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Filmmaker Gorgeously Captures Intricate Paper Marbling Process

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Turkish filmmaker Oguz Uygur has gorgeously captured his parents’ delicate craft of erbu, also known as paper marbling. To create these beautiful patterns, first a tray is filled with water. Next, paint or ink is spilled, dabbed, dripped, sprayed, fanned, and/or pulled across the surface of the water. Sometimes additives and chemicals are applied to the mixture to create various textures. Thin wires are used to pull paint or ink into intricate patterns, with deliberate care taken for each design. Finally, a piece of washi paper is placed onto the water/paint surface with the intent to stain the pattern onto the paper. The paper is then allowed to dry before being used for calligraphy, book covers, and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery.This marbling method was first developed in East and Central Asia, as well as the Islamic world and is currently an important part of Turkish, Tajik, Indian, and other Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Some of the marbled designs and patterns are reminiscent of the woven carpets typically found in similar regions. Uygur’s short film captures amazing detail and depth of field using close-up shots demonstrating the intricate attention paid to this form of aqueous surface design. (via art and fury).

 

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MONICA MENEZ

Monica Menez’s photographs are everything you’d ever want in fashion photographs with the perfect mix of sex ladies, playful themes, and creative ingenuity.

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The Lusciously Detailed Colored Pencil Drawings Of Joe Sinness

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The lush, vibrant colored pencil drawings of Joe Sinness portray screen and stage stars, queer icons, and online erotica submitters, combining them with antique or thrift store items, flowers and jewels to create carefully constructed tableaus. The technical ability of the Minneapolis-based artist is what one immediately notices, and it is only after that the viewer must attempt to make sense of the laboriously drawn scene before them.

Sinness creates each still-life by hand before photographing and then meticulously executing them with Prismacolor pencils.  “I want each still life to have a visual richness or lushness to highlight and celebrate the figures or kitsch objects presented (and I use the term ‘kitsch’ with the utmost seriousness)”.In works like the Shining Indiscretions triptych (seen above), Sinness created a loose mythology which the work is based on, but does not depend upon. Titled from a Tennesse Williams quote (“All good art is an indiscretion.”), Sinness built hundreds of scenes imagining what a queer,flamboyant spirit such as Williams might physically look like, eventually settling on a triptych of shapes formed from gold lamé. The triumph of this triptych is that the viewer most certainly does not need to know this backstory to enjoy the work, because the images are so visually striking and meditative that they speak for themselves. However, they also have a strong conceptual intention and purpose which informs the work for those who wish to dig deeper.

Sinness continues, “I am interested in how objects and people seeking fame become consumable products, a paradox that sees their artistic endeavors pursuing immortality become disposable and commodified. My imagery and subjects are first looted and then loved… In mining these subjects and devotedly recasting them together in shrine-like still lifes, they are given new life in narratives which mirror their subject’s original aspiration and desire for fame and immortality.”

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1000TimesYes

1000_boxCHRISTOPHER R. WEINGARTEN is a Brooklyn-based freelance music journalist whose work regularly appears in the Village Voice, RollingStone.com, Revolver and much more. In 2009 he vowed to review 1,000 new releases over Twitter.At the end of 2009 Weingarten set out to collaborate on a book version of the Twitter reviews with Article.

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New Beautiful/Decay wallets!

"Satellite" by Sentimental Soycheese


"Throw Up" by Skwak

Beautiful/Decay recently teamed up with Poketo to create custom wallets! The first is the  interstellar design “Satellite” by anonymous art collective Sentimental Soycheese, featuring a B/D spaceship in a gradient lit space-scape. Second is “Throw Up” by Skwak, whose main character is a multi-eyed blue behemoth barfing a macrocosmic selection of minute monsters. 

 

The wallet contains 3 slots for credit cards, a bill slot, and a change purse. It’s 8.5″ x 3.75″ open, but folds perfectly to fit in your pocket (4.25″ x 3.75″). All wallets are limited edition and all online orders come with a matching badge/pin too!

 

Sold on our online shop!

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Osman Granda

Osman Granda is a designer and animator working out of Barcelona, Spain. He has some kickass detailed illustrations that are just flat out fun.

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Awesome Video Of The Day:Peripetics

Zeitguised made Peripetics in six acts for the opening exhibition at the Zirkel Gallery. It entails six imaginations of disoriented systems that take a catastrophic turn, including the evolution of educational plant-body-machine models and liquid building materials.

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Miami Project 2013 Highlights

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Kate Clark’s half-human, half-animal sculpture

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Vanessa German’s Doll sculptures

Miami Project, one of the biggest fairs in the Wynwood district this year, celebrates some of the most sought after artists this year. Most importantly though, as Jillian Steinhauer brings to light in her article ‘The Women of Miami Project’, most of the impressive works here were created by women. Consequently,  most of my favorite works in this fair were created by women too!

Here are some of the highlights at the Miami Project art fair:

Brooklyn based artist Kate Clark creates sculptures that are a lifelike fusion of a human and an animal. The surreal object, almost human-sized, investigates which characteristics separate us within the animal kingdom, and more importantly, which ones unite us.

The unexpectedness of the human face on these animals also evokes curiosity. They are obviously reconstructed yet they are not monstrous, they are approachable, natural, calm, innocent, dignified. The facial features are believable and the skin, which is the animal’s skin, has been shaved to reveal porous and oily features that we recognize as our own. The viewer has an intimate relationship with the face and then identifies with the animal, acknowledging the animalistic inheritance within the human condition.

Vanessa German, a multidisciplinary artist [sculptor, photographer, painter, actress, poet] and advocate for the black female experience,  creates these female figures that are made out of plaster, wood, glue, tar and found objects: hair, shells, old jewelry. They each represent aspects of female experience, power, and her cultural heritage.

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