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Amie Luczkowski Gibson Sculpts Mystical Characters Into Ceramic Planters, Cups, And More

Amie Luczkowski Gibson - Ceramics

Eye Vase

Eye Vase

April & May

April & May

Multi Eye Cup

Multi Eye Cup

Amie Luczkowski Gibson is an Australian artist who creates unique, otherworldly characters in the form of planters, cups, sculptures, and necklaces. Each piece is uniquely molded with its own bizarre facial features and expressions. Recurrent throughout the works are organic shapes and multiplicities, with numerous faces sprouting from the same head or clusters of eyes rippling across ceramic skin. Most of the faces appear contemplative, as if lost in a dream or seeing into another world, emanating a sense of neutrality, wisdom, and intangible mysticism. In a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay, Amie explained the main sources of inspiration for her imagery:

I love how different everyone looks and how there is such beauty in that. Beauty in difference. I get inspired by people’s face shapes, lines, scars — I make my pieces to be as unique as people are. I also get really inspired by the vibe and aura a person gives off more than anything. […] I don’t know how I would describe my work, really. Weird, ugly, and interesting is what most people say about it. Each work is usually based on someone I have seen or met, or just some people’s general energy.

Artists like Amie remind us of the importance of supporting independent artists. As a one-woman show, Amie spends an incredible amount of resources crafting her designs, which — given the time it takes to fire the ceramics — is a  process that can last days. Despite the tendency of our consumerist society to rely on and purchase mass-produced goods, Amie is working hard to produce art lovingly crafted by her own hands and individual vision.

Amie has recently relaunched her online shop, which can be visited here. You can also follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

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Rachel Wrigley Uses Magazine Pages To Create Abstract Sculptures

wrigley sculpturewrigley sculpturewrigley sculpture8a5dcb875e359d005abaa36cf6cbd055
It’s not new when artists try different techniques then combine them with more traditional ones. It only becomes more significant if new ground is broken in the process. In Rachel Wrigley’s case this is certainly true. Her paper sculptures created from pages taken from magazines are turned into organic forms which comment on the transience of nature. By utilizing a material which has already been used for another purpose Wrigley recycles an idea in a formal setting which speaks to several different notions. It reimagines the ready made image with hints of origami and paper cutting techniques taking on characteristics which resemble silhouettes of butterflies, snowflakes and flowers.
The recent work Wrigley has produced turns images of domestic spaces such as living rooms and windows into organic forms. It becomes a play off two sensibilities of idea and material which capture moments that reminisce a sliver of morning light streaming through the window blind highlighting only a portion of the room giving it a new and different perspective. These then become unique abstracted forms found and reimagined within the folds of a paper magazine.  (via lustik)

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Unforgettable, Haunting Photographs Of The Nepal Earthquake’s Aftermath

Probal Rashid - Digital PhotographyProbal Rashid - Digital PhotographyProbal Rashid - Digital Photography

On May 12th, the Nepal earthquake striked, killing dozen and injuring thousands. With a magnitude of 7.3, the earthquake was so large that it affected those living in India and Bangladesh. Documentary photographer Probal Rashid, who currently lives in Bangladesh, documented the aftermath through his lens. These photographs tell a heartbreaking story of those directly in the middle of the chaotic and horrific outcome of such an earthquake. Rashid masterfully reveals poignant images of mothers, fathers, and children living in the current state of their homes and villages. The emotions seen in his photographs strike you to your core, as you are shown a child looking right back at you in the midst of this catastrophe.

Allowing us to see a different aspect of the lives of the people affected by the earthquake, Rashid includes images of the remnants of people’s homes and belongings, creating a more intimate connection. A haunting photograph of the inside of a house in ruins displays an empty couch and chairs, with photographs of the family up on the wall. The city’s culture as well as its people was damaged, as we see a piece of beautiful architecture now almost completely destroyed. Rashid rightly has no sensor, as his photojournalism displays an uninhibited truth. Witnessing so much destruction, Rashid also finds compassion.  Although so much desolation can plainly be seen, there is also a sense of hope. The photographer also chose to capture people trying to help; citizen’s aiding one another.

