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Artist Turns River Stones Into Meditative Mandalas With Endless Patterns Of Colorful Dots

Elspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on Stone

Australian artist Elspeth McLean takes ordinary ocean rocks and turns them into colorful, geometric Mandalas. Through intense detail and repetitive patterns, the artist finds meditation in painting these found stones with endless acrylic dots. The acrylic paint used on her pocket-sized creations allows her to add an element of dimension in her already layered colors. These intense colors create a palette so crisp and brilliant, it is as if the stones are encrusted with jewels. Painting dots has become so embedded in McLean’s art process, that she even coined the term “Dotillism” to describe her unique style. Each dot that is painted to create her intricate, endless patterns takes an incredible amount of patience and focus. Although completing these Mandala patterns may seem like a difficult task, McLean describes this process as a grounding experience where she can find enjoyment and experience reflection.

The Mandala is a spiritual symbol in Eastern religions that holds meditative properties. It is no wonder McLean has chosen such a strong, healing symbol in her work, as she believes in the healing nature of color and art. She pulls influence from seasons, cosmos, mythology, and ancient art to create her hand-held Mandalas. Her interest in the cosmos can be seen in her stones that are painted not as a geometric pattern, but instead as incredible constellations, still painted in her dotted signature style. An avid traveler, the Australian artist is now living in Canada, gathering inspiration from the new landscapes she perceives throughout her journey. (via Demilked)

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Painter Simon Birch’s Depictions Of Youthful Angst

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Using an off key palette in his latest series of paintings The Inevitable, Hong Kong based artist Simon Birch fuses gestural marks with the figure. His pictures of young subjects twist through various painted emotions trying to break free of youthful angst. In the process they achieve a rebirth witnessed through thickly impastoed swatches.  All the faces in Birch’s paintings seem disguised and obscured by paint thus suggesting an inner life. He depicts his subjects as breaking loose or apart from something. The marks obscuring the faces seem to be attacking Birch’s figures and become powerful metaphors concerning age and maturity. The underlining violence in his work can be taken a number of ways. It can be viewed as the violence we bring upon ourselves due to insecurity and peer pressure. Since most of the work in his current series either focuses on the nude body or just the head, we are reminded that the brain rules the body not the other way around.

Birch is a British born artist that has lived in Hong Kong for the past twenty years. He has had a long career engaging in everything from painting, video to installation. Along with visual art he has been involved with urban dance music, organizing club nights in the UK, Australia and Hong Kong where he showcased the scene’s most prominent DJs. An interesting fact about Birch is that early on in his art career, he took a job in construction as a way to make money helping to build the Tsing Ma, the world’s ninth largest suspension bridge. (via myampgoesto11)

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Daniel Aristizába’s Surreal Dream-Like Digital Pop Art

Daniel Aristizába - Design

Daniel Aristizába - Design Daniel Aristizába - Design

Daniel Aristizába - Design

Daniel Aristizábal is a graphic designer and illustrator who creates incredible digital works of art that are surreal and transport the viewers to a topsy-turvy Rube Goldberg-esque world. His Huevos series is playfully inspired by Dali’s “Eggs on the Plate without the Plate,” showing colorful variations on the common egg. 

In some of Aristizabal’s work, the 3D elements pop out, almost like digital sculptures. Other works, such as his “Glitched Cubism” piece, utilizes the 2D GIF format to play with the dimensions and perspective of cubism. In an interview with Instagram, he says that his work is a “retro, colorful, geometric bonanza.” His art seems to draw on a palette that is by turns neon and sherbet but always whimsical.
Aristizabal continues to say:
 
“My main sources of inspiration are random thoughts that pop in my mind, like memories of dreams and places that I used to imagine when I was a child. I think the term ‘pop surrealism’ works well for me. My work is full of simplicity and organic shapes. It is nostalgic in its essence.”
 

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Nathalie Croquet Spoofs High Fashion Ads Using Models That Encompass A Diverse Range Of Age And Body Types

Nathalie Croquet - Photography and StylingNathalie Croquet - Photography and Styling advertising spoofNathalie Croquet - Photography and Styling

Nathalie Croquet is a French stylist and journalist who has cleverly recreated high fashion and beauty advertisements in an Instagram series entitled “Spoof”. Having once worked as Biba’s fashion editor and Jean Paul Gaultier’s photo director, Croquet is deeply familiar with the types of imagery that have defined such marketing campaigns, from Eric Bompard’s pink-toned whimsy to Isabel Marant’s sultry and pseudo-dishevelled aesthetic. The lighting, makeup, and styling are remarkably similar between the originals and their spoofs (the studded plaid shirt in the Eleven Paris parody appears near-identical, for example), with the critical differences lying in the models themselves: they encompass a diversity of body types and ages.

Playful and light-hearted, Croquet’s imagery reminds us of the theatricality of fashion advertising; lighting, makeup, and costumes are carefully arranged to appeal to marketed notions of high-end beauty. The “Spoof” models do a great job recreating the postures and facial expressions to reveal both the parody and the construction of the original campaign imagery. Visit Croquet’s Instagram and website to learn more. (Via AnOther)

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Marcelo Monreal’s Surreal Collages Replace Our Insides With Beautiful Blooms

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Marcelo Monreal is a Brazilian collage artist who cracks skulls in the most beautiful way possible. Digitally splitting parts of models and celebrities faces (Christopher Walken and Kate Moss are among them), he fuses beautiful blooms with the broken shapes. Small, colorful flowers grow from behind eye sockets, in the place of noses, and out of mouths. This surreal series is called Faces [UN]bonded.

