daze. Copies are available at a limited quantity in our shop, so grab yours today.

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Artist Of The Day: Hannu Karjalainen

Hannu Karjalainen’s photos of paint covered figures are absolutely amazing. I love how the paint takes on the texture and detail of the fabric and brings out every single stitch.

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Kimberly Clark’s Severed Head

Artist collective Kimberly Clark present the hedonistic but also deeply disturbing image of an exaggerated nightlife, on the borderline of excess. Scenes from parties, static images or movements in suspension and representations of blissfulness, provocation, glamour, desolation, boredom, stimulation, the concentrated remains of a nightlong euphoria jumbled together with cosmetics (empty Marlboro packets, bottles and cans of beer, lipstick, etc), compose a kind of group portrait (or self-portrait?) with explicit signs of psychological fluctuation. At the centre is always the female figure, trendy attractive, narcissistic and, at the same time, a live-size simulacrum, juxtaposing stereotypes of the female identity with shocking views of the night and mounds of consumer rubbish.-Thanos Stathopoulos

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