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Kouhei Nakama’s Mystical Short Film Features Vibrantly Mutating Human Flesh

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Art director Kouhei Nakama has created a computer generated short film that explores the possibilities of a 21st century human chameleon. Within her film titled Diffusion, she portrays a female figure as a generative canvas to investigate the potentiality of human flesh. Using a system that simulates biological processes through mathematical testing, she is able to imitate texturized skin based on patterns and textures that occur in nature. The film begins with what most closely resembles, perhaps, a white and red version of the shapeshifting capabilities of Mystique from X-Men, and transitions into a soft poetic display of a humanoid light show. Through vibrant alterations of rainbow colors and body motions displayed with toned muscles, the film provokes thoughts of almost futuristic yogi sentiments of human aura and energy field displays. The film comes to it’s climax with sculptures of human bodies that seem to be either virtual or somehow physically interconnected as hands appear to have the ability to travel through bodies. The constant shift of color and pattern and eventual bloating and deformation of the figures allow the piece to end on a dramatic, yet satisfying note. Simultaneously alien, human and robotic, Nakama’s display of futuristic metamorphosis is both disturbing and undoubtedly magical. Kouhei Nakama’s short film holds its own as a  mystifying and captivating piece of work; however, it’s true allure lies in it’s ability to display the vast ability (and even further potential) of what CGI programs can accomplish. (via The Creators Project)

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Krzysztof Domaradzki A.K.A Studio KXX

Krzysztof Domaradzki

Krzysztof Domaradzki or Studio KXX for short has a eye popping portfolio full of illustrations and designs. Visit his site yourself for a visual feast.

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Amanda Nedham’s Tension Of History

Primarily concerned with the various taxonomic functions of history, Amanda Nedham’s works on paper exhibit a technical proficiency and enamoured exploration of natural history’s complex and overlapping structures. Through a process of abstraction based on the collaging of drawings, largely from television and internet sources, she attempts to focus on those moments that create tension as they challenge the governing voice of history.

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Jonathan Zawada’s ‘Over Time’ Series

The Over Time series by Jonathan Zawada depicts landscape topographies in bright colours, evoking other fantastical worlds. However, the work was actually derived from graph data of earthly landscapes, which Zawada modelled in 3D to create this beautiful work. Each piece was displayed with the graph data nearby, as seen in the last image showcased here. Absolutely stunning.

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Sipho Mabona Transforms Paper And Sugar Into Wondrous Stained Glass Sculptures

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

Sipho Mabona reinvents traditional origami practices. In a series called vectorgraphics he creates forms where the paper is kept flat. Both aesthetically and spiritually it recalls stained glass windows and resembles colorful panes you might see in a new age cathedral. He furthers the conversation by mixing the pigment with sugar water and achieves a result that improves upon the medium transforming it into something else. There’s hesitation to say ‘new age’ but it does embrace qualities beyond this world.

Mabona started working with paper at a young age making traditional airplane designs. When he was a teenager he turned to origami and has since engaged in many different projects using the material. Besides graphically inspired work and traditional origami figures he has made a life size elephant. All white and made out of folded paper it is a feast for the eyes. His origami has been used to tell the Asics sneaker story. In a short entitled “Origami: in the Pursuit of Perfecton” it traces the company’s history through Mabona’s models.

Origami is the traditional art of making sculptures out of paper without glue, tape or staples. It has three distinct origins dating back to the 16th century. In China, folded paper was burned during funerals as currency for the deceased into the next world. In Japan, the first reference appeared in a short poem where a paper butterfly design was mentioned at a Shinto wedding and in Europe napkin folding became popular with 17th century nobility eventually replacing it with porcelain.   (via designboom)

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NSFW Barbie

Alex Sandwell Kliszynski Photography

Alex Kliszynski shows us what happens if you play with Barbies when you’re young.

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Bratislav Milenkovic’s Typographic Illustrations

Serbian designer Bratislav Milenkovic’s imagery sits at the intersection of typography and illustration usually combining the two to create cleaver and playful images. Morre Typography fun after the jump.

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Dara Scully’s Dark And Mythic Photography Of Young Girls Haunts The Imagination

Dara Scully - Photography Dara Scully - Photography Dara Scully - Photography Dara Scully - Photography

Dara Scully is a Spanish writer and photographer who captures dark, poetic scenes verging on fairy tale and myth. Nude figures inhabit the faded forests. Esoteric rituals transpire on quiet leaf beds. Death is present in the form of insects, prone bodies, and bleeding wounds, and rebirth occurs as birds escape their abandoned cages. As beautiful and graceful as Scully’s images is her creative biography, which reveals her sylvan, literary essence:

“Forest creature, winter girl. I like birches and aspen leaves. In my other life, I was a white deer, a fox, or a swallow. I’ve never flown. I drink milk tea and my favorite word is chrysalis. My heart belongs to Chopin and my body to the horses, but I’ve never ridden any. I read Jaeggy, Nabokov, Duras, and Müller. I read because it saves me. […] If I have to choose a sound, I’d say: the wind shaking the branches of the trees. Or rain. I always wear dresses and man shoes. I [have] written since I was thirteen. I’m afraid of moths. I have six moles in my pale chest.” (Source)

The power of conceptual photographers like Scully lies in the ability to tell stories in a single frame. Just as she encapsulates an entire sensorial experience in the above paragraph, each photo is a compressed narrative overflowing with hidden meaning and an emotional presence—the innocence of youth, the pain of growing, the sorrow of death. Blending reality with fiction, Scully employs subtly powerful symbols—such as the dead birds—to speak their meaning. Deeply subjective, her ambiguous scenes allow the viewer to instill their own significance.

Visit Scully’s website, blog, Instagram, and Facebook page to view more. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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