Get Social:

Dimitri Tsykalov Creates Weapons Out of Raw Meat

Russian Artist Dimitri Tsykalov’s incredible Meat series is equally frightening and beautiful. Creating weapons, body armor, and other accessories of war and violence out of raw flesh, Tsykalov’s powerful photos put death front and center.

For Meat Tsykalov used over 150 kilos of fresh meat. He had to work rapidly because the meat had to be as fresh as possible in order to have optimal colour and texture. He sculpted his “meat weapons” at night and decorated his models with them in the morning.

The concept: ‘It is flesh holding meat to shoot flesh’. He brings rifles to life using dead meat, wielded by a human being, live flesh, that will, eventually, die, too. The idea of transience and mortality, that was already present in Skulls, is continued here. Tsykalov made Meat in the aftermath of the war in Iraq, but the series is not a reaction to that war as such. It is a reflection on man’s violence in general, devoid of melodrama and with a sense of humour. But it is not the humour that will strike the spectator most. The life-size prints of naked people holding ‘meat weapons’ make an aggressive first impression. It is only after a while that the poetry, aestheticism and even eroticism become visible. The photos are frontal and highly stylized, even though they may look raw: the clair-obscur lighting, the colour nuances and the texture of the meat and skin, a drop of blood slowly meandering down the body … the images make a lifelike impression, almost as if we can touch the bodies. Still, the uncanny feeling they arouse, is in the mind of the beholder, rather than in the images themselves. -Tamara Berghmans

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Pantone Colors You Can Eat!

Pantone colors seem to be all the rage these days with licensing deals being made for everything from messenger bags to stationary. However this collection of images designed by French food designer Emilie de Griottes takes the cake (or tart!). Commissioned by culinary magazine Fricote, Griottes created tasty tarts based around the gorgeous colors that creatives depend on to make all sorts of design magic happen. We’re hoping that with the popularity of this photo spread we’ll soon be able to order a Pantone 7507C tart with extra banana from your favorite dessert spot. (via junk culture)

 

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Kirsten Hassenfeld’s Fragile, Ethereal Paper Gems

Kirsten Hassenfeld Kirsten Hassenfeld Kirsten Hassenfeld

Massive, glowing webs of geometric gems climb the walls, successfully controlling the behavior of early afternoon light—while soaking the empty surfaces of the space with gentle washes of color. It’s only upon close inspection that the pieces reveal themselves to be painstakingly handcrafted, light-as-a-feather paper sculptures by Brooklyn-based artist Kirsten Hassenfeld. She applies her sharp paper craft skill set to creating fanciful, (if not slightly frivolous) site-specific works that command presence, but in reality are quite ephemeral. A nice study of pure form, movement and spatial composition.

Currently Trending

Dimitri Tsykalov

dimitri_tsykalov_02

I am in love with Dimitri Tsykalov’s series of fruit and veggie skulls. So intricately carved into accurate representations! He seems to take an interest in unorthodox sculpture materials… as he used meat to create war weapons as a commentary on the exposed soldier inside a butchering.

Currently Trending

Self-Folding Paper Robot Assembles Itself In Less Than 4 Minutes And Even Walks Away

Sam-Felton-Design-1 Sam-Felton-Design-2 Sam-Felton-Design-3 Sam-Felton-Design-4

US-based team of scientists has built a robot that folds itself into an origami-inspired shape starting from a flat sheet. The assemblage of such robot doesn’t require any human intervention. It is made from a polymer material which shrinks when heated, also has electronics and motors attached to it. When the heating elements affect the hinges made in paper, the robot starts transforming into a crab-like machine. The whole process takes about 4 minutes before the robot can start walking.

The team behind the project said their inspiration came from the complex 3-D shapes in origami: like in the Japanese paper art, various three-dimensional shapes are constructed from a single sheet of paper. This robot takes origami a step further. According to the developer team, such self-assembling robots can be greatly employed in construction or rescue works.

“[They could be delivered] through a confined passageway, such as a collapsed building, after which they would assemble into their final form autonomously,” states Marc Lavine, senior editor at Science.

Robot‘s small size makes is what makes it very useful because of the easy transportation and storage. Apart from search-and-rescue missions, a more advanced version of the robot could be easily used construction works, especially in places that are hard to reach. The whole project is said to cost $11,000 but with the initial designs in place, the mass-production robots should cost around $100 each. (via NPR)

Watch a short video about the project after the jump.

Currently Trending

55% Off All B/D Back Issues- One Week Left!

books_on_sale-565x745In honor of Spring, Beautiful/Decay is offering back issues at over 55% off the cover price! We have slashed ‘em down to the lucky price of just $3. Who wants to scrub floors or clear out a dusty garage for “Spring Cleaning” anyways? We suggest you buy some of your favorite B/D back issues, curl up on a porch swing, and savor the feeling of getting a great deal instead. Buy B/D Back Issues here!

This sale ends April 1st and 3 back issues have already sold out so get your copies now!

Currently Trending

Photos of Bedouin Communities Living Amidst Second World War Minefields

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Greg Funnell’s interview with Photographer Andrew Youngson.

Andrew Youngson’s series, The Devil’s Garden, documents Bedouin communities living amidst Second World War minefields in Egypt’s Western Desert. It is estimated that approximately 17 million unexploded anti-personnel and anti-tank mines; artillery shells; bombs dropped by aircraft and machine gun, small arms and mortar rounds remain beneath the sand.

The Western Desert is an area rich in natural resources but whereas areas allocated for luxury beach resorts and Petroleum Company compounds have been cleared of unexploded ordnance, Bedouin land has not benefited from such programmes. Official records of incidents involving UXO have not been kept until recently but it is believed thousands of Bedouin have been killed or injured since the end of the Second World War.

Youngson is based in London and his new book, Aida, will be published by Black Box Press in July 2012.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day- Woodkid

Wow the cinematography, costumes, animals, and effects in Woodkid’s Iron video is epic! Watch the full video after the jump!

Currently Trending