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Ye Hongxing’s Swirling Mosaics Are Made Up Of Thousands Of Cutesy Stickers

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Image via Art Lexing

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Image via Art Lexing

Photo via Oh Olive

Image via Oh Olive

From a distance, artist Ye Hongxing’s works on canvas appear like pointillism technique, as if it’s thousands of tiny painted dots occupying a single canvas. But, as you look closer, her images are much more than that. The small spots of color are actually decorative stickers! Cartoonish dogs, cats, fruit with faces, smiling raindrops, and virtually any cutesy design under the sun make up the complex compositions. They’re a collision of subject matter, and you’ll find pop culture icons, animals, flowers, and historical references are just some of the things you’ll find in these swirling works.

The dizzy mosaic are meant to fuse traditional Chinese imagery with contemporary society. Religious statues, for instance, flow into Darth Vader’s mask. This juxtaposition is the artist’s reflection on China and how its culture has been influenced by the West. “Using stickers is a conscious challenge to traditional and conventional mediums,” she writes in an profile for the Lux Art Institute. “A sticker has an enormous amount of information in it, they reflect the time we’re living in and they are fragmented and mosaic, so I can give them a new order in the landscape I’m creating.”

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Mister Finch’s Upcycled Fairy Tale Objects

Mister Finch - Sculpture

Mister Finch - Sculpture Mister Finch - Sculpture

Mister Finch - Sculpture

Artist Mister Finch is a seamster, dollmaker, and reclaimer of lost souls. He works in discarded trinkets and found objects, cobbling them together into sculptures and models from a strange and much more wondrous place. “Scraps of thread, fabric and paper are stitched and pulled into fairytale creatures looking for new owners and worlds to inhabit,” the splashpage to his webpage proclaims. “They hide in the woods, behind masks, some have died along the way and are buried under spoon lockets.”

For inspiration, Mister Finch turns to nature and his native British folklore. “British folklore is also so beautifully rich in fabulous stories and warnings and never ceases to be at the heart of what I make,” he says. “Shape shifting witches, moon gazing hares and a smartly dressed devil ready to invite you to stray from the path.” The fantastical touch of myth and fairy tale can be seen in the inviting curl of pristine pastel toadstools and creatures that are half fox, half human.

By all appearances, the materials of his art have been truly transformed from their former life in this world, becoming something magical along the way. Of his choice to recycle, Mister finch says: “It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work… the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm. A story sewn in, woven in.” (via This Is Colossal)

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Photographer Statia Grossman’s Seething (But Funny) Visuals About Her Ex-Lover

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The therapeutic effects of art can reveal itself in wonderful and mysterious ways. It can also be a sarcastic “f” you given the proper creator. Photographer Statia Grossman, who fits into the second category,  has just released her first book on Amazon, entitled “Sh*t You Left Behind”, a series of pictures taken with her ex-lover’s items. Judging by the pix and comments, it wasn’t a happy breakup. No, this was definitely filled with much drama and Grossman appears as a woman scorned. It’s an interesting study into what drives people and what they hold dear to them. Since Grossman is a photographer,  her sensitivity to the visual image is at a high level and each of the photographs hold a memory or hurt hitting home not only to the creator but viewer. Like love, art is universal and things people think important in various situations doesn’t differ much. In this case, sex was probably a big part of the relationship and most of the images shows her in objectified positions with one of his items. We also learn a little bit about him. He was a musician who liked taking pills and didn’t express much emotion. He was also allergic to Grossman’s cat, which she resented.  The project does a good job at revealing compromises we make in the name of love and how we can better serve ourselves next time around. (via artnet)

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Bart Erkamp’s Photos Prove That Pole Dancing Is A Sport

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In recent years, the rising popularity of pole dance fitness has probably conjured up images of darkened strip clubs rather than a serious workout. Netherlands-based Bart Erkamp thought the former, but during the summer of last year, his attitude changed. He dated a woman involved in the sport and learned about its inner workings. It’s a physically demanding activity that’s much more than just an erotic dance. His series titled Pole Fitness highlights the strength and talent needed to complete the moves, which are often suspended in air.

After learning about the sport, Erkamp attended a championship pole fitness competition in Amsterdam. The power and agility of the athletes impressed him, and this struck him as comparable to “artistic gymnastics,” that highlights physical prowess and self expression.

In addition to their athletics, Erkamp was enthralled by the dedication of the participants. They’ve installed poles in their bedrooms, living rooms, and even next to their kitchen. Location doesn’t matter. He highlights this in his subjects’ clear, neatly-kept homes. Contorted legs, torsos, and arms are wrapped around bright silver poles.

It’s not all women, either. Erkamp explains that in 2014, several men completed at the World Championships in Rio de Janeiro. And, there’s even a possibility that it’ll be an official Olympic sport in 2016. (Via Feature Shoot)

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D-BROS’ Mirrored Teacups Create Geometric Harmony With Their Saucers

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D-BROS, a Japanese design company that produces ultra-modern housewares, has crafted the beautiful Waltz Cup and Saucer — a teacup with a mirrored, palladium finish that reflects the geometric patterns of the plate on which it is placed. The product is well-named, for like two dancers, the saucer and cup must be in proximity and working together in order to create a work of art. The product is made out of Hasami porcelain on the island of Kyushu in southern Japan, which is known as one of the world’s great pottery hubs. Each cup is carefully handmade so that the surfaces are completely smooth; “after all, even the slightest scratch would create distortions throughout the reflection.” (Source)

The cups, once removed from their beautiful saucer-companions, will of course reflect everything else surrounding them — the color of your sweater, or whatever ordinary items are lying around your kitchen table, for example. And at ¥7560 (approximately $62.00 USD) per set, the cups and saucers are less practical than a piece of art, but there is something to be said for the integration of art, geometry, harmony, tranquility into our everyday lives; interestingly, these are the spiritual and aesthetic values which are present in the Japanese traditional practice of tea ceremonies (Chanoyu), wherein the functionality and practicality of drinking tea is subsumed into ritualistic acts that achieve refinement, simplicity, beauty, and peace. Thinking of it this way, there is much significance to be appreciated in the harmony and creativity ingrained in D-BROS’ designs.

