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ENRIQUE MARTĺNEZ CELAYA opens at Simon Lee Gallery

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London’s Simon Lee Gallery presents a new exhibition by ENRIQUE MARTĺNEZ CELAYA titled The Open. The show runs through April 1st – May 12th, 2010, opening March 31st 2010 6-8pm.

Simon Lee
12 Berkeley Street
London W1J BDT
T +44 (0) 20 7491 0100

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Colorful Abstractions Transformed Into Street Art

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Xuan Alyfe street art8

Xuan Alyfe street art7

The pieces of Xuan Alyfe arrive from a variety of influences rarely found in street art.  His work is largely abstract, but peppered with figures and other recognizable objects.  The murals seems to subtly reference minimalist, surrealist, and even graphic design styles.  Aylfe’s art even seems to piece together various influences of other street artists into his own distinct style.  Perhaps appropriately, then, he has exhibited and painted murals worldwide.

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Welcome To The Doll House: Supermodels Pose As Barbie Dolls

Giampaolo Sgura - photography

Giampaolo Sgura - photography

Giampaolo Sgura - photography

Giampaolo Sgura - photography

Italian photographer Giampaolo Sgura has put together a whimsical, colorful photo shoot for the December/January 2015 issue of Vogue Paris with supermodels posing as lifelike Barbie dolls trapped in commercial packaging. He has turned the idea of Prêt-à-porter into something quite literal – into a pre-packaged sartorial commodity that you can carry away. The idea of purchasing a look or an outfit from a catalog is now conceptualized as something that it has always been – a highly stylized and idealized situation amplifying our fantasies and desires.

Supermodels Magdalena Frackowiak and Elisabeth Erm take the place of childlike dolls, dressed up in highly fashionable clothes, surrounded by desirable products and placed in boxes labelled with luxury labels such as Dolce and Gabbana, Chanel, Valentino and Miu Miu. They seem to bring the concept of fashion full circle in that they are now animations of the thing they are selling. Fashion photography has always projected an idealized representation of how one could live in the clothes it markets, this time we are shown the truth of the illusion.

As Alfred Stieglitz once said,

In photography, there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality. (Source)

And that is exactly what Sgura’s photography is. It is so real it becomes surreal. It is a stark commentary of the commodification of fashion. He captures the reality of the representation of modern women in modern times – not just as consumers of fashion, but also as objects. (Via Design Boom)

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Phyllis Galembo’s Witch Doctors

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Phyllis Galembo‘s photos of witch doctors, medicine men, and shamans are creepy, beautiful, and haunting all at once.

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Fawn Fruits

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Fawn Fruits is an illustrator, fine artist and art instructor at Otis College of Art and Design. His illustrations are so unique and beautiful they are hard to ignore.

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Christina Mrozik’s Darkly Beautiful Illustrations Explore The Interconnections Between All Living Beings

Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration Christina Mrozik - Illustration

Living matter thrives and dies within the intricate linework of Michigan-born artist Christina Mrozik. On large pieces of paper, she uses pen, ink, marker, and watercolor to compose semi-surreal visions of nature that are much different from the usual paintings of serene landscapes and friendly animals. Mrozik’s creatures bustle with a quiet ferocity: cranes perching on wolf carcasses split open with their progeny inside; owls flap wildly, trying to escape a rope of viscera that binds them to the roots below. Full of verdant symbolism, it somewhat resembles a twisted Garden of Eden, but it is important not to let the dark imagery overwhelm us; Mrozik’s vision of life-embracing-death (and vice versa) transcends existential horror, arriving at a depiction of nature that gives meaning to death and joins all living things in a greater life process.

The human perception of “nature” is central to Mrozik’s work. In her artist’s statement, she points out the seemingly contradictory “double perception” we have of nature: “it is either something to be glorified, or something to be dominated” (Source). We relish in its beauty and the idea of “untouched” lands, but we also wish to place ourselves above it, to separate ourselves, defining it as an “other” that can be controlled and exploited. Through her organic forms and the fusion of human and animal imagery, Mrozik’s art seeks to dissolve these imaginary boundaries, exemplifying how a sentience exists throughout all living things. As she concludes: “I feel that the basic stories of feeding, migration, shelter, mating, and self awareness are an essential part of our inner being and affect our view of the world both around us and within us.” (Source).

Visit Mrozik’s website, Facebook page, and Instagram to view more of her emotionally gripping and beautiful work.

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Gustaph Meulemans

74671_8366362_lGustaph Meulemans’ use of geomtric shapes and screenprint color quality make his work stand out against todays vibrant and explosive colors. 

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Nicola Constantino’s Fashion Line Covered With Human Nipples

NICOLA CONSTANTINONICOLA CONSTANTINONICOLA CONSTANTINO

In 1998, Argentinian artist Nicola Constantino created ‘Peletería Humana’ (Human fur Boutique), a window display with twenty mannequins showing off Nicola’s heeled shoes, dresses and handbags. These elegant designs were fashion forward in a peculiar way: all pieces were made out of real human hair and colored latex cloth which patterns and textures imitated human nipples. The material, reminiscent of real human skin. was a definite erotic but also sickeningly monstrous and abnormal characteristic that made many recoil in disgust.

The attractive yet repulsive pieces delineate the artist’s ideas about two highly addictive societal desires: expensive consumer goods and sex. By creating these garments out of human hair and cloth that reproduced the human skin, she entices the viewer to see, simultaneously, both desires in the same object. We can also say that her ‘elegant’, high end creations (all which are wearable pieces of art) play with notions of the natural and the artificial, ideas of identity in a consumer society, and the materiality of the human body in contemporary times.

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