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Andrew Hayes Creates Powerful Minimalist Sculptures From Books

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Tucson boy Andrew Hayes creates industrial sculptures from books. His work, reminiscent of minimalist pieces from the 1960s and 1970s, uses seemingly simple manipulations to create beautiful compositions employing the use of color blocking and the glorification of materiality.

Drawing inspiration from the American desert landscape in his earlier works, Hayes created the foundation of his style through fabricating steel. After his studies, Hayes worked as an industrial welder. While bouncing between jobs, he found himself as a Core Fellow at the Penland School of Crafts in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Bakersville, North Carolina. During this time, Hayes began to explore with various materials and forms, eventually finding his way to the book. He states,

“The book is a seductive object to hold and smell and run your fingers through. I am drawn to books for many reasons; however, the content of the book does not enter my work. The pages allow me to achieve a form, surface, and texture that are appealing to me. The book as an object is full of fact and story. I take my sensory appreciation for the book as a material and employ the use of metal to create a new form, and hopefully a new story.”

Sticking true to the celebration of form and material, Hayes work is truly striking and exudes a sort of power associated with fabrication. However, the introduction of the book allows a softness that is not only a fun play on an aesthetic staple, but also hints at a element of elusiveness — as he does not use the contents of the books — his work invites an aspect of imagination for the viewer. (via iGNANT)

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Subscribe To Beautiful/Decay Before Book 8 Ships and get a Free Limited Edition Zine!

Beautiful/Decay is honoring its DIY zine roots by teaming up with 5 artists from around the country to bring you their limited edition zines. Mailed exclusively to Beautiful/Decay subscribers, each copy of Beautiful/Decay Book:8 will come complete with

it’s very own zine. Each B/D subscriber will receive a different zine blind packed into their issue. These zines are not available in stores, only B/D subscribers will receive them. Subscribe today to make sure you get your hands on one of these exclusive zines. Read about the talented zine makers after the jump and click on the subscribe link to reserve your copy of Beautiful/Decay Book:8 with the limited edition zine today!

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Surreal And Unnerving Photo Manipulations Question The Nature Of Reality

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For his surreal photo manipulations, the Buenos Aires-based digital artist Martin De Pasquale contorts his own body to imbue the mundane rituals of daily life with a sense of humor that sometimes veers into the realm of terror. With the wonderfully oxymoronic title “Impossible Photography,” De Pasquale’s work stretches the medium to its limit, boldly questioning our assumption that the photographic object necessarily reflects reality. Though indeed impossible, the strange and comical mishaps— and horrors— of the work speak to very real existential anxieties.

Here, the human body emerges as mechanical, much like the the camera itself. Like the gears of an advanced automaton, heads and faces are replaced with ease, and the treat of mortality is abated with ever-renewed body parts. In some ways, the impossible photographs recall the paradox of the Ship of Theseus, a thought experiment which asks if a ship remains essentially the same after each of its parts are replaced. Here, the ship becomes a human being; in the daily grind of life, our protagonist is continually deconstructed and reassembled. Does he become generic, or does he hold fast to his identity?

In so questioning the individual, De Pasquale’s imaginative images challenge the notion of replication, which in turn examines the very nature of the photograph. Seen here many times over, the self is given over to a mysterious—and frightening— sort of duplication, giving rise to unnatural yet indistinguishable bodies that are ultimately mere simulacrums of the original. Take a look. (via Demilked)

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Amanda McCavour’s Hanging Thread Illustrations Created From Soluble Fabric

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Amanda McCavour creates delicate and intricate thread illustration-sculptures by sewing into a fabric that dissolves in water. This method allows her to build a threaded structure that stays in place once the fabric dissolves. The result is embroidery that appears fragile, on the verge of unraveling. She recreates domestic scenery, like that of chairs, side tables, electric sockets, in addition to other figures such as hands, a garden, and a steam pump. The effect of this work is ephemeral and whimsical.
From her artist statement, “I am interested in the vulnerability of thread, its ability to unravel, and its strength when it is sewn together.  I am interested in the connections between process and materials and the way that they relate to images and spaces.  Tracing actions and environments through a process of repetition, translation and dissolving, I hope to trace absence.  My work is a process of making as a way of tracing and preserving things that are gone, or slowly falling apart.”  (via slow art day)

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Sculptor Carol Milne Knits With Glass

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Carol Milne fires up small structural sculptures of knitting made entirely of glass. Though there’s no mistake that this is no ordinary yarn — unless it’s the crystalline yarn of some mystical other plane — it’s still incredible to see the amount of detail and the illusion of malleability.

The technique Milne uses involves wax, refractory molds, molten glass (at a startling 1,400 to 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit), and a steady hand; once the initial process is done, Milne has to carefully free her work of art from its mold, piece by piece.

The sculptures are at once whimsical and delicate, poised as though mid-conversation during a most magical knitting club session. Her sculptures, on average never exceeding 12 inches, are also flavored heavily with surrealism; one sculpture pays homage to M.C. Escher who, no doubt, would have appreciated her clean, understated lines.

There are, too, some sociological undertones; Milne says in an artist’s statement:

“I see my knitted work as metaphor for social structure. Individual strands are weak and brittle on their own, but deceptively strong when bound together.” (via This Is Colossal)

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Matthew Harlan

Gorgeous typography, beautiful color schemes, and hard edged geometric patterns can be found in the work of Matthew Harlan.

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An Entire Amusement Park Packed Into A 13 Foot Cube

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The Glue Society‘s newest project for Sculpture by the Sea, Aarhus is an amusent park, or rather, was an amusement park.  James Dive of the group gathered an entire demolished amusement park and compacted it into one 13 foot cube.  Pieces of rides and remnants of prizes can easily be seen in the mass.  The cube was clearly once a place people looked for fun and relaxation, but is now irretrievably gone.  Dive says of the project, “The project is about the finality of a missed moment.  Creating it was undoubtedly the most violent process I’ve ever embarked upon.”

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Grr….We’ll Miss you, Gladys!


Sasha: Gladys Rodriguez won my heart when she gave Mr. Zigglez a knitted sweater, with a hoodie and fur. He really looked like a sensitive little guy in it. In a good way. However, puppy clothes aside, Gladys is also an amazing designer who has contributed above and beyond to B/D in the last 3 months. I remember in her interview I was particularly struck by one of her advertisements for a new phone that basically positioned the phone as a sensual soul-mate. I mean, what woman doesn’t want a sexy man(/phone) presented to you on beds of luscious crimson silk, or eagerly awaiting tucked inside a box of decadent chocolates. Genius! Gladys, we’ll REALLY miss your help. I kind of won’t miss your keyboard with Hello Kitty stickers blocking all the letters and number though. Too hard to use. JK! Thanks again!

Fei: PS, You’re leaving too soon…I just started to master your keypad & the laptop track pad! Gladys, please keep us updated with what you’re doing, come by in a UHAUL art gallery if you do that again!

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