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Street Art Made of Tape from Buff Diss

Australian artist Buff Diss brings an interesting medium to the spray paint dominated world of street art: tape.  Intricately cut and stuck, Buff Diss’ often large scale pieces can be astoundingly complex.  Some of his work intentionally interacts, even plays with the surrounding environment.  At other times his work seems to reference classical sculpture and painting.  However, he consistently works in this peculiar medium.  Regarding the reasons for using tape in his process he says:

“The functional or practical nature of tape is one of its best aspects as a medium; you don’t have to walk into a snooty, over-priced art store to find it. The linear quality of tape also makes it a quick medium to work with. Only drawback is looking like you’ve got a stationery fetish when you open your bag.” [via]

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Andrew Sutherland

Luke Stephenson

Glue must be sculptor Andrew Sutherland’s best friend. Objects falling victim to its liquid strength are made from paper: New York Times’ made to look like a from cradle to grave stump of wood, cardboard cut out to create strange optical illusions, newspapers combined with thread and zippers for a lightweight sleeping bag.

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Beautiful Fordite Stones Made With Layered Paint From Old Car Factories

fordite-1Image via Talyer Jewelryfordite-2Image via m e sweeney  fordite-41Image via Forditefordite-31image via Nebbie

Years ago, the American automotive industry was an unparalleled success not only in productivity, but also in the quality of their beautiful car designs. Unbeknownst to these automotive designers, they were also creating something beautiful that would last long after the processes they pioneered went extinct. Fordite (or Motor Agate, or Detroit Agate) as it has become known, was created by the process of hand-spraying cars with enamel-paint. A byproduct of the process, paint slag called “rough” was baked in the ovens, which hardened the automotive paint, creating layered slabs which crafty autoworkers realized could easily be polished, much like the naturally occurring agates they so resembled. Since this process has long been , these remaining stones have found a particular following, as they can never be created again.

Johnny Strategy, who documented much of the story for Colossal, writes, “Old car factories had a harmful impact on the environment, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, land and water. But it wasn’t all ugly. Oddly enough, one of the by-products of car production was Fordite, also known as Detroit agate. The colorful layered objects take their name from agate stones for their visual resemblance. But instead of forming from microscopically crystallized silica over millions of years, Fordite was formed from layers of paint over several tens of years. Back in the day, old automobile paint would drip onto the metal racks that transported cars through the paint shop and into the oven. The paint was hardened to a rock-like state thanks to high heats from the baking process. As the urban legend goes, plant workers would take pieces home in their lunch pails as a souvenir for their wife or kids.” (via mymodernmet, fordite.com, colossal)

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Romain Lenancker

lenancker

Lenancker, out of France, uses colorful, crisp paper to create wonderful works of art. Usually interacting the paper creations with the human form, Lenancker adds dimension and playfulness to his aesthetic.

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Giant Slugs Made of Plastic Shopping Bags in France

The work is made out of 40.000 plastic bags that move in the wind. The slugs are ascending this steep city staircase that leads up to a huge Catholic church, essentially signifying their slow crawl towards death. The work reminds us of religion, mortality, natural decay and the slow suffocation of commercialized societies.

Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman recently completed “Giant Slugs”, the installation pictured above, in Angers, France. (via)

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Studio Visit: Christopher Miller and his auto-drawing machine

Christopher-Miller-csulb-drawing-machine-auto-Long-Beach-photo-by-Daniel-Rolnik-15

Rebecca Manson, one of the current sculptors in residence at Cal State University Long Bech [CSULB], told me I had to drive out to the campus to see what Christopher Miller was working on in his studio. So, with my full trust in her hands, I took the hour long and then some drive from Los Angeles to Long Beach to scope it out. And when I got to Miller’s studio I couldn’t believe what I was looking at. It was a painting machine, but one made out of organic materials like bamboo instead of steel, with markers hanging from strings stretched 5 ft high. The whole thing was powered by several fans that would cause the pens to sway back and forth across a massive sheet of paper, which was taped to the ground. Christopher then had various obstacles placed around his painting surface that the pen could work around. For instance, there was one sculpture composed of about 50 triangles that restricted the motion of the pen as well as one of Rebecca’s ceramic pieces that blocked out certain areas of the paper to create an ever -evolving, uniquely beautiful, and chaotic masterpiece.  I especially love how you can really feel the heart of Christopher’s piece when you see it in person, since every single element is either hand painted or constructed. Even the strings that are holding the pens have little paper accessories attached to them, which remind me of tie-died Mondrian mobiles. Christopher is still working on this particular sculpture and can always use donations of various painting supplies like inks and markers to help progress the work. If you’re interested in helping him out, you can send him a direct email at Chrismmiller[at]hotmail[dot]com. Watch a video of the piece in action after the jump.

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timothy pakron’s Photographs Look Like Loose Ink Drawings

These works by Timothy Pakron may look like magnificently loose ink drawings but they are in fact photographs created using an unorthodox method of exposing film. Pakron’s process begins in the darkroom where he loosely hand paints on the photo developer onto the paper intentionally revealing specific desired areas of the face and neglecting others. The result is a magical image full of lucidity and unsettling strangeness that only hints at the reality of the photograph and challenges the viewer to question both the image and materials that they are confronted with.

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Photographer Documents The Many Objects Her Husband’s Beard Will Hold

Red Poppy Photos by Stacy Thiot

Red Poppy Photos by Stacy Thiot

Red Poppy Photos by Stacy Thiot

Red Poppy Photos by Stacy Thiot

Pierce Thiot and his wife, photographer Stacy Thiot, have been collaborating on an ongoing project titled “Will It Beard” wherein the couple test the limits of what a beard can hold. Pierce tells BuzzFeed, “Over Christmas break, my mom had her grandkids do a talent show for her (she’s an adorable grandma). I tried to put as many pencils as possible in it for my ‘talent.’ I got over 20. Needless to say, my mother was very proud.”

Since then, the couple has put dried pasta, flowers, chips, matches, balloons, scissors, and even Mr. Potato Head pieces into Pierce’s beard. Through this playful series, the Thiots prove there is more to beards than just looking cool. You can keep up with the project’s progress on Tumblr and Instagram. (via moarrr)

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