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Exclusive Craftsy Online Class Offer “Painting An Allegory: Concept To Canvas”

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At Beautiful/Decay we have been partnering with Craftsy, a cutting-edge, multileveled online art class platform and community that brings art classes to your home with versatility and convenient features.  One of the classes at Craftsy that we think is exceptionally strong in content, instructional style and artistic relevance is “Painting An Allegory: Concept To Canvas” taught by artist Martin Wittfooth. For a limited time only, Craftsy is generously offering this class at the deeply discounted price of $19.99 exclusively to Beautiful/Decay readers (offer expires 12/01/14).

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Olivier De Sagazan’s Dark World

Olivier De Sagazan’s brutal paintings, sculptures, and performances are somewhere between early Nine Inch Nails videos and the nightmares that Tim Burton has after watching his own movies.

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Cat Obsession Has A Long Multi-Cultured History In Japan

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Our obsession with cats has a long and multi-cultured history. Long before Grumpy, Garfield and Felix, the Japanese were depicting cats in their artwork. A new exhibit set to open at New York’s Japan Society entitled “Life of Cats” studies the feline’s depiction during the Japanese Edo period. The period comprises a little over 250 years between 1615-1867, that saw a prolific use of cats (hi harmony), particularly in pieces made from Ukiyo-e woodblock prints. The printing technique was initially introduced to distribute texts of Buddhist scriptures. In 1765 a new technology made it possible to produce a single sheet using up to 20 colors. This allowed artists to take full advantage of palette and soon cats were appearing in a multitude of roles.
The first cat surfaced in Japan around the sixth century. They were brought over from China on ships transporting sacred scrolls written by monks. The Buddhists believed cats were mindful creatures and when an enlightened person died they would first come back as a cat before reaching nirvana. The exhibit at Japan Society is divided up into 5 categories: Cats and people, Cats as people, Cats vs. people, Cats transformed and Cats and play. Since the woodblock prints mainly depicted courtesans and Kabuki actors we see these figures in numerous works interacting with cats. The colors are exquisite and most of the scenes between human and feline is endearing. Some of the weirder prints are hybrid looking cat people and as mentioned earlier stems from the Buddhist belief of an enlightened being transforming into a cat before reaching nirvana. A popular motif was the common leisurely activities of a village, in these we see cats role playing as people relaxing at spas and playing in parks.  (via hyperallergic)
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Aaron Leif Nicholson

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Aaron Leif Nicholson has an affinity for creating life-sized sculptures of imposing characters (like witch doctors and Yetis) that seem to have stepped straight out of a nightmare. Nicholson’s “Coney Island Star Man” is a prime example: faceles and hunched over the ground, he lurks on a beach as if he’s watching you. Nicholson brings his sculptural background to other works as well, which include mixed-media drawings and paintings, lending traditionally two-dimensional art a three-dimensional quality.

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Chris McMahon And Thryza Segal Turn Old Thrift Shop Paintings Into Pop-Surrealist Gems

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Thyrza Segal

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Don’t we all love to hate those kitschy landscape paintings at the local thrift store? I know I do. But what if we can make them became exciting again?

Artists Chris McMahon and Thryza Segal  give thrift shop paintings new life by embedding monster-like creatures. The finished product resembles a pop-surrealist version of Nickelodeon’s Aaahh! Real Monsters.

Both artist carefully blend the monsters into the original scene as if they were always there. The process can be tricky, since it can be a challenge to match the original textures and colors, but it can be said that their attempts have been a success. They are pretty awesome.

(via Twisted Sifter)

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Jen Garrido’s Bold Strokes

Painter Jen Garrido’s work is bold, simple, yet elegant. Her work reminds me of papercuts, but I love seeing the slight paint texture in each piece. Her work is a combo of small textural paintings, and small minimal works that seem to fit together just right. Her two styles compliment one another instead of challenging. I’d be curious to see what she can do with much larger works in the future. 

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Andrew Clark

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London based illustrator Andrew Clark brings together the photorealistic, the abstract, and the geometric. His work seems to hint at the future, while interweaving what feels like folklore into his intricate illustrations. 

 

Clark has created work for magazines, album covers, posters, and corporate identity. 

 

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Ryan Peltier

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Currently Brooklyn based, Ryan Peltier is a talented illustrator who is currently earning his Masters at the School of Visual Arts. He has been featured in publications such as 3×3, American Illustration, and has won awards from the Society of Illustration Los Angeles. His work has been exhibited at BRIC in Brooklyn, and the Tinlark and Billy Shire Fine Arts in Los Angeles.

Ryan’s process depends heavily on the kind of surface he is working on. He makes it a point to begin with beautiful materials that hold character. The outcome is a collection of illustrations with a whole lot of awkward humor, and delightful surrealism.

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