Get Social:

Beautiful Fordite Stones Made With Layered Paint From Old Car Factories

fordite-1Image via Talyer Jewelryfordite-2Image via m e sweeney  fordite-41Image via Forditefordite-31image via Nebbie

Years ago, the American automotive industry was an unparalleled success not only in productivity, but also in the quality of their beautiful car designs. Unbeknownst to these automotive designers, they were also creating something beautiful that would last long after the processes they pioneered went extinct. Fordite (or Motor Agate, or Detroit Agate) as it has become known, was created by the process of hand-spraying cars with enamel-paint. A byproduct of the process, paint slag called “rough” was baked in the ovens, which hardened the automotive paint, creating layered slabs which crafty autoworkers realized could easily be polished, much like the naturally occurring agates they so resembled. Since this process has long been , these remaining stones have found a particular following, as they can never be created again.

Johnny Strategy, who documented much of the story for Colossal, writes, “Old car factories had a harmful impact on the environment, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, land and water. But it wasn’t all ugly. Oddly enough, one of the by-products of car production was Fordite, also known as Detroit agate. The colorful layered objects take their name from agate stones for their visual resemblance. But instead of forming from microscopically crystallized silica over millions of years, Fordite was formed from layers of paint over several tens of years. Back in the day, old automobile paint would drip onto the metal racks that transported cars through the paint shop and into the oven. The paint was hardened to a rock-like state thanks to high heats from the baking process. As the urban legend goes, plant workers would take pieces home in their lunch pails as a souvenir for their wife or kids.” (via mymodernmet,, colossal)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

New Beautiful/Decay Book Release- The Seven Deadly Sins

Beautiful/Decay is pleased to release Book 9: The Seven Deadly Sins!

Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Pride, and Envy have been explored—and challenged—for centuries by artists, scholars, and writers. In this issue of Beautiful/Decay, you’ll find artists who explore these themes through a contemporary lens, either by explicitly calling out those deemed guilty of committing one of the Seven Deadly Sins, or by turning the sweeping notion of sin right on its head.

James Gobel tackles Pride through felt portraits of colorfully clad, sexually charged, plus-size bears, and continuing the exploration of Lust, we have the raw and lascivious Polaroids of Jeremy Kost. View Tom Littleson’s bloody portraiture drawings and their relationship with Wrath. See how cover artists Tim Noble & Sue Webster’s adept use of personified garbage channels Gluttony. Libby Black’s paint-and-paper sculptures replicate Envy-inducing luxury brand goods, while paintings and drawings from Brendan Danielsson address the social and physical epidemic of Sloth. Finally, Greed lies at the center of Ghost of a Dream’s hypnotic sculptural art and immersive installations. We’ve also invited international artists, illustrators, and designers to create original pieces for our Project Pages based on all seven sins.

Other featured artists: Carolyn Janssen, Okay Mountain, Colette Robbins, Cleon Peterson, Micah Ganske, Zoe Charlton, Penelope Gottlieb, Paul Mullins, Keith Puccinelli, Travis Somerville, Kara Maria, Aideen Barry, Travis Collinson, Geoffrey Chasedy, John Knuth.

Each copy of Beautiful/Decay: The Seven Deadly Sins comes blind packed with either a zine by Terence Hannum or Heather Benjamin or a limited edition silk screen print by Paul Nudd!


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Peter Kaaden Brings A Raw And Mischievous Edge Into Alt-Fashion Photography

Peter Kaaden - Photography

Guillaume Airiaud headpiece, DSTM dress (VICE).

Peter Kaaden - Photography

Guillaume Airiaud mask, American Apparel leggings (VICE).

Peter Kaaden - Photography

Rein Vollenga headpiece, DSTM dress and belt (VICE).

Peter Kaaden - Photography

Schwarzer Reiter mask, Fleet Ilya bra, Monki underpants (VICE).

Based in Berlin, Peter Kaaden is a photographer who brings a raw, playful, and oft-erotic edge into the world of alt-fashion photography. The images shown here — the majority of which were shot for VICE and Oyster magazines — feature models provocatively bedecked in latex and bizarre headpieces. Whether within the studio or outside at night, Kaaden’s work is sharp, candid, and unapologetic, buzzing with an attitude and youthful “grit” that deviates from the conventional standards of commercial fashion photography. Instead of acting as passive recipients of the camera’s gaze, Kaaden’s subjects engage with it in a rough-yet-refined manner, expressing confidence and sensuality in imaginative ways.

