Jessica Joslin’s Dark And Delicate Sculptures Made From Bone And Metal

12324960943_1ceaf1cb70_c

7

12324809145_31ecafce31_z

11

For her series “Animal Alchemy,” the sculptor Jessica Joslin uses delicate found animal bones and antique metal works to build an array of animal acrobats, who play at balancing on balls and interacting with one another. As suggested by the work’s alliterated title, her pieces present a touching marriage of the biological and chemical. The incorporation of once-living materials succeeds seamlessly for Joslin’s choice to use nostalgic and decorative out-of-date metals; against the rusted filigree of fragmented keepsakes, the time-bleached animal bones appear right at home.

Joslin’s creatures navigate a fine line between fragility and aggression; in a piece titled Troy, the reimagines the deceptively merciful figure of the Trojan Horse, fortifying a spindly neck with bullet casings. Frail skulls wear protective armor as if preparing for some ancient battle. Against the sheen of durable metals, animal bones appear unexpectedly delicate despite their sharp teeth and clawing talons.

With breathtaking precision, the artist allows her bony creatures a single mark of vitality, filling their cavernous sockets with marbly eyes. The careful emotionality of the pieces ultimately makes them more gentle than frightful; the sculptor subtly realizes their personalities and relations with one another through the downcast slant or expectant focus of a pupil. A particularly poignant two-headed tortoise is only given two inner eyes, causing each head to fixate the other without access to a peripheral world. Similarly, a horselike beast gazes upwards balefully, pulling the heavy carriage behind him.

Each piece, beautifully fashioned with discarded bones and obsolete metalworks, performs for the viewer, imploring us not to forget their purpose. Take a look. “Animal Alchemy” is now on display in Scottsdale, AZ at Lisa Sette Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

Adam Lister’s 8-bit Watercolors Of Iconic Moments In Popular Culture

Adam ListerAdam Lister Adam ListerAdam Lister

Adam Lister combines geometric abstraction, cubism, minimalism, pixelation, and popular culture to create his vibrant watercolor paintings. Through visual abstraction, Lister is able to render familiar images from film, television, and the art world, combining various nostalgic representations. In a collaboration with artist Isaac Budmen, Lister also creates 3D sculptures of these 8 bit paintings by using a 3D printer and sandstone that are available for sale.

Lister explains to The Washington Post, “Having grown up playing Atari and Nintendo video games, this broken-down, angular method of processing and displaying information became an interesting guideline for me to translate and selectively restructure some of the most famous paintings in the world.” (via neatorama)

Advertise here !!!

Andrea Hasler’s Sculptures Made Out Of Flesh And Guts

1_press-irred-embrace-the-base-lowres

Installation view Irreducible Complexity/ You and I and Irreducible Complexity/heart

1_press-pv-tent-lowres

1_press-matr-entrance-detail-01lowres

The sculptural work of Andrea Hasler has always created a dichotomous dynamic – push and pull, revulsion and attraction. The Zurich, Switzerland-born artist (previously featured here) has used her trademark visual medium of sculpted fiber-glass covered with wax to insinuate the human body, with equal parts inference to our insides as well as outsides. 

Her newest work is title Embrace the Base, a commission for Greenham Common in Berkshire, England by New Greenham Arts. The site, which held the longest women’s protest against a site storing nuclear weapons in the early 1980′s, is rich with history and emotion. The larger pieces in Hasler’s commission recall the tents that these women protesters erected in their camp outside of the military base which now serves as a cultural meeting place.

“For the New Greenham Arts Exhibition, I have created a new sculptural body of work that takes Greenham Common’s history as a starting point, particularly with the Women’s Peace Camp with its tents situated on the site during this time. This new work also takes into account the historical perspective. as well as entwines with the recreational aspect of how Greenham Common as a site, is being used now, as well as the New Greenham Art gallery being located in the former American Army’s entertainment quarter. Metaphorically I am taking the notion of the tents which were on site during the Women’s Peace Camp, as the container for emotions, and “humanise” these elements to create emotional surfaces.

Hasler mentions that with Embrace the Base she is taking a political element as a starting point and then involving body politics. In Matriarch and Next of Kin, two tent forms, cloaked in skin-like covering, recall the tents that these protesters erected in the Women’s Peace Camp. While one tent is a full-sized replica, the other scaled down, and as the artist hints, most likely represents a mother and child relationship. Often working with skin as a loaded (and typically, simultaneously literal) metaphor, Hasler says, “It’s almost like I am taking the fabric of the tent, the sort of the nylon element of the tent, and I make the fabric, this skin layer as sort of the container for emotion, or sort of the container to hold emotion, as in the skin holding emotion.”

Embrace the Base is on view now at the Corn Exchange Newbury & New Greenham Arts through April 11th, 2014.

Marco Scozzaro Photographs Of Men And Women Wearing Nude Tights (NSFW)

mirror-neurons_01mirror-neurons_03  mirror-neurons_05

Brooklyn-based photographer Marco Scozzaro creates Mirror Neurons, a straight- forwards series of photographs that capture the bodies of men and women wearing nude tights. You might be thinking that this project is kind of pointless, but in actuality it isn’t. Scozzaro’s clever ways of conceptualizing his pieces challenge the viewer to think outside the box and ultimately reach various conclusions at once.

Scozzaro began his project by photographing a series of nudes in front of a neutral background and had the models wear a pair of skin color tights as a metaphor for conformism. As the project developed (and gave it a name), Scozzaro started thinking about the motives behind his artistic choices.

