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Sculptures That Seem To Extend Infinitely

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Ivan Navarro sculpture8

Artist Ivan Navarro is known for his work with neon and fluorescent lighting.  Using the lights in with a one-way mirror and a regular mirror Navarro’s sculpture to extend endlessly.  They appear to extend on into infinite darkness, adding a weighty metaphorical layer to his artwork.  His work conveys a certain uneasiness with each pieces ambiguous text, which exacerbated by the visual abyss.  “There is a certain amount of fear in my pieces”, he has appropriately said.  “I make spaces in a fictional way to deal with my own psychological anxiety.”

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Fabio Viale’s Marble Sculptures That Look Like Styrofoam

What at first may look like a Styrofoam Mona Lisa is actually incredibly detailed marble work by Italian artist Fabio Viale. Yes you read that right. Marble. Viale does some incredible work to modernize this “old-fashioned” medium, like re-creating Greek Korus torsos and hands covered in tattoos. He is able to transform this heavy, bulky material into creations that seem light and airy, like old beat up tires, popcorn or crumpled paper bags. Viale even went so far as to create a marble motorboat he called Ahgalla, which remarkably he used to navigate the rivers north of Italy. 

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Barry Stone

Barry Stone keeps things simple and precise with geometric abstract collages. Barry also has some video work on his site that’s worth a peak.

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Daniel St. George’s Collage Pop

Daniel St. George is a fine artist living in Brooklyn, NY who has steadily amassed a body of work that is equal parts entertaining, eclectic, and engrossing. St. George  blends elements of collage, printmaking, painting, and drawing  to create clever inverted representations of classic cartoon and pop icons; often placed into dynamic interaction with a found paperback leaf or music score in a personal, methodical context that is all his own.

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Natural Stained Glass Windows: Bing Wright’s Captivating Images Of Sunsets In Mirrors

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New York artist Bing Wright has a clever way of creating something simple and visually striking. For his latest series Broken Mirror/Evening Skies, he has photographed various sunset scenes in shattered mirrors, resulting in beautiful, understated images akin to stained glass windows. The images are full of calming blues, glowing yellows, haunting greys and ferocious reds. In this way Wright really is a photographer painting with light.

While more abstract than some of his earlier works, the composition carries a narrative that enables the viewer to collectively experience the beauty of the sunsets the artist has captured, while facilitating an individual interpretation of the emotion they imbue. We are presented with pictorial images, fragmented and in disrepair – a reminder that everything beautiful is flawed and imperfect. Bing’s signature large format lends these images symmetry and exact composition, giving them a majestic quality. (Source)

Fascinated with the subtlety of changing weather patterns, landscapes and seasons, Wright is known for his poetic photographic series. His past work includes Greyscapes (very bleak, but not bland, views of nature’s tones of grey), Wet Glass (a close up series of droplets and drips on panes of glass), and Windows (a series that narrates the passing of time through the same one window).

Wright has gravitated slowly toward an aesthetic based around reflections, mirrors, silver tones, and foil. He has photographed silver bits on mirrors, mirrors on mirrors, and now simply has captured his surroundings in mirrors. But don’t let the simplicity undersell the elegance of this sunset series. The combination of a violently broken mirror and the tranquility reflected in the shards, has a surprisingly enchanting effect. The charm of these works lie in the juxtaposition between these two worlds.

(Via Design Crush)

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Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert

Patricia Eichert, of Denmark, has a colorful, otherworldly way of photography. It took us a split-second (or more..) to determine if the models above were Christmas mannequins from the 60’s or something else, awesomely contemporary. Her very posed images make for conversation, speaking about youth, beauty, situations and to be human.

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Ellen Jewett Sculpts Flowing Creatures Woven With Tiny Plants, Animals, And Objects

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Ellen Jewett is a Canadian artist who creates flowing sculptural fusions of plants, animals and objects. Among her mystical menagerie is a wild boar with shrubs growing from its mane, foxes with tails sprouting into grass, and a deer whose body resembles a tree-shrouded grove. As singular beasts, Jewett’s creatures are beautiful and dynamic, but look closer and you will see that each one is composed of tinier parts, microcosms of flora, fauna, and objects that weave seamlessly together. These layered components infuse each sculpture with multiple narratives, from celebrations of life and growth, to stories of death, decay, and burden in the form of manmade debris. As Jewett explains:

At first glance my work explores the more modern prosaic concept of nature: a source of serene nostalgia balanced with the more visceral experience of ‘wildness’ as remarkably alien and indifferent. Upon closer inspection of each ‘creature’ the viewer may discover a frieze on which themes as familiar as domestication and as abrasive as domination fall into sharp relief.  (Source)

Jewett makes the sculptures from the inside out, layering materials and utilizing negative space to create hollowed works that flow into the air around them: dense frames unravel into breezy foliage and empty space, creating habitats for fluttering, sculpted birds. The results of these disentangled bodies are creatures that speak their strengths via expressions of lightness, vulnerability, and emotion. Jewett describes this effect:

Over time I find my sculptures are evolving to be of greater emotional presence by using less physical substance: I subtract more and more to increase the negative space. The element of weight, which has always seemed so fundamentally tied to the medium of sculpture, is stripped away and the laws of gravity are no longer in full effect. In reading the stories contained in each piece we are forced to acknowledge their emotional gravity cloaked as it is in the light, the feminine, the fragile, and the unknowable.  (Source)

As part of her creative and flowing artistic practice, Jewett strives to free her work from materials with toxic properties, such as glazes, paints, and finishes. This greatly limits what she can use, but at the same time, incites her imagination and makes her work even more unique. “Where possible I source the natural, the local, the low impact and, always, the authentic,” she writes (Source). Check out Jewett’s website for more beautiful and holistic creations. (Via Lost at E Minor)

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