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Milana Braslavsky

I know I may be partial to artists who went to the same  art school as me (Maryland Institute College Of Art) but Milana Braslavsky’s photographs are downright quirky, playful, funny, and most importantly Beautiful. For some reason all the figures in her photos remind me of quirky art school girls with thick rimmed glasses who listen to Buddy Holly albums on vinyl.

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HUH. ONE Zine

HUH. ONE Zine

HUH. ONE is a black and white zine released by HUH Magazine of an edition of one hundred. I have to say the photography featured in this zine is really awesome. Photographers include Chad Moore, Dana Goldstein, Gavin Watson, Jerry Hsu, Jonnie Craig, Kathy Lo, Lele Saveri, Patrick Griffin, Pawel Jaszczuk, Peter Sutherland, Sean Vegezzi, Bea Fremderman, Paul Herbst, Seth Fluker, Patrick Tsai and Young Kyu Yoo. Head over to their website to get a limited copy.

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Eric Valli’s Honey Hunters

High in the Himalayan foothills, fearless Gurung men risk their lives to harvest the massive nests of the worlds largest honeybee. Photographer Eric Valli tagged along to document one of the most dangers jobs that is just business as usual to the people who live in the Himalayas. (via)

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New Work by Jan Kalwejt

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Jan Kalwejt, who contributed the amazing “Lung Music” shirt has a bunch of new works up on his site. Check ’em out!

 

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Next Day Flyers Presents: Aysha Banos

20 year old photographer Aysha Banos creates photographs based upon personal experiences; a recreation of metaphoric events or incidents that are visual memories from the past and present.

For quality brochure printing, check out Next Day Flyers, the provider of this post.

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NICHOLAS KAHN & RICHARD SELESNICK AT Kopeikin Gallery

collaborative duo Nicholas Kahn and Richard Selesnick‘s Mars: Adrift on the Hourglass Sea exhibition opens on Saturday, May 21st at Kopeikin Gallery. Kahn & Selesnick work lies at the intersection of historical fact, apocalyptic future and nerdy museology. Melding childlike playfulness with adult obsession, they create faux-historical narratives realized as photography, sculpture, and installation. “Adrift on the Hourglass Sea” is set on the planet Mars where the artists present a dark and powerful visage of a collapsed civilization on the red planet. Using photo-mosaics of the Martian landscape taken by NASA space rovers (they were recipients of a NASA commission to create work about Mars) and combining them with their own photographs of deserts in Nevada and Utah, the artists present their distinctive brand of sci-fi mysticism.

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Adam Miller’s Contemporary Mythological Paintings

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With his paintings, Adam Miller recontextualizes baroque and Hellenistic style elements by placing them within a modern futuristic landscape. Miller implements mythological, ecological, and humanistic themes in order to address ideas of technology and progress and “the struggle to find meaning in a world poised between expansion and decay.” His dreamy and angelic compositions reflect contemporary concerns with a classic and realist style. Imagery that might at first appear dated and inaccessible becomes relatable and modern upon closer inspection.

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Alison Moritsugu Paints Forested Scenes On Logs That Romanticize And Lament Nature

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Alison Moritsugu is an artist based in Beacon, NY, who paints pieces of fallen trees with scenes of idealized nature. Her works recall the landscape paintings of the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly those of Albert Bierstadt and Frederic Edwin Church. Following the contours of the logs, she revisions their origins as trees, painting deep forests, still lakes, mountain waterfalls, and autumnal skies. The log paintings serve a dual function: first, to acknowledge and meditate on the beauty of nature, much like the artists of the Hudson River School did; second, to contrast this romanticism with the signs of its destruction—the dead wood on which the scenes appear.

“My work reveals how idealized images of the land shape our concept of the natural world—in essence, how our experiences are mediated by the mechanisms of art and culture,” Moritsugu writes in her artist’s statement (Source). Throughout history, artists have appropriated and interpreted nature, turning lush imagery into cultural symbols of peace, exploration, sublimity, and abundance. These were the types of stories that fostered an idea that nature was somehow separate from us, a land of fantasy that eventually grew to be exploited. Today, as Moritsugu points out, “photoshopped images of verdant forests and unspoiled beaches invite us to vacation and sightsee, providing a false sense of assurance that the wilderness will always exist” (Source). By producing a conflict between the serene imagery and the dead wood, Moritsugu faces us with our roles in the environment’s uncertain future.

Visit Moritsugu’s website to view more. (Via Design Faves)

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