In Monreal’s opinon, people don’t often tell us who they really are. Instead, they keep parts of their real selves hidden. He opens them up with his collages and reveals the rare moments in which we see the beauty that’s behind their appearance. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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Jihyun Park’s Intricate Drawings Are Created With Thousands Of Tiny Holes Burnt With Incense

Jihyun Park - incense stick Jihyun Park - incense stick Jihyun Park - incense stick Jihyun Park - incense stick

South Korean artist Jihyun Park creates incredibly complex images by burning minute holes in rice paper with incense sticks. He then mounts the finished ‘drawings’ onto varnished canvases. The final results are beautifully serene images of trees, mountains, clouds, forests and branches. As a kind of reverse pointillism, Park is interested in the contrasts between empty space  and positive space, or by taking something away (parts of the paper, and the incense stick) to create something new (the image).

Inspired by the books Gulliver’s Travels, Utopia, and Erewhon and after seeing the Japanese animated movie Castle in the Sky, Park became interested in the ideas of utopia and harmony. He expands these connections in his work further:

My recent work, Incense Series, focuses on this relationship while searching for the promised harmonic balance that utopia brings. Ironically, the word “utopia” in Korean is “Yi Sang Hwang” and “Hwang” means “incense”. (Source)

Park also talks about the ideas of positive and negative further. He says the shadows created by the holes in the paper are playing off of the light reflected from behind them. To him this is a fine example of Yin and Yang and two opposites who complicate and strengthen each other. He also chooses to outline his subjects or to fill them in – working with reverses in an aesthetic sense as well.

The subjects addressed in my work range from the natural world to memories of the past, reflecting the constant physical and emotional changes in our environment. It is my hope that the “moments” I captures of my subjects are ones when they are at their most ideal– true utopias. While drawing them with the incense, I am “holding” a split moment of harmony in my hands. (Source)

(Via Bored Panda)

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Sipho Mabona Transforms Paper And Sugar Into Wondrous Stained Glass Sculptures

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

sipho mabona sculpture

Sipho Mabona reinvents traditional origami practices. In a series called vectorgraphics he creates forms where the paper is kept flat. Both aesthetically and spiritually it recalls stained glass windows and resembles colorful panes you might see in a new age cathedral. He furthers the conversation by mixing the pigment with sugar water and achieves a result that improves upon the medium transforming it into something else. There’s hesitation to say ‘new age’ but it does embrace qualities beyond this world.

Mabona started working with paper at a young age making traditional airplane designs. When he was a teenager he turned to origami and has since engaged in many different projects using the material. Besides graphically inspired work and traditional origami figures he has made a life size elephant. All white and made out of folded paper it is a feast for the eyes. His origami has been used to tell the Asics sneaker story. In a short entitled “Origami: in the Pursuit of Perfecton” it traces the company’s history through Mabona’s models.

Origami is the traditional art of making sculptures out of paper without glue, tape or staples. It has three distinct origins dating back to the 16th century. In China, folded paper was burned during funerals as currency for the deceased into the next world. In Japan, the first reference appeared in a short poem where a paper butterfly design was mentioned at a Shinto wedding and in Europe napkin folding became popular with 17th century nobility eventually replacing it with porcelain.   (via designboom)

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Alana Dee Haynes Illustrates Photographed Bodies With Flowing Patterns And Lines

Alana Dee Haynes - Photography, IllustrationAlana Dee Haynes - Photography, Illustration Alana Dee Haynes - Photography, Illustration Alana Dee Haynes - Photography, Illustration

Alana Dee Haynes is a Brooklyn-based artist who turns the bodies of her photographed subjects into illustrated surfaces, transforming blank skin and clothing into undulating patterns and shapes. We featured some of her works a couple years ago, but since then, Haynes has been continuing to create intricate and whimsical pieces. Peruse the flowing imagery and you will see kneecaps split open into eyes, collarbones overlain with lips, and torsos swarmed with circular, overlapping patterns that transform models into scaled, serpentine creatures. In a fascinating interview with Juxtapoz, Haynes explains how she uses individual physical characteristics to inspire her illustrations, thereby exploring alternative forms of bodily representation:

“Everyone has a certain way they see the world. Some things jump out at people, while others pass them by. I see faces and patterns everywhere. When I look at people, I connect their beauty marks, and find faces in their knuckle lines. It’s just the way I live. So, naturally, I see these things in photographs too. It is not synesthesia, but it is a similar way of viewing multiple layers in things.” (Source)

Fashion also plays a significant role in Haynes’ work. Just as clothes can be creatively worn to signify individuality, her illustrations transform the models’ entire bodies into expressive surfaces. “When it comes down to it, I believe fashion should bring out emotions and be relatable, as if wearing your own skin and mind,” Haynes explained to Juxtapoz. “And my skin is definitely full of faces and patterns” (Source). Whereas the face is so often read as the sole locus of emotional and cognitive display, Haynes’ brilliant line work illuminates the dynamism and individuality that exists everywhere: in our arms, legs, hands, clothing, and more.

Click here to read more of Haynes’ chat with Juxtapoz, and check out her website, Tumblr, and Instagram for more beautiful work. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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