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Ricardo Fumanal’s layered drawings

 

London-based illustrator Ricardo Fumanal creates tight graphite drawings that combine many elements to create an almost collage-like effect. The drawings might have come off as cold and without human touch if it hadn’t been for Fumanal’s skill in capturing the expressions of his subects. And then again, if you get so good at rendering in graphite that people find it hard to see a human touch in the first place, maybe that’s not such a bad thing. See more of the artist’s work after the jump.

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Frank Höhne’s Grungy LSD Drawings

What do you get when you combine the playfulness of a child’s drawing, the grunginess of a zine, the general awesomeness of MS Paint, and perhaps just a drop of LSD? You get the work of Berlin-based illustrator, Frank Höhne. Frank’s drawings are delightfully messy – there are endless stories woven into the varying typefaces, characters, and shapes. Even better – Gestalten just released a book on Frank this month. It was really hard to pick, but we have a few of our favorites from Frank’s endless portfolio after the jump.

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Ben Schumacher

"Head For The Stoic," wood,veneer, jeans, concrete, streamed video loop -"emo blowjob" 2009

"Head For The Stoic," wood,veneer, jeans, concrete, streamed video loop "emo blowjob" 2009

Ben Schumacher creates art in many traditional and non tradition forms, whether it be through drawings or exploring new ways to conceptualize and present art via and about the internet with an ironic sense of humor that could only have been developed by long hours mulling over the way we use and relate to the tools specific to our cyberspace generation. Ahh, the day I’m tired of it is the day I’m dead!

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Vegan Taxidermist’s Beautiful Creations Pose Ethical Questions

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As a child, the vegan taxidermist Nicola Jayne Hebson wandered the Blackburn, England countryside, the sight of dead animals haunting her memory long after she returned home. The indignity of remains left to rot struck a chord in her, and she finally took a pair of mating, deceased frogs home, gently placing them in a frame, forever bound mid-coitus.

The artist, now 23, taught herself taxidermy, using only roadkill and deceased pets. The decision to use any living or once-living creature for the sake of art raises ethical questions, but Hebson hopes that debate over her work will inspire viewers to consider the ethics of the meat industry.

Ultimately, Hebson’s work reads as an emphatic attempt to reanimate a being that no longer exists, and it that sense it does—perhaps unfairly— claim nonhuman remains as an expression of the inherently human will to be remembered after death. But in this case, the work itself is so painstakingly delicate that it feels surprisingly generous; her careful craft isn’t a boastful display of her own ability; instead, it recalls ancient mummifications or ritualistic burial practices.

Her creations exude a life-like pathos uncommon in taxidermy in part because of her paradoxical choice to rely upon fantasy over strict realism, appealing to a more emotionally heightened realm of poetry and make-believe. One rat appears to lay a loved one to rest, and the viewer is seduced into mournfulness, forgetting for a brief moment that both rats are in fact dead. Other, more surreal creatures exist within what we might imagine to be a sort of afterlife; her seven-headed rat quietly recalls the biblical Book of Revelations.

Hebson’s creations are dizzyingly anachronistic, seeming to draw inspiration from anywhere between the Medieval Gothic period to the Victorian age. Unified only in their deaths, her works speak across generations and inspire us to mourn for those we so often forget. (via BUST and VICE)

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Design Month: Wacom Inkling

We can’t talk design without talking about the products that make it all happen. When I first heard of Wacom’s forthcoming Inkling I could barely contain my excitement at the possibilities. It works on an up to A4 size paper, you can draw in layers and importing into your computer seems seamless. Imagine what you could do in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator with this tool? My current Wacom Intuos is a permanent fixture and I can’t imagine working in Adobe Illustrator without it.

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Steven Riddle Featured In B/D Book: 6

Not only does Steven Riddle make bold and eye catching  collage work but he is also one of the featured artists in Beautiful/Decay :Future Perfect book. We can’t ruin all the fun and show you what Steven’s contribution to the book is but you can get your very own copy here at the B/D shop before it sells out!

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Jessica Tremp

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Working out of Melbourne, Australian photographer Jessica Tremp produces some lovely creative pieces. Her technique is rather dusty, as if her work was produced some sixty years ago; complementing her taxidermic subjects and derelict settings. Each piece impresses the viewer with unsettling beauty.

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Fantasy Island: Charles Avery’s Art Tells Us The Story Of An Imaginary Place

Charles Avery - headpiece

Charles Avery - headpieceCharles Avery - sculpture   Charles Avery - headpiece

Charles Avery‘s artistic practice is centered around a fictional island. Everything he creates has some connection to either the history of this place, or specimens and relics that are found there. Since 2004 Avery has been building the story of this place through intricately detailed drawings, sculptures, installations, and texts.

The gateway to the Island is the town of Onomatopoeia – once the stepping off point of the pioneers who first came to the place, turned colonial outpost, turned boom town, bustling metropolis, depression ravaged slum, to regenerated city of culture and tourist destination. (Source)

Avery builds on his own personal history as a starting point to this Island. Born on the Isle of Mull off the West Coast of Scotland, it seems as if he is commenting on the influence the British Monarchy has had over his home country, and also on numerous other countries and islands. His oeuvre is concerned with the progress of a nation – from rags to riches, and back again. The retelling of this folklore is a complex one. His work includes samples of the flora and fauna found there (different types of tree branches and birds), the fashions worn (a lot of different headpieces) and also studies of the local’s behavior. He creates a full anthropological study.

His past projects include “The Island” – concerned with the same place, just with the information organized differently. His attention to detail is so great, he even shows us the type of creature that we would encounter in the Island’s pantheon: a strange hybrid of dogs joined at the head, engaged in battle. Judging from these animals and the frenzied activity he depicts in his studies of the town square, this Island is definitely one I am glad to visit theoretically. (Via HiFructose)

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