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Linn Olofsdotter

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Strange, surreal illustrations by Swedish artist, Linn Olofsdotter.  They’re sweet and scary – simultaneously mechanical and pliable like they’re sculpted out of soft clay over kinked wires.

She was educated in Europe and the US in advertising and design, lived in Brazil and currently calls Portland home  – such of mix of cultures!

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Bulletica

BulleticaBulletica (Bullets + Helvetica) is a free download typeface created by Lucid Mind Designs. Basically it’s Helvetica created from illustrated .22 bullets. It will not be an image font right away, currently it is just a set images including A-Z, 0-9, and some punctuation marks. check it out.

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Evan Gruzis

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Headed over to Brooklyn this morning to Evan Gruzis’s studio, and got to take some photos of his new work – which looks great.  Gruzis is on the Deitch Projects roster, and I asked him if he knows anything about Jeffrey Deitch’s plans for his New York operation and he gave me a flat “No,” but said that the people involved are having a meeting sometime next week.  Gruzis is known for his hyper-skillful use of ink, and his sardonic re-purposing of advertising’s seductive imagery.  In a recent interview he wrote about the work as being “… not product vehicles, but hollow gestures that create a feedback-loop between a familiar aesthetic and a desire for meaning.”  Gruzis has a show in Athens in April at Andreas Melas Presents.

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Shannon Taggart Documents Vodou In The Basements of New York City

New York photographer Shannon Taggart gives us a first hand look into the haitian religion of Vodou being practiced in the basements of New York City. (via)

“Taggart’s project began when she met a Mambo, or female Vodou priest, named Rose Marie Pierre, who runs a temple in the basement of a nondescript storefront in the working class neighborhood of Flatbush. It was here that Taggart made these images of priests and laymen undergoing possession by the Loa—powerful spirits that act as intermediaries between humankind and Vodou’s distant god, Bondye. Most Loa are benign, some are malevolent, but every spirit has a distinct personality, role in the world and set of demands and services. In their different ways, practitioners believe, these spirits determine our fate and must be consulted and appeased.

Beckoning the Loa requires elaborate preparations unique to the particular spirit desired. Practitioners indicate the Loa they want to call upon by drawing its vever, or symbol, in cornmeal sprinkled on the floor. They place offerings on an altar and perform particular songs and dances. When the Loa possesses the worshiper Taggart says the scene becomes “wild, very physical and intense.” Though she works with black-and-white still images, Taggart is able to convey the noise and energy of these rituals. “There is screaming and thrashing…sometimes [congregants] run around the room as if confused. It can happen suddenly, so it’s often jarring. People immediately gather around the one possessed and assist them with what they need and catch them if they collapse.” Practitioners say the experience induces short-term amnesia; “Mambo Rose Marie is always surprised (sometimes shocked) to see my documentation of what has taken place while she was possessed,” recalls Taggart.” – Myles Little 

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Quentin Jones

Quentin Jones is a London-based artist, illustrator, and filmmaker taking the fashion world by storm with her signature brand of cheeky chic. It’s no wonder clients like iconic design house Chanel have fallen head over double C  clad heels for her work — a mixture of collage, pop art, fashion photography, and impressionistic painting. With an uncanny ability to transform bunny ears, cats, and Disney characters into symbols of high fashion, Jones’ playful vision is a much appreciated reminder that fashion is supposed to be fun. 

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Faria Photography

Faria photography

While at Otis to give a talk on the history of Beautiful/Decay I met faculty member Faria who teaches advertising and photography. Here are some shots from his sizzling photography portfolio.

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Interview: Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha is not unlike a medieval alchemist, transmuting discarded materials into works of art—morphing civilization’s dusty detritus into works of stunning beauty. They freely collapse ideological mores, the annals of history, contemporary art, yet transcend concretized fact or fiction. Instead, they resurrect their charred faces, standing as relics from a near distant future, or war-ravaged effigies to a post-apocalyptic past. This practice of temporal and physical shape-shifting seems to be both esoteric and playful at once—Bhabha notes that “turning lead into gold, or at least trying…is more interesting than just using gold.” Her visceral effigies are perhaps best described as “anti-monuments;” her works, in their materiality, do not desire permanence—rather, Bhabha formalizes their very transience through her use of ephemeral, corruptible and humble materials. 

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Philippa Beveridge Reconstructs Memories In Glass Change Purses

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British artist Philippa Beveridge fosters mystery through her series of glass change purses. In an on-going project titled Lost and Found, she reconstructs the dainty-looking accessories with trace amounts of what was left inside. The thick glass resembles an ice sculpture that also gives her work a fleeting, ethereal feel. She describes the sculptures in her writing:

[These] on-going series of works deal with the concept of collective and individual identity through the everyday form of a purse: a belonging which is often lost, stolen or mislaid, full of sentimental value and charged with personal memories. I began to make this work during a three-month long artist’s residency in Northern France. I invited local residents to visit me at the studio and show me the contents of their purses.  Building on the theme of traces, I highlighted the objects and details found in the purses to forge histories and construct identities. The resulting imagery, trapped in the material, expresses notions of time, memories and sentiments which lean towards metaphorical interpretations in relation to one’s own past. (Via The Jealous Curator)

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