If you visit Kaaden’s Tumblr, you will notice that his work extends beyond just fashion photography (in the traditional sense); there are images of nudes, erotic and/or strange still lifes, people engaged in amusingly raunchy night-time activities, and more. In an interview with Neon Black Fashion Magazine, Kaaden described his work as “a rough and honest documental view of my life and a view on today’s wasted lovely youth” (Source). Indeed, many of his images have an air of spontaneity and honesty — a style that is carried into his editorial work. In an industry that is often accused of quelling personal creativity for the sake of commercial interests, Kaaden has done a great job infusing the conventions of fashion photography with mischief and his perspectives on youth culture.

Visit Kaaden’s website and blog for a wide range of his work, and check out the editorials for VICE and Oyster, as well as one for C-Heads Magazine.

Currently Trending

Turn Yourself into a Na’Vi Avatar!

Picture 7

Nerd Alert! Were you one of the many Avatar fans that found themselves depressed, even suicidal when you found yourself unable to visit the utopian alien Planet Pandora? Well, now you can become one of the Na’Vi thanks to The Photo Lab, an Australian graphic designer offering fantasy photoshop services. For a mere $18 bucks, you can become a toruk makto and zip around the planet bonded to the back of the Great Leonopteryx yourself!

Currently Trending

“Serious Design”: Matija Erceg’s Humorously Disgusting Hybrids Of Raw Food And Everyday Objects

Matija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - DesignMatija Erceg - Design

Stumble onto Matija Erceg’s Instagram account — inconspicuously named @seriousdesign — and find yourself immersed in a gallery of delight and disgust. Erceg, a Vancouver-based web and graphic designer, combines images of food — usually raw meat — with everyday objects. Among his hilariously gross “inventions” are shrimp earbuds, pizza irons, ground pork trolls, and sausage vibrators (the latter design taking the “food porn” trend to an entirely new level). The idea emerged when Erceg came across a photoshopped image of sandals with cooked beef as soles; while contemplating the absurd experience of putting them on, Erceg decided he wanted to try and evoke similar reactions among people, discovering as he went that food “lends itself nicely to being a part of an inanimate object” — hence how easily a chicken breast can be made to look like an oven mitt.

In addition to making people laugh and cringe, Erceg’s designs are experiments in context. If food is presented neatly — and properly cooked — on a plate, it is seen as acceptable and appealing; but, as Erceg observes, when the same food makes contact with “your skin (hands, feet, ears, face, etc.), [it] becomes gross or weird” — shrimp, while often considered a delicacy, does not belong inside the ear canal. There are several possible reasons for this discomfort, whether it’s in regards to phobias surrounding the (potential) toxicity of raw meat, or just the idea of dead, cold flesh lying around the house as a useable object. Erceg, however, pushes it further, commenting on how his designs confront us with the unglamorous realities of modern food production: “We admire food, but typically only when we don’t need to get too close to it — [the] raw texture, pre-cooked form, farming, and slaughtering.” His designs remind us of how alienated we are from the foods we eat; food — like sunglasses, housewares, and sex toys — has become grossly commodified.

When I asked Erceg where he aims to take his project next, he said he would like to collaborate with a fake food artist and create real-life versions of his designs. Follow Erceg on Instagram and see what edible objects he dreams up next. But be warned — you may not look at packaged chicken breasts or slabs of beef the same way again.

Currently Trending

Tilman Faelker


Tillman Faelker is an illustrator from Germany.

Currently Trending

Jennifer Krantz Paints Chaos

jennifer Krantz

We haven’t posted any abstract paintings in a while so I thought post some work by Rockford Illinois painter Jennifer Krantz. These paintings have everything in them from fire crackers to spray paint to sequins. Although some of the work reminds of Fiona Rae I think Jennifer gets a pass for creating such fun chaos.

Currently Trending

Cubist Inspired Street Art

Ruben Sanchez street art7 Ruben Sanchez street art6

Ruben Sanchez street art5

Spain based street artist Ruben Sanchez has a peculiar artistic style.  His work can be found internationally (his latest, the top photograph, created in Dubai).  However, his home of Spain can be found in his artwork anywhere its painted.  Influences such as Picasso’s Cubism or Miro’s Surrealism are clear in his spray painted mural.  He goes on to say of the influences that can be found in his work:

“If you dissect any of my artworks in an operating room you will find graphic design, tribal art, graffiti, cubism, skateboard culture, 90’s and 80’s music, flamenco, social situations and a kaleidoscope among others.”

Currently Trending