As humans often identify with each other, it is always difficult to see photos with this kind of content. However, it is very necessary for us to see and understand what is happening to others in a place we may not know very much about. Probal Rashid provides us with a better grasp on how the earthquake has affected Nepal and its people in this unforgettable series.

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Hubert Duprat Collaborates With Flies To Produce Bejeweled Cocoons

Hubert Duprat - fly sculptureHubert Duprat - fly sculptureHubert Duprat - fly sculpture

In a very unique collaboration between man and nature, this exhibition as a part of the Venice Biennale will no doubt impress and amaze you. French artist Hubert Duprat has come up with an interesting and yes, controversial, idea which not only produces a dazzling product and art object, but also comments on the relationship between humans and nature, worker and manager, curator and artist. He has been invited to exhibit his work as a part of the group show Slip Of The Tongue, which addresses friendships, relationships between artists, and the idea

that the activity of the artist is aimed at the preservation and afterlife of objects rather than of their interpretation. (Source)

The art project of Duprat and the Caddis Flies is a perfect example of those themes. He has taken these insects, known for their collecting habits (they naturally collect bits of wood, sand and stones from their environment and build a cocoon around them to fend off any predators) and has instead replaced them with bits of precious and semi-precious stones – rubies, pearls, opals, sapphires, coral, lapis lazuli and diamonds. After several weeks of building up these defensive layers, the insects crawl out of their shells, leaving behind a bejeweled shell.

Critics say Duprat’s practice is no different to acts of animal cruelty, and that he plays no part in making the final product. Duprat even says himself:

……I am playing a bad trick on them… I feel as if I am exploiting my workers….It is their work as much as it is mine. (Source)

And while it is true the Caddis Fly does all of the physical work itself – it’s excreted silk thread is what joins the pieces together – Duprat has applied his imagination and experimentation to turn something quite mundane into something extraordinary. He has made visible what would normally remain unseen, and that is truly an art form. (Via Design Boom)

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Do you know thousands of artists and designers who need to get some well deserved exposure? Do love writing about art and want an outlet? Do you want over a million monthly readers from around the world reading and hanging on your every word? Do you want to join Beautiful/Decay in our quest for all things groundbreaking and creative? If so then we have the perfect job for you!

Beautiful/Decay is looking for a few young writers who are looking to get their foot in the door and contribute to our daily blog. We are looking for smart writers in all corners of the globe who have their fingers on the pulse of the contemporary art and design world and want to join our group of art bloggers.

To apply send a few short writing samples (or links), 5 links to artists who you would like to write about and a cover letter about why you want to join the Beautiful/Decay contributor team to contactbd(at)beautifuldecay.com.

Writers must be able to commit to a minimum of five 300 word posts per week. This is a paid freelance position.

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Martin Roller Constructs Clever Mash-Ups Of Everyday Objects Found In The Streets

Martin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found ObjectsMartin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found ObjectsMartin Roller - Digital Photograph of Found Objects

German artist Martin Roller constructs assemblages of objects in hilarious and astonishing ways in his body of work. Taking found object from the streets of Berlin, he photographs interesting mash-ups of everyday objects and remnants of trash, transforming their original function. Setting the scene similar to commercial photography, each newly created object looks as if it is on display in an ad, waiting to be bought. Who knows, maybe Roller’s banana shoes will be the next big thing, although they are not exactly wearable. This colorful and clever series is both aesthetically appealing, with its perfect color blocking, and intriguing, as each item is not altered digitally.

At first glance, you may think that Roller’s images are digitally spliced photographs that together create the finished product. Although this would take some skill, each object is more impressively built by the artist’s own hand, and therefore, actually exists in real life. Roller explains that we live in an age where technology has given us endless possibilities that are accessible to a vast majority of people. Because these digital alterations, as well hand-cut collages, are so common today, these techniques are of no interest to him. He instead aims to assemble his own “collage” from a more realistic source, the objects themselves.  Each image displays an amazing combination of real life objects, with an eye on modern design.

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Martin Eder’s Atmospheric Paintings Of Fearless And Melancholic Female Warriors

"Blut/Blood". Oil on canvas, 225 x 150 cm.

“Blut/Blood”. Oil on canvas, 225 x 150 cm.

