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Incredible Gif Shows A Microscope Zooming In On A Bug, On A Bug, On A Bug

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The beauty of the .gif file movement is the documentation of the moving image. This leads to explorations in effects, one of the most impressive being the zoom, which taken to it’s logical conclusion can have stunning results. One .gif in particular, taken by James Tyrwhitt-Drake, utilizes a scanning electronic microscope from the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility, and clipping each scanned image into a fantastically detailed, zooming .gif.

Tyrwhitt-Drake, who also runs the blog Infinity Imagined, begins the .gif with a view of an amphipod (a classification of shell-less crustacean), zooming in further to reveal a diatom (a class of algae notable for their silica shells) on top of the amphipod, and further revealing a microscopic bacterium. Proving once again (if proof was needed) how visually stunning science can be. (via smithsonian)

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Jenny Aryton Encapsulates Childhood Memories In Molten Glass

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British artist Jenny Aryton creates “miniature wonderlands captured in molten glass.” Almost like snow globe depictions of every day life, Jenny Aryton’s work physically encapsulates intimate depictions of her private world. Gaining inspiration from her young daughter, she aims to gather excitement from the mundane. Her work tends to have a “domestic twist” as she allows her surrounding of her home and family guide the way as her source imagery. Her process begins by creating small metal wire figurines. She fashions tiny sweaters, chairs, trees, shovels, and other objects found in an everyday family home. She then organizes a simplistic scene, almost like a child playing with a dollhouse. After everything has been arranged, Aryton then encases it between two layers of molten hot glass which is poured at 1100ºC (2012ºF). She uses what is called sandcasting. She molds the overall shape of the piece in sand — just as a plaster sculptor would do with clay or wax. One the first layer is poured, she has one brief moment, while the glass is still fluid, to manipulate the aspects of the piece. The second layer is then poured and the whole piece is placed to set in a kiln for two days where it will take its final form. The glass, as a fragile and volatile material, will solidify differently each time, creating a one of a kind piece.  The delicate and cloudy imperfection of each piece almost seems to mimic the memory of a child. The have a solemn charm that is nostalgic yet innocent. Each piece is quiet, quaint and unique. (via iGNANT)

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Hallucination: Martin Eder’s Menacing, Black Sculptural Installation Challenges Our Perception

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We’ve featured the paintings of German artist Martin Eder before, such as his portraits of female warriors and erotic kitsch. Another notable work of his is an installation known as “Hallucination,” which was shown in the Dimensions Variable exhibition at Berlin’s Galerie Eigen + Art in May 2013. The installation features a massive sculpture (6m x 10m x 10m) made of twisted black metal that appears to hover above the ground prior to impact. Like an ominous void, the object resonates with stillness and terror, unsettling the psyche with its violent yet silent presence.

The press release for “Hallucination” likens the object to Plato’s Cave, an allegory in Western philosophy that centers around the development of cognition and one’s sense of reality. Eder’s structure resembles a cave, a negative cavity that produces tension between abstraction and reality. Its liminal status (not falling, not making contact) makes it an object of infinite reflection; it becomes a symbol of a distant threat while also operating as a source of knowledge. Our physical relationship to the object—standing in a room or a hallway with it, for example—shapes how it manifests itself in our imaginations.

Visit Eder’s website and Galerie Eigen + Art to learn more. (Via Sweet Station)

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B/D’s Best of 2010- Shadow Art

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It is time to up your game, shadow puppeteers. This morning presents you with some shadow art that will challenge your routine. The main artists featured here are Kumi Yamashita plus the art team Tim Noble and Sue Webster (who are responsible for the above image). Even if you’re afraid of your own shadow, don’t miss out on the goodies after the jump.

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Akira Beard’s Water Color Pop Icons

Akira Beard, a San Francisco based artist and teacher at the Academy of Art University, is well known for his engaging watercolor portraitures of pop culture icons. The messages that usually accompany these illustrations are often centered around the issues of cultural topics, such as, identity, society, and race.

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Amy Stein’s Photographs: Halloween On the Street and Animals in the Woods

 

These photographs are taken from two series by NYC  photographer Amy Stein: “Domesticated”, and “Halloween in Harlem”. The photos were put together a while ago now, but I’ve always loved them. And, as Ms. Stein seems to be dealing with an issue involving use of her work without permission and $40,000, I figured she deserved some love.

“Domesticated” depicts real stories ivolving animals and humans culled from local news stories. Stein used often used taxidermied animals in her perfectly positioned shots, which include bobcats confused by newfound construction and curious bears checking out backyard pools.

“Halloween in Harlem” is pretty straightforward: Stein’s eye set to run freely capturing the spirit of the holiday and creepy children in masks on the street.

Check out images from both series below.

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Peace Not War: Artist Replaces Soldiers Guns With Flowers

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Multi-media installation artist, video maker, designer and all-round talented guy Mister Blick has made some beautiful collages. Placing colorful flowers on old war time photos, in the place of where guns normally would be, he makes a sweet and subtle statement. Alluding to many different political actions in war time, his message is clear. Why do we continue to use force against one another?

The subject of his collages will resonate around the world, but perhaps more so in Portugal. On April 25, 1974, there was a military coup in Lisbon which is now known as the Carnation Revolution. When the population took to the streets to celebrate the end of the dictatorship, carnations were placed into the barrels of the soldiers’ guns, and placed on their uniforms. It is a classic example of how radical political and societal change can take place without the use of bullets.

Mister Blick’s images are a simple reminder of how quiet, gentle actions are usually the ones that end up heard the loudest. And it is a timely celebration of one of the most original revolutions in Europe, and in the world. Happy Freedom Day everybody! (Via Honestly WTF)

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Ross Lovegrove’s Liquidkristal Glass Looks Like Flowing Water



Designer Ross Lovegrove teamed up with glass manufacturer Lasvit to create the new architectural glass panel. The panels take inspiration from natural forms. Using a high precision heat transfer process the crystal glass flows and optically shifts that which is behind it. People and objects look as if they are standing behind a waterfall. Colors warp and fracture throughout the surface. Organic shapes created by nature are processed into dynamic architecture.

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