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Endia Beal’s Portraits Of White Women With Black Hairstyles

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Photographer Endia Beal has created corporate-style portraits of white women with hairstyles often worn by black women for her series, “Can I Touch It?”. Beal was first inspired to do this project after interning in the IT department at Yale while she was there earning her M.F.A. At the time, Beal, who is tall and black, was sporting a large red afro. She stood out among her mostly shorter, white male colleagues, and one even mentioned to her that a rumor was circulating around the office that the men were curious about her hair and wanted to touch it. She eventually asked some of her male colleagues to touch her hair, and even pull it. A week later, she recorded their reactions. She wanted the men to experience something new, and they were admittedly uncomfortable.

She next sought out middle-aged women who work in the corporate world for “Can I Touch It?”. “I wanted people that had a certain idea of what you’re supposed to look like in the workspace, because it would be a challenge for them to understand what I experienced in that space…And to a degree, many young white women have shared that experience, but for older white women it’s an experience they haven’t necessarily had.”

“I said, ‘I am going to give you a black hairstyle,’ and they were like, ‘You’re going to give me cornrows?’ ” Beal recalls. “And I said, ‘No, we’re going to do finger waves.’ ‘Finger waves? What’s that? You mean from the ’20s?’ And I said, ‘These are a little bit different type of finger waves!’ ”

She says the women were excited to learn something new and to show off their hairstyles. Through this project, Beal hopes to start a conversation among people who come from various gender, race, and generational backgrounds, especially within the rigidity of a corporate environment. She is currently in North Carolina continuing this project, and is considering having the women enter and work at their offices with these new styles, after which she would record their experiences. (via slate)

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Last Chance To See Cody Hudson At Guerrero Gallery

We’ve been fans of Cody Hudson & Struggle Inc. for over a decade now (Check out our interview with him in Issue: D of B/D!) so it’s only right that we  urge all of you to go out to Guerrero Gallery in SF and check out his show before it comes down on on June 7th. Cody has dozens of new pieces from small geometric drawings to large scale installations in the show. My favorite works are the above wooden sculptures. They aren’t the biggest works in the show but these intimate sculptures pack a powerful punch.

 

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Greenpeace-Ocean Action

Check out this simple yet beautiful animation by Jens Blank about Greenpeace’s efforts to stop illegal fishing practices in the Europe. Watch the full video after the jump!

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Laura Taylor

Los Angeles’ Laura Taylor excels at taking beguiling photos that quietly demand your attention. Lending her talents to an exciting storytelling project called The Smartest Thing She’s Ever Said, Taylor’s mystique draws you in slowly but surely. You end up a little lost in her world, in the best of ways. Here, we talk to Laura about her approach to photography and end up with a craving for cake.

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Minimal With A Dash Of Pop

 

 

Stas Volovik  paints some nice minimal abstract paintings that have just a hint of pop to them. There’s a few good collages on his portfolio site as well but the paintings take the cake.

 

 

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Billy Rennekamp’s Sports Art

I can’t stand sports but Billy Rennekamp’s humorous sculptures and videos are making me rethink my hatred for all team related athletic activities.

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Billowing Cloud Sculpture Represents The Amount Of Trash Accumulated In NYC In One Hour

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From afar, it’s unclear what this billowing, cloud-like sculpture is made of. Up close, however, you can see that it’s comprised of various plastic bottles that are strung together in round, pleasing shape. New York-based architects and designers  STUDIO KCA collected a combination of one gallon jugs, 16 and 24-ounce bottles and compiled them into this ethereal, massive structure. In total, the installation titled Head in the Clouds  is made from 53,780 containers to represent the amount of trash that’s thrown away in New York City in just one hour.

Beneath the cloud’s exterior is a small seating/dreaming pavilion that accommodates up to 50 people. It’s meant for visitors to contemplate the light and color filtering through the cloud, as well as our consumption problem and the impact on the environment. Sand, water, and a curved aluminum frame prove the structural integrity.

Head in the Clouds made its debut last year on New York’s Governor’s Island. The stay was temporary, and the studio is now looking for its next home. (Via Colossal)

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Bad At Sports Presents: Jeffrey Deitch interviewed by Carlo McCormick

Jeffrey Deitch interviewed by Carlo McCormick

An in-depth and deeply interesting interview with Jeffrey Deitch conducted by writer & critic Carlo McCormick about Jeffrey’s NYC legacy and plans for his big move to Los Angeles as the Director of The MOCA. Presented by our Chicago art audio blog Bad At Sports.

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