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Fanny Bostrom

Franny Bostrom

Fanny Bostrom is a Swedish painter and illustrator currently working and residing in New York. I love her literature-appreciating kittens and the rough strokes she uses to paint.

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JESSICA LANGLEY’S LANDSCAPES


In Jessica Langley‘s artwork, the staid landscape genre is revivified through jokes, ha-has, and a reworking of the conceptual apparatus attached to depicting the environment. Langley, a adjunct associate professor of art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, creates new avenues at the margins of “landscape,” by interrogating its space in the human imagination rather than in its physical fact. For instance, in the series Outfitters, Langley explores the troubling conflation of killing nature with loving nature by using the brand names of hunting apparel companies like “Real Tree,” “Open Country,” and “Forever Wild” as edifying doses of black humor. In The Aww and Make CATopia Real (with Ben Kingsley) series, Langley uses kit-kats as a method to defuse all that modernist baggage that accompanies human quests for utopia. But what is CATopia? Extensive networks of imposing cat towers to play on? Free nip for all? It’s unclear, but Langley compels us to consider it worth purrsuing.

Langley is the first artist participating in Skylab Gallery‘s new artist-in-residence program in downtown Columbus, Ohio. Her exhibition at Skylab opens at the end of May 2012. Until then, view more of her work after the jump.

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Monique Schreijer Creates Larger Than Life Wigs That Walk The Fine Line Between Fashion And Art

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Monique Schreijer makes prodigious, multi-colored and wearable wigs. So far, six samples have been designed by the artist in her NYC studio. Each one has a theme and a story leading to dreams and fantasies. Monique Schreijer has created wigs that, aligned together, resemble to a world of tales. Inspired by Sophia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette, braiding her own hair and playing with Barbie dolls when she was a child, she brings something innocent yet symbolic in each wig.

Almost everything including the jewelry is hand made, except for the birds and butterflies. Monique Schreijer uses mixed medias such as of Kanekalon hair, tinted powder, faux pearls, hot glue, feathers, rubber bands, found sticks, wire, glitter, toys, and scraps. She has come up with six wigs over two years. Each wig has a name, a color assigned to it and a detailed theme, narrated on the hair and which is taking most of the space:

‘1.Black – Plague of Marseilles,
2.Red – Queen,
3.Pink – Cotton candy/unicorn,
4.Green – Valley of Cocora,
5.Multicolored/sailboat/dog – California.
6.Blue – Dreamy girl’

Monique Schreijer uses symbols to express what moves her. Ladders to reveal escapism, black skeletons and rats for darkness and evil, flying birds and a flourishing nest for freedom and fertility. Not only are the wigs beautifully crafted, they are a source of creativity and imagination.

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The Ghostly Portraits of Ana De Orbegoso

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Ana de Orbegoso‘s series of photographes, titled The Invisible Wall, is a way of visually depicting personal prejudices.  The photographs are a series of portraits each obscured by a pair of hands, as if the subject were hiding their face.  Underneath the hands, though, a face subtly appears.  Obviously, the series’ title refers to a figurative wall, a social one.  Of these ‘walls’ she says:

“Behind our individual walls we each keep hidden our prejudices, our preconceptions, our highest aspirations. Our individual walls serve to protect us by enabling us to always hold something back, an edge between what is hidden and what is revealed.”

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Jakob Tolstrup’s Humorous and Eccentric Human and Animal Worlds

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Inspired by past experimentation with graffiti culture, Jakob Tolstrup paints eccentric and bizarre characters and worlds. Most of his work combines images from the animal and human worlds and either exposes or makes fun of various aspects of these worlds. He uses humor and straight forward but absurd imagery to subvert ideas associated with the worlds he portrays. “I’m very fascinated by why people make the choices they do in this world, why we live the way we do and all the contradictions I see in the streets all over the world. Often with an alternative reality in mind.” Tolstrup was born in Denmark but currently lives in Berlin.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Sasquatch 2011

A fun animated video created by World Famous to promote the Sasquatch Music Festival Line-Up. Full video after the jump.

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Amber Fawn Keig Draws From Real Life

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Bay Area-based printmaker Amber Fawn Keig‘s works on paper are a collection of colored pencil, gouache and lithographic prints—pulled together under the cohesive investigation of memory. The likenesses scratched out in her careful, stylistic black-and-white prints have the visually-loaded tinge of early 1990’s Americana. Keig usually works with imagery of her friends and family to create these works, although the narratives expressed are somewhat vague and seemingly fictional.

If anything, the litho prints pull the viewer in for a moment of intense technical examination, to look closely at Keig’s tiny, expert strokes, and to take in her careful thematic twists and turns, often embedded in the layered images she pulls together. While the black-and-white works stand well on their own, they’re complimented perfectly by the fluid, intuitive colorwork of her painted and pencil-drawn works. THe moments where the two mediums intersect are the most interesting, but each part of Keig’s current series seems to feed well into the same conceptual vein. While the scale is small, the subject matter is quite curious, and these works carry a kind of welcome, yet weary hominess in their portrayal of contemporary American experience.

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Lisa NIlsson’s Internal Body Landscapes Made out of Paper

Lisa Nilsson’s works renders the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross sections. Her materials are Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time.

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