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Jason Borders’ Carves Insanely Detailed Patterns Into Animal Skulls And Bones

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Jason Borders has been collecting different animal skulls from before he started school. Always looking for more objects to add to his cabinet of curiosities, he explored his local neighborhoods picking up bits of bones and cartilage. Years later, he has turned that obsession into an art form, showcasing his talent in galleries, shops and collections around the country. He carves patterns and designs that resemble traditional Mehndi tattoos. He usually lets the shape of the skull or bone that he is working on dictate the design he carves. He then covers the work in ink or a striking color.

Borders remembers the day his hobby turned a bit more serious with amusement. After discovering the carcass of an elk while in the desert, and loading it all into his car – an action that almost got him arrested, took it back to his garage. There he cleaned the bones and noticed something that helped him take his craft to the next level.

Looking at the Dremel and looking at the bones next to each other, I picked it up and started working on it. The garage was right underneath my house, and I ended up filling the house with bone dust, and made myself really sick and made my wife really angry. Then I did it another four years, but I’m much more careful these days. (Source)

Borders also paints and carves other items, but has a particular affinity toward skulls. He treats his work as a way of overcoming his fears – particularly ones concerning mortality. He says because he is always working with the idea of death – quite literally,  it helps him live his life with intent and purpose. And what a great purpose he has found. (Via Faith Is Toment)

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While Visiting Uganda, Photographer Stumbles Upon A Bizarre Set Of Faceless Portraits

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While visiting the town of Gulu in Northern Uganda, Italian photographer Martina Bacigalupo discovered a very unusual set of studio portraits. Despite being perfectly composed, none of them featured a subject’s face as they were all cut out leaving blank rectangles in the photograph. Oddly enough, it appeared to be a common practice in Gulu for taking ID photos.

Bacigalupo visited Uganda searching for ways to document this community, which was suffering from violent conflicts. The first faceless photograph she had stumbled upon lead her to meet Obal Denis, the owner of the oldest photography studio in town, the Gulu Real Art Studio (est. 1973).

“The portraits were well composed, with subjects seated on a chair or on a bench, with a blue, white or red curtain behind them, in various poses and modes of dress. Obal <…> told me the secret behind those pictures: he only had a machine that would make four ID photos at a time, and since most of his clients didn’t need four pictures, he therefore preferred to take an ordinary photograph and cut an ID photo out of it.”

For Bacigalupo, these ‘leftover’ images were the purest form of representation of Gulu’s society. She gathered the unused prints and interviewed clients of Obal’s studio. To most Ugandans, who suffered from more than two decades of war, taking new ID photos marked important changes in their lives: getting a driver’s license, starting a new job or applying for a loan. The value of such events is perfectly conveyed through the subject’s pose, gesture, clothing and other subtle details.

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2D-3D-4D!!!

 

 

Alex McLeod creates representations of reality using 3d imaging software. I’m not sure what his exact process is but the images simultaneously look real and fake… It’s interesting enough work for me to be officially intrigued….

 

 

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Nelson Balaban

XTCNelson Balaban is an illustrator/designer working in Sao Paulo. At 20 years of age, he has worked with some impressive clients including Adidas, Diesel, Coca-Cola, and Oakley. He is now the art director working for Cisma @ Paranoid BR. For a bigger list of his clients and more of his work check out his site or follow him on the Behance network.

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Photographs Of Istanbul Protests Unlike Those In Any Newspaper

Barbaros Kayan photography6 protest Occupy Gezi Park protest

During the summer of this year a small group of people struggled to preserve a public park.  Quickly the scope widened, crowds grew, and the underlying anger became about something much larger than a park.  The demonstrations were considered to be widely peaceful.  At times, however, emotions and force erupted with violence.  Photographer Barbaros Kayan was on the ground to capture the unfolding protests.  There is a subtle difference about his series Occupy Taksim that distinguishes it from much of photojournalism covering the events, a certain frank grittiness.  Its almost clear from the images, the photographer is familiar with the city, intimate with the battleground.

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The Collaborative Paintings Of Young Sons

Michael Ricioppo drew liverman painting

Michael Ricioppo drew liverman

Drew Liverman

I’ve known Drew Liverman longer than most other people in my life. Since the age of 14 we’ve gotten into all sorts of trouble together. At times we’ve lost touch for a year here or there but I feel a special connection to him that only happens when you spend your formative teenage years skateboarding and getting in trouble for graffiti together. One thing has been made clear over the last two decades of friendship with Drew. This guy is a creative super talent. I’ve always admired Drew’s creative abilities with anything that he takes on, whether it be our teenage graffiti shenanigans or his raw ability to jump from design, illustration, or painting with ease. With that said it’s no wonder that Young Sons, Drew’s latest collaborative project with Michael Ricioppo is also a visual feast.

Young Sons takes the concept of collaborative painting to new heights. Mixing a cornucopia of visual references from abstract expressionism to saturday morning cartoons, Ricioppo and Liverman work back and forth in unison and with intuitive speed canceling out, editing, and adding to one another’s marks. The result is a controlled chaos of line and form that is a bold mix of stream of consciousness and disciplined control.

See the work of Young Sons at Mass Gallery in Austin Texas through November 24th 2013 and read Andrew Bourne’s interview with them on Bomb.

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Charles Martin

5twins Charles Martin is an artist working out of NYC/SF. His paintings and drawings are simply beautiful. The shapes he uses add new dimensions to works that would otherwise seem flat. His drawings resemble the figures, shapes and doodles an artist stuck in math class would create. Check out his work on his website. There is definitely something for everyone.

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Pinar Yoldas

UROGENITAL FOLDS


UROGENITAL FOLDS

Pinar Yoldas is a designer, artist, architect, and organic chemistry enthusiast. Her work is a reflection of her interests in neuroscience, evolution, gender studies and science fiction. In her work she explores new materials and new production tools in order to blend conventional media with digital media. I remember seeing these sculpture/organisms (often resembling the female anatomy) at the UCLA Design | Media Arts (both of our alma maters) 2nd Year grad show Exit Strategies. I was significantly and equal parts titillated and fascinated at these creatures, seemingly inanimate yet surreal-y possessing life like qualities. We’re also throwing a fundraiser party for her injuries and medical bills from multiple biking related accidents tonight in Echo Park (come come!). Check out the flyer after the jump!

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