"Inner Reality". Oil on canvas, 150 cm x 100 cm.

“Inner Reality”. Oil on canvas, 150 cm x 100 cm.

"How to Stand". Oil on canvas, 142 cm x 186 cm.

“How to Stand”. Oil on canvas, 142 cm x 186 cm.

"Behind the Curtain". Oil on canvas, 80 cm x 60 cm.

“Behind the Curtain”. Oil on canvas, 80 cm x 60 cm.

Martin Eder is German artist who paints atmospheric portraits, blurring the lines between reality and fantasy in a semi-surreal haze. His recent series involves figures of mythological repute, clad in armor and posing on the battlefield while the background boils with fire, smoke, and blood. Elsewhere, in more subdued scenes, his subjects recline in tender contemplation, or transform — with a silent violence — into a swan. Blending Botticelli-esque classicism with contemporary hyperrealism, Eder’s paintings defy categorization, appealing in their ambivalence to our fantasies through passionate stories radiating courage and melancholia.

Eder’s previous works are known for their flickering touches of eroticism blended with absurdity. Those who see his depictions of women as somewhat fetishized are not mistaken; experimenting with desire (and engaged criticisms) as affirmations of life, Eder asks us, in a rhetorical turn, “isn’t arousal, if it’s present at all, a rebellion against death?” (Source). In his bloodied and battle-wearied warrior portraits, however, Eder seems to be metaphorically driving at something else: a connection to the present, as the curator’s statement for Eder’s current exhibition at Galerie Eigen + Art suggests:

Women in armour, torn linen fabrics, armed with swords, traces of acts of war on their faces. The theme seems to be of a historical one, but is omnipresent: women of war in battle, in combat. Amongst the overflow of catastrophes, natural disasters and war images, emerge female figures as warriors that we repeatedly see, as soldiers, in the form of mothers who protect their children or their villages with weapons in the Middle East, or on another front on Maidan Square, equipped with improvised armour of street signs, gaffer tapes and plastic containers. (Source)

Eder’s exhibition, titled “Those Bloody Colours,” is showing at Eigen + Art in Berlin until May 23rd.  The title of the exhibition refers to a cry of war uttered in Shakespeare’s Henry VI, Part 3: “Let our bloody colours wave!/And either victory, or else a grave!” Offering yet another level of interpretation, Eder’s works remind us of the power of fantasies, as they can cover up (or romanticize) bloody histories and ongoing violences occurring beneath the “colours” of a flag.

Visit Eder’s website to see more of his art. In addition to oil paintings, he also works in watercolour, photography, and sculpture.

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Crystal Wagner’s Colorful Psychedelic Cut Paper Installations

Crystal Wagner - installation

Crystal Wagner - installation

Crystal Wagner - installation

Crystal Wagner - installation

Crystal Wagner‘s immersive installations are attractively textured, instantly eye catching, elegantly dramatic, and undeniably wonderful. She carefully arranges pieces of paper bought from office stores into organic explosions of florescent color. She invites visitors to walk through and navigate her neon universe of oceanic waves, throbbing bubbles, and swollen mountains.

Wagner’s work is not only aesthetically organic, bu so is the very nature of her process. She talks about how each complex piece is created:

Each installation, and each drawing is a different conversation I am having. The gesture is the introduction, the first impression, and everything else tumbles out. (Source)

Wagner uses her time spent in the many National Parks of America as a lot of her inspiration. Aspects of Yellowstone and Joshua Tree National Parks find their way into her work. The scale of her installations do make you feel as if you are standing in front of a gigantic cliff – dwarfed and in awe. But she is also a child of the modern world, living in an urban jungle, and is very familiar with plastics, paper, and concrete. Wagner explains the importance of this dichotomy in her work:

My latest installation titled Urban Kudzu explores ideas related to people and their disconnection from the natural world… In my own experience with the world, I have a deep rooted understanding of what the plastic feels like, of what man made materials and spaces feel like, and tend to perceive the natural world through a very exotic lens. (Source)

Her work reminds us that although nature is wonderfully powerful and can annihilate anything at any given time, the modern world can also be just as destructive. In both situations we are reminded of our smallness and how easily we can loose control of that around us. (Via Sweet Station)

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