While sold out elsewhere, the Waltz Cups and Saucers can still be bought from D-BROS. Visit their website and explore some of their other intriguing designs. (Via Laughing Squid)

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Stephan Balkenhol Carves Minimalistic Everyday Figures From Tree Trunks

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German sculptor Stephan Balkenhol‘s carved, expressionless wooden figures and reliefs have many critics wondering just what they are about. Balkenhol sculpts stoic characters standing on top of plinths with minimal detailing, wearing basic, unfussy clothes and who are often staring off in space. His figures are everyday people, caught in a disengaged daydream. Working in African Wawa, Oak, or Lebanese Cedar wood, Balkenhol uses a hammer and chisel to reveal the figure, choosing to leave bits of shavings, knots, grains and cracks visible in the finished piece. The rough hewed sculptures are then painted over in bright block acrylic color, emphasizing the plainness of their shape. Balkenhol manages to remove all personality and emotion from his figures, effectively turning them into a blank canvas, ready for the viewer to project their own story, and interpretation onto them. The artist explains:

I’m perhaps proposing a story and not telling the end, just giving a beginning or fragment. There is still a lot for the spectator to complete… (Source)

Balkenhol has been carving the human form for a few decades now, and has shown it in many different forms. He has figures dancing on top of plinths, carrying out various dance steps; a lady in a green dress with an animal head, standing still with her hands on thighs; a man in black trousers and a white shirt with his hand slouched in his pocket. But all are as nondescript as the next. One critic dissects his work:

In the crowd, the individual is freed from the tyranny of distance and transcends the limits of his own person. If Balkenhol’s heads remain anonymous individuals, it is because they have a memory of the crowd embedded within them. (Source)

Blankenhol’s figures are a little bit of all of us – humans as individuals, and humans as a mass group; the everyday people.

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Ramon Todo Seamlessly Embeds Layers Of Glass Into Stones, Fossils And Books

Ramon Todo - glass, stone

Ramon Todo - glass, stone

Ramon Todo - glass, stone

Ramon Todo - glass, stone

Tokyo born artist Ramon Todo splices pieces of stone, volcanic rock, obsidian, fossils, books and even pieces of the Berlin Wall with translucent layers of glass. Taking raw chunks of natural material and adding highly polished bits of glass, he creates sculptures that are unstated and surprising. The juxtaposition of the sharp hard glass surface wedged in between crumbling porous rock, or forced into obsidian, or slotted into an old frayed book cover is a quiet commentary on the nature of material. By combining these distinctly different materials, Todo is talking about fragility and stability. He questions the very nature of the objects he is working with, and exploits the properties that we understand them by having. He asks us: what makes a rock a rock?

Todo collects the original stones and fossils while out walking (he is based in Dusseldorf), and initially is drawn to them as artifacts of the culture and the land they come from. By inserting something alien into these pieces, Todo is effectively rewriting their history, and the place that these objects hold in the world. With titles like Artificial Stone of Paris; Bois de Boulogne Paris 2007 #4, and o.T. – Spitz, these art works are like something from the shelves of The Natural History Museum, or the Geology Department at a university. They are definitely objects of curiosity, and you can see more of them after the jump.

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Erika Sanada’s Beautifully Creepy Sculptures Of Mutant, Dream-like Animals

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Erika Sanada is a Tokyo-born, San Franscico-based sculptor whose supernatural animal creations traverse the boundary between dream and nightmare. In many ways, her creatures seem soft and gentle — the colors are pale, the textures soft. However, many are riddled with terrifying bodily anomalies: dogs with several rows of fangs, others writhing in agony and tearing at their own skin, and mutant birds bursting out of torsos and faces. The blank, dead eyes of the animals further add to their moral ambivalence; without the pupil — that center of consciousness — their eyes could be those of a gentle, all-seeing spirit, or of the soulless undead.

Whether it is their eyes, human-like skin, or abnormalities (some of the animals appear to be painfully conjoined to others), Sanada’s creations rattle with uneasiness; they are both endearing and unsettling in their suffering and strangeness. In her Artist Statement, Sanada identifies her own experiences with anxiety as the source of her inspiration. “I worry about everything, even tiny things,” she writes. “Anxiety drags my mind to the dark side, which is more powerful and intense than my bright side.” Instead of being paralyzed by such fears, Sanada decided to confront them by molding them into beautiful, hideous life; it is her way of gaining control over her anxiety — and indeed, in embracing her own darkness and transforming it into art.

Sanada recently exhibited at Antler Gallery in Portland, Oregon, and will be showing again at the Flower Pepper Gallery in Pasadena, California, this Februrary. Check out Sanada’s website for a stunning gallery of her beautiful and tortured dream-creatures. (Via Design Faves)

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