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Alexis Facca’s 3D Spaces Appear Like Two-Dimensional Graphics In “The Flat” Project

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Latest collaboration between paper and set designer Alexis Facca and photographer Tom Joye transforms three dimensional spaces to look like flat, two dimensional paintings. With the creative use of angle and perspective, Facca and Joye were able to obtain the desired illusion and deceive the viewer’s eye.

The Flat Project actually features a miniature 1 x 1 meter set made from paper but in 3D. Seems like the set was flipped and turned to create images from various angles. Without knowing, it is hard to tell which is the floor or ceiling. Here’s an explanation by Facca on two of her creations:

“For example in the first image the red is the ground, the wood a wall on left and blue is in the foreground. On the second image (below) the ground is made with wood and the red.”

(via mocoloco)

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Kate MacDowell

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According to Kate MacDowell, her varied travels from Italy to rural India have greatly influenced her unique artistic vocabulary. She began studying ceramics full-time in 2004. Since then, she has created pieces that ascertain their prestige through the perfect juxtaposition of the beautiful and the alarming. MacDowell’s work is so precise that it feels as if it exists more comfortably in reality than in imagination. If you’re in the UK, you can see her work in the upcoming group show, Shadowside, at bo.lee Gallery in Bath.

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Design Watch: Bernhard Burkard

Bernhard Bukard’s Curt Deck Chair is probably the coolest outdoor furniture we’ve seen in a while. On his site Bernard assures us that, “even though it looks dangerous it provides comfort seating and relaxing in every occasion. To achieve best stability, it needs to be leaned against walls or rails in a flat angle. The anti-slip coated stand provides safe grip on every surface.”

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Michael Massaia’s Melting Ice Cream Portraits Capture Fleeting Childhood Moments

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Photographer Michael Massaia has been lauded for his haunting black and white photographs that catch the shadow life of cities at night. In his photo series, Transmorgify, he turns his eye not to a city caught in limbo, but rather a period of time. Massaia captures childhood treats melting into swirls and psychedelic puddles, creating traces of sugar and cream that look almost like wisps of smoke. 

From the classic Neapolitan ice cream bar to more modern fare such as My Little Pony popsicles with gumball eyes, the series shows a simpler time in a moment of transformation. Set against a stark black background, though, the photos aren’t quite portraits; they seem to take a deeper look, as though putting childhood memories on a microscope slide.
More than just sticky remnants between an 8-year-old’s fingers, Massaia’s work seems to allude to something more precious and ephemeral. Viewed from one perspective, the melting ice cream has the same pastel and neon colors as a sidewalk chalk drawing, smudged by fresh rain. From another perspective, the photos speak of decay and something that can’t be revisited, sweeter maybe in memoriam.
Transmorgify is currently on display at Gallery 270 in New Jersey until May 16th.

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James Blagden

James Blagden

Brooklyn artist James Blagden isn’t worried about offending you with racial stereotypes. Or rather the aim is to offend to get the point across. Fusing together a myriad of influences and topics found in African American popular culture, the artist pokes fun at the ideas and images we accept on a regular broadcasted basis. Whatever the common conception, the nerdiness of Asians in mainstream cinema, African Americans and basketball, gold teeth and bling, he’s done it all. Check out an interview Format Mag did on James.

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Katharine Morling’s Ceramic Sculptures Look Like 3D Line Drawings

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Katharine Morling is a ceramicist who sculpts everyday objects with a creative, cross-media twist: once the clay dries (a process which can take up to several months), she draws on the pieces using an underglaze pen, turning them into three-dimensional, life-sized “drawings.” Among her works are tape measures, sewing machines, and matchboxes — seemingly ordinary items that, when sketched upon, take on a cartoonish, character-filled, and somewhat surreal appearance. As Morling explains on her About page, narrative, intuition, and the embodiment of emotion are important facets to her creations:

“Each piece, on the surface, an inanimate object, has been given layers of emotion and embedded with stories, which are open for interpretation in the viewer’s mind. […] The life size pieces and the unexpectedness of the scale create a slightly surreal experience as you walk through this strange environment. I work very instinctively, one piece leads to the next, I try not to pin down what I am doing or even why. I have to trust and believe that I can communicate through this medium. My searching is never complete; each piece is a journey for answers that are only hinted at, with more questions.” (Source)

As Morling explains in an article written on her work for ELLE Decoration (December 2014, no. 268), her sculptures begin as character-developing, one-minute sketches. She then gives each one “short, Hitchcock-y titles” before working them into clay (Source). Fired without glaze, the works retain the perfect “rough” quality that adds to the illustrated aesthetic. In addition to practical items, Morling’s works also delve into the fantastical, such as sea turtles crawling out of a suitcase or boxes exploding with butterflies. Visit Morling’s website and Facebook page to view more of her work. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Daniele Del Nero’s Miniature Models of the Urban Landscape are Covered in Real Mold

“After Effects” is a “series of architectural scale models” by Italian artist/designer Daniel DelNero. The models are “constructed with black paper covered with flour and a layer of mold to create the effect of old abandoned buildings.”

My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.

First of all, I’m seeing at least four different colors of mold going on with these. That variety alone is impressive. And his positioning and construction of the work is right where it needs to be. See more miniature, decayed urban scenery after the jump. (via)

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Kamrooz Aram

This Iranian artist living and working out of Brooklyn, NY makes paintings that look like they can only be found on Geocities sites and Google image searches. They have this janky magical pixelated quality that I love in jpegs…

 

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