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Paul Yore’s Joyful Sexual Tapestries Provokes And Shocks To The Point Of Censorship

Paul Yore - Illustrations 2
fuck the police

everything is fucked

Paul Yore - Illustrations 12

The world of Paul Yore is encrypted. Behind the simplistic images hand woven on his tapestries there is a subtle will to provoke our thoughts on gender, identity, consumerism and daily violence. The artist chooses to apply psychedelic vivid colors to ultra detailed illustrations : phalluses shooting out rainbows, youths riding white unicorns, skulls conversing with pigeons, and pigs dressed up as police officers. He designs a whole lot of messages in his work, whether it’s tapestries or large installations made out of an accumulation of toys found on the streets. (One of his last pieces, “Everything is fucked”,  was removed from his last show, allegedly representing child sex abuse, see the very two last pictures below).

Paul Yore is protesting in his own way by impregnating the culture of excess on his overflowing tapestries. We are immersed within his dystopia, his family of masturbating characters, naked flying humanized butterflies and cheerful animated vanities. This joyful scenario hides his honest concerns about real debates. The actual consequences of social and cultural nonsense in our existence is a primordial topic. In a world where communicating is done through all kinds of ways, he doesn’t seem to have the freedom he needs to express his ideas. Censorship versus artistic freedom between the artist and the authorities is the culminant point this battle has reached.

Paul Yore’s work will be shown at the Museum of contemporary Art in Australia as part of the Primavera 2015: young Australian artists until december 2015. (via Juxtapoz)

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Hyper Real!! The Sculptures of Ron Mueck

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Ron Mueck (born 1958) is an Australian hyperrealist sculptor working in Great Britain.

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Walk Through The Rain Without Getting Wet With rAndom International

Rain Room at the Barbican, 2012 from rAndom International on Vimeo.

London based collobrative group rAndom International’s interactive installation Rain Room allows you to have the luxury of walking through the rain without getting a single drop on you.  Rain Room is a hundred square metre field of falling water through which it is possible to walk, trusting that a path can be navigated, without being drenched in the process.

As you progress through The Curve, the sound of water and a suggestion of moisture fill the air, before you are confronted by this carefully choreographed downpour that responds to your movements and presence. (via)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Outside The Box

Some people are so creative, original, and unique that they have to constantly tell you how creative, original, and unique they are all the time. This entertaining video is about them.
Watch the full video after the jump.

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Jason Murphy

There is something wrong in Jason Murphy’s portraits. He illustrates people who appear to have a few screws loose. Their often asymmetrical faces dawn either a look of certain absence or of urgent excitement. This is all contrasted of course by his beautiful, delicate mark-making that which feels so light, and feathery.

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Jules Julien

Jules Julien’s portfolio is full of beautifully rendered digital illustrations, playful typography, and a couple mural and poster campaigns for good measure.

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Ebony Patterson’s Complex And Chaotic Installations Question Race And Gender Politics

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson - Mixed Media Installation

Ebony G. Patterson constructs immense and elaborate installations filled with everything you can think of. The artist creates intricate work both attractive and kitschy, using mannequins, sunglasses, beads, beer bottles, and lots of gaudy jewelry. Interested in mixed media tapestries, video, and photography, she often incorporates one or all of these different techniques into her work, creating a complexity of objects and imagery. Exploring racial and gender politics, she uses photographs, mannequins, and clothing to make reference to ‘popular black’ culture in her art. Her work, so filled with patterns and flashy objects, is highly satirical, commenting on race, questioning stereotypes often associated with the culture she is representing. Concepts on beauty are also questioned, as the figures in her work are adorned with jewelry, bright colors, and flashy clothing. Although the mannequins appear to be making an attempt to look attractive, they inevitably look over-the-top and ridiculous.

When you see Patterson’s installations, there is an overwhelming sense of color and pattern inviting you to examine every last detail of the chaotic mass of objects. You get lost in a see of mismatched clothing and clashing patterns, all shown like a department store display. Transforming her mannequins into striking objects participating in her art, their individual genders are often blurred, pointing out pre-conceived notions concerning the masculine and feminine. Her installations not only have mannequins, but also still humans that appear to be inanimate until they spring to life, turning her installation into a performance piece. This talented Chicago-based artist creates confrontational work that, due to content and appearance, is not easily ignored

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