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Japanese Designer Fangophilia Molds Silver Into Edgy, Armor-Like Accessories

Fangophilia - FashionFangophilia - Fashion Fangophilia - FashionFangophilia - Fashion

Japanese designer Fangophilia (Taro Hanabusa) creates edgy silver accessories made from molds of isolated body parts: teeth, ears, cheeks, kneecaps, fingers, and more. Some of his more frequent designs consist of custom-fit fangs and claw-like finger extensions, but his oeuvre also consists of gauntlets and face-plates redolent of medieval armor. Trained in dentistry and fascinated by body modifications, Hanabusa became curious about what would happen if dental molds were used to alter the appearance of the body, and in June 2012 he started his own brand, Fangophilia.

Each silver accessory is molded to an individual’s form. While ears and knees might generally look similar, all have their own anatomical deviations, making Hanabusa’s creations as unique as the bodies they adorn. In a fascinating interview with Tokyo Fashion, Hanabusa discusses the effect of working so closely with his clients and their unique bodies, saying it makes him feel “connected with [his] customers,” more so “than those who only sell their items only through shops.” In this way, he is very much like a tattoo artist or a piercer, consulting his clients directly in the achievement of their desired look.

The aesthetic impact of Fangophilia’s work is dark and powerful. It’s alternative fashion with a vampiric edge. And even though Hanabusa is no longer a dentist, there is something intriguingly “clinical” or “surgical” about his designs: sharp metal is placed in intimate proximity with the skin, creating an effect that wavers between cold sterility and the shining beauty of silver. Furthermore, as the name “Fangophilia” suggests, there is an element of fetish in his work; by accessorizing (or armoring) a specific detail on the body, you bring attention and erotic curiosity to it. Plates of metal on the cheeks, for example, accentuate the sensual curve of a jawline. This allure is not to be taken lightly, however, for like suits of armor, Hanabusa’s designs exude both beauty and tremendous strength.

Fangophilia was in Los Angeles last November, so follow his Facebook page to keep up with his latest work and see where he tours next. His website can be found here. Tokyo Fashion’s article is another great resource, and it provides an exclusive, behind-the-scenes video showing Hanabusa’s shoot for his first lookbook, the photos from which are displayed on this page. (Via Tokyo Fashion)

Credits: Photographer: KIRA. Models: Hirari Ikeda, Hidemi Tsukata, Sioux, Shunsuke Okabe, Machiko.

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A London Children’s Hospital Covered In Bold Murals By Artists And Designers Brings Cheer To Young Patients

Ward 7D by Morag Myerscough

Ward 7D by Morag Myerscough

Ward 7D by Morag Myerscough

Ward 7D by Morag Myerscough

Ward 7F by Donna Wilson

Ward 7F by Donna Wilson

Doran, Bedside Views

Ella Doran, Bedside Views

Hospitals often appear sterile and uninviting, especially when you’re a kid. The Royal London Children’s Hospital officially opened in March 2012, and over the past two years they’ve worked with the organization Vital Arts to liven up the walls with playful art. Artists and designers were commissioned to paint five different wards of the hospital using bright colors, bold shapes, 3D design. Each creative has their own speciality and style, and the list of particpants includes: textile artist Donna Wilson; wooden toy designers Miller Goodman; product designer Tord Boontje; children’s author, illustrator, and rug designer Chris Haughton; and surface and textile designer Ella Doran.

The hospital becomes infinitely more inviting with these artists’ additions. Some of the highlights include Haughton and Miller Goodman’s handiwork. Haughton is the author of the books Shh! We Have a Plan and Oh, No George!, and he used his delightful characters to adorn the walls. Also, a selection of his framed rugs were hung up and created more warmth and coziness. Miller Goodman constructed wooden designs that physically stand out on the walls. This was inspired by their bag of 74 different-shaped wooden toy pieces, and you see how the whole animals are made up with smaller, fractured parts. (Via designboom)

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Human Organs Created Out Of Flora

Human Organs

Human Organs sculpture11

Human Organs sculpture

 

Bristol artist Camila Carlow creates these lovely renderings of human organs by foraging for wild plants, weeds, and the occasional animal part and then sculpting and arranging these various bits of flora. Her series, entitled “Eye ‘Heart’ Spleen,” recontextualizes images of organs such as a heart, lungs, stomach, uterus, liver, and testicles, demonstrating the reflection of internal biological structures with external natural structures. From Carlow’s site, “This work invites the viewer to regard our vital structures as beautiful living organisms, and to contemplate the miraculous work taking place inside our bodies, even in this very moment.” You can order prints and keep up with this particular project’s developments via its Facebook page. (via unknown editors)

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Ad Hoc Vox presents Through Biography

 

 

Wednesday June 10, 6:30 PM

The Drawing Center

35 Wooster St, New York, NY 10013

 

Ad Hoc Vox and The Drawing Center are pleased to invite you to Through Biography, a panel discussion that will take place at The Drawing Center on Wednesday, June 10th at 6:30 p.m.

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50% Off Apparel Sale Ends Tonight At Midnight!

This is your last chance to save cash and add a few B/D shirts to your wardrobe. Our massive 50% off apparel and headwear sale ends Tonight at midnight! Get every single shirt we have on our shop for 50% off. You can even save 50% off items that are already on sale with some shirts costing only $5.00! Just enter discount code: MAYSHIRTSALE and let the savings pour in!

Sale Ends: Wednesday May 25th 2011 At Midnight

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Studio Visit: Ryan Schneider

I headed over to Brooklyn to check out what Ryan Schneider had cooking after not seeing his work for a year.  He was painting when I got there; mixing a fleshly color on the big glass palette in the center of the room.  Canvases lined the walls, some were finished and some were in progress.  He paints all the nouns: people, places and things; and does so in a thoughtful way that reflects life.  Still lifes which range from bathtubs to bookshelves, and landscapes which seem to suggest an alternate, more romantic reality.

The paintings are populated with figures, and he had interesting things to say about figure painting.  In person, the paintings are very obviously physical.  They combine juicy paint, carved-in-words, bold colors, and a funky sense of space.  This makes for paintings which flip between pattern and illusion.  His new paintings were confident, and maybe even more colorful and spatially complex than his previous work.  Schneider recently left Priska C Juschka, his gallery of several years.  Besides being a painter, Schneider is also a curator and has organized high profile group shows in locations near and far, and he was at it again.  He is behind a show which just opened in Austin, at Champion Contemporary, called “Wild Beasts.”   He included a group of artists who share a love of color and admiration for Matisse and the French Fauves.  Read some of our discussion after the jump.

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Luke O’Sullivan

foundation2 Luke O’Sullivan’s 3D work is like walking straight into a pop up book. He uses screenprint on wood to create some amazing 3D landscapes.

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Amy Sarkisian’s Underwear wearing Spheres & Ikea Wood Inlay

Off beat humor is a running theme throughout the sculptures and drawings of Los Angeles artist Amy Sarkisian. In one piece a  giant geometric sphere is wearing an equally massive pair of underwear. In another series cheap Ikea furniture is embellished with lavish patterning using inexpensive adhesive vinyl to replicate high end wood inlay.  Regardless of image or material, comedy weaves its way in and out of Sarkisian’s imagery both through choice of material and concept.

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