Get Social:

Sophia Chang’s Architectural Boundary Blending Installation ‘Suspense’

sophia chang sophia chang installation sophia-chang-suspense-designboom01

sophia-chang-suspense-designboom02

The work of architect and designer Sophia Chang, Suspense is a site-specific installation that blends the inner and outer environments of a gallery space. A recent graduate with distinction at Harvard Graduate School of Design, Chang created Suspense at Invivia Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

By pulling large sheets of Lycra between rectangular frames, her work creates an interactive, suspended environment which both blurs yet highlights the building’s pre-existing architectural features. Some rooms are completely explorable, while others remain visible yet restricted by the installation. Says Chang, “The whole piece holds itself in shape under the tensile forces of being stretched without any extra pneumatic input – except perhaps the breeze flowing in and out of the two doors!” (via designboom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Scott Greenwalt’s Gruesome Mixed Media Paintings

Scott Greenwalt is an Oakland-based painter whose mixed media works walk the line between geometric order and gruesome chaos. His palette often resembles that of our most decay-prone biological structures and fluids: the dirty beige of crumbling skulls, the electric pink of strained arteries, and the bright green of runny mucus. His compositions exist within empty landscapes or without any background context at all. And it should be hard to look at his work for too long. It hits so hard that we should be running for the hills. Instead, probably due to his immense level of skill, it’s hard to look away. Peep some recent work from the artist below.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Colorful Pixels Integrated Into Unique Portrait Photography by Ashihiko Myoshi

 

Cool photographs from Akihiko Myoshi. The photographer is captured in a mirror as bars of color, meant to evoke pixels, are positioned in the frame. A nice commentary on personal identity in the Digital Age. But the coolest thing about this series is Myoshi’s process:

The photographs included here are of mirrors, paper and tape often adhered to the surface of the mirror taken with a large format camera as they attempt to unpack the structural mechanics of photographic representation.

Originally a computer engineering PhD candidate, Myoshi now makes art and teaches at Reed College. (via)

Currently Trending

Diana Scherer’s Photographs Exposes The Secret Root Systems Of Potted Plants

Diana Scherer - Photography

Diana Scherer - Photography

Diana Scherer - Photography

Diana Scherer - Photography

In artist Diana Scherer’s series Nurture Studies, she used soil, seeds, and photography to produce her work. Letting flowers grow in vases rather than the ground, she matured the plants and later broke the glass, exposing the dense roots that took the shape of their containers. They were then photographed at the peak of their lives; Flowers had bloomed, plants grew tall, and nearly all the flora was green.

Scherer’s work is visually very tight. The dirt is packed against the roots, and even out of their containers, the plants hold their shape. Although the plants look highly controlled, there is very little that Scherer can actually manipulate.  Aint-Bad Magazine wrote about this Scherer’s photographs, highlighting this fact. They state:

There is an inherent contradiction in Scherer’s working method. Although she is dedicated to the project and keeps a close eye on whether the roots are developing as desired—checking them carefully and with the utmost precision—her ability to manipulate the plants’ growth is limited. She has to accept the impossibility of total control. This contrast between almost obsessive monitoring and an inability to fundamentally influence events becomes an intense, almost ritual presence in her work. Scherer’s photos are carefully rationed, showing a single moment as the culmination of a long process of growth.

Scherer’s presentation of the plants is very straightforward. There is no extreme lighting and the background is devoid of anything but a color. With the a series with the word “studies” in the title, I see Scherer’s work as specimens, the result of an exercise in timing, and, for lack of a better word, nurture. (Via Aint-Bad magazine)

Currently Trending

An-Sophie Kesteleyn’s Photographs Of Young Children And Their Guns

an-sofie-kesteleyn_07an-sofie-kesteleyn_06an-sofie-kesteleyn_0207_4

Since the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School and other tragic massacres, gun ownership and Second Amendment rights have been a site of intense controversy; on both sides of the debate, fear is a driving force, with one side arguing that guns provide protection and the other asserting that firearms cause more deaths and injuries.

How do guns factor into the lives of younger generations, born during this period of political strife? The photographer An-Sophie Kesteleyn adds to the dialogue with My First Rifle, a series of portraits of children bearing Crikett rifles, a firearm designed for children with a smaller scale and a variety of color choices. Beside each image, Kesteleyn places a torn, school-lined notebook page, onto which her subjects write their deepest fears.

Many of the .22 caliber rifles look like colorful toys; shot atop their small beds and beside Disney princess merchandise, the children appear as though caught by adults in a game of make-believe. They position their guns across their bodies in a protective manner, shielding themselves and their cozy bedrooms from the lens. The rooms, neatly ordered, maintain a certain innocence that is at times irreconcilable with the notion of a weapon intended to wound or kill.

Furthering this thread of childlike naiveté are the children’s drawings depicting their fears; these scrawling notes, touchingly misspelled, often assign terror to fictitious or extinct creatures: zombies, werewolves, dinosaurs. In this way, the artist incorporates the weapons into an elaborate realm of youthful nightmares. Depending on the viewer, this choice could either implicate NRA activists as infantile conspiracy theorists, or it could paint the world as a dangerous place wherein weaponry is necessary. What do you think? (via Feature Shoot)

Currently Trending

Interview: Leif

iChat Image(2645756261)An artist and a philosopher, Leif doesn’t just make illustrations, he sculpts experiences. Each of his beautiful and dramatic pieces delves into the inner workings of the subconscious mind. Leif uses his art as an outlet to explore his inner self and the “psychedelic experience”, (his definition of that later). Though his choice of diction might correlate with that of a hippie, Leif emphasizes that his goal is to distance himself from those stereotypes, as he believes that there is something to be learned from our subconscious. His images truly are captivating – perhaps you can work on getting in touch with your inner psyche while you’re being mesmerized by his work!

Check out his views on his art, humanity, and mountaineering after the jump!

Currently Trending

Wayne Gilbert’s Human Remains Paintings

Wayne Gilbert doesn’t just paint your average minimal iconic paintings? His painting process involves mixed REAL human remains into his work. I’m not sure if he’s visiting the local funeral home to pick up a bag of dust or taking bones and pulverizing them to mix into paint but he definitely gets the “creepiest art material” award for 2011. Check out the rest of his work after the jump.

Currently Trending

The Trance-Like Sounds Of Tamaryn

Tamaryn performing on Friday Nov. 23, 2012 at the Echo in Los Angeles.

Just before 11:30pm, I walked into a darkened Echo to find a very packed house waiting for Tamaryn to take the stage. Within moments, the swirling guitar sound of Rex John Shelverton and the soft voice of Tamaryn had me in a trance. They of course played new songs from their recently released record, Tender New Signs out on Mexican Summer which sounded amazing live. The set was short, but sweet with nary a word uttered from Tamaryn except at the beginning when she asked to turn the lights up a bit on stage complaining it was too dark. Hmmmm, not very “shoegazey”, but hey if you can’t see…

Their North American tour just ended on Saturday with a show at the Independent in San Francisco, but you should definitely pick up a copy of their new record and check out the video for The Garden below directed by Miko Revereza. Beautiful music!

Currently Trending