Mirrors Neurons a family of neural cells considered to be the neurological base of imitation. I used this scientific element as a starting point to reflect on how different people follow the same way of thinking. It’s a projection on personal feelings such as solitude, detachment, shyness and the urge to connect with others.—Marco Scozzaro

Like in most of his projects, Scozzaro’s subtle but powerful and beautiful images allow for different layers of interpretation. In this specific case, we can take the nude tights as a symbol that simultaneously represents ideas of oppression and vulnerability. His interesting way of transferring concepts into these carefully arranged portraits extends its topic to a broader range of issues including identity, gender, and relationships. (via Feature Shoot)

Vintage Behind The Scenes Photos Of The American Museum Of Natural History

Wooden framework, first stage for mounting elephant

Wooden framework, first stage for mounting elephant

Assembling bones for Nodosaurus dinosaur skeleton from dinosaur bone collection

Assembling bones for Nodosaurus dinosaur skeleton from dinosaur bone collection

Charles Lang and Carl Sorensen working on skull of Palaeoloxodon antiquus italicus

Charles Lang and Carl Sorensen working on skull of Palaeoloxodon antiquus italicus

Museum staff with fossil shark jaws under restoration

Museum staff with fossil shark jaws under restoration

If you’ve ever been to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, you’ve probably spent some time marveling at the grandiose installations and the larger-than life exhibits of species that are both alive and extinct. The Research Library at the museum kept incredible records of how these things were produced and have the photographs available for view on their website. These behind-the-scenes looks are fascinating, featuring taxidermy, assemblage, and the hoisting up of giant bones.

Employes built a lot of the structures from the ground up, forming armatures for what were birds, elephants, antelopes, and more. There was also fun to be had with large fossils, like a shark’s jaw, where we see one of the employees suspended in air, sitting on it, paying the giant teeth very little mind.

Removed from context, there is a surreal quality to these photographs. They represent a different time, an era when we didn’t have all the technological advances that we do today. Because of this, things in the museum have the tendency to feel dated and look aged, but these records show the amount of knowledge of craft and handiwork that had to go into the giant exhibits that we still visit today. (Via Fish Eyes)

JC Debroize Creates Creepy Typeface With Human Features

JC Debroize Typeface JC Debroize Typeface JC Debroize Typeface

French digital artist JC Debroize has created an unsettling font called “The Human Type” using modeling clay and digital effects. Debroize completed this project as the creative director for the graphic design studio Kerozen.  After using modeling clay to render the shapes of the letters, Debroize took photos of both the letters and the faces of the 7 Kerozen team members. “Then I made a mapping of skin textures on the letters with Photoshop and added the hair and the eyes,” Debroize elaborates. “It was not a problem to show an unflattering image of us. We laughed a lot making this.” (via laughing squid)

Made With Color Presents: Tanya Batura’s Delightfully Grotesque Busts

Achromic_B_home

Monochroma_J_side_

Achromic_F_detail_

Monochroma_K_detail_1_

It’s time for our weekly exclusive artist feature in partnership with premiere website builder Made With Color. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting artists and designers working today who use Made With Color to build their clean and sleek websites. Made With Color is a website builder that helps artists create gorgeous mobile/tablet optimized websites in only a few minutes without having to touch a line of code.This week we are happy to share the work and website of Tanya Batura.

Los Angeles artist Tanya Batura is known for her delightfully grotesque busts that reference a wide array of subject matter such as BDSM, fashion, serial killers, human deformities and classical 15th Century sculpture. Working in ceramics, a medium that has both its detractors and supporters, Batura’s large-scale heads defy even their own materiality, transforming the often staid and predictable parameters of the medium toward a more cohesive and deliberately forceful sensibility.

Batura’s work is at once monumental and delicate, geometric and languorously sensual in their fluidity, starkly devoid of color yet strangely shadowed from within. Pushing both material and content, Batura’s agenda is clearly less about pleasing any perceived “viewer,” and much more about complete absorption into her own process.

An exclusive interview with Tanya Batura is available in Beautiful/Decay Issue:V available on the B/D SHOP.

“We Met On the Internet” Captures Portraits of Couples Who Found Love Through Online Dating

Sarah and Steve, met in a Yahoo chat room

Sarah and Steve, met in a Yahoo chat room

Linny and Pat, met on Craigslist ‘Missed Connections’

Linny and Pat, met on Craigslist ‘Missed Connections’

Mariela and Tiago, met on Tattoodatingsite.com

Mariela and Tiago, met on Tattoodatingsite.com

Cora and Will, met on Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’

Cora and Will, met on Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’

With so many ways of finding love online, it’s no surprise that nearly one-third of married couples in the United States were introduced this way.  In the series We Met On The Internet, photographer Jena Cumbo teams up with writer Gina Tron to document couples whose love stories started from an encounter on the web. Cumbo photographs the couples in their homes and occasionally out in public, while Tron records their story. You might think of Match.com, OKCupid, eHarmony as the way most people find their mate, but in reality, they meet in a bunch of different and sometimes strange ways. We get a glimpse inside of the lives of couples who took advantage of the matchmaking that the Internet has to offer.

Perhaps one of the more unconventional introductions was between Cora and Will (photo directly above), who met through Craigslist “Free Stuff”. Here’s their story:

Cora and Will met because of a Craigslist ‘Free Stuff’ listing. Will had free movie tickets and Cora was the taker. This was back before Craigslist anonymized responses. In the signature of Will’s email, Cora noticed his website. She clicked on it and discovered he was a talented graphic designer. She was intrigued by his work and they kept in touch, and their friendship turned romantic. They are now married and had a daughter in 2011 and a son earlier this year.

We Met On The Internet is an ongoing series, so if you or someone you know met their partner online, you can contact Cumbo. (Via FeatureShoot)