Get Social:

Laylah Ali Continues To Comment On Society With Her Stick Figures

laylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali paintinglaylah ali painting

The stick figures of Laylah Ali are like no other. In her latest show The Acephalous Series which means “headless” she continues on her path of creating a new population of figures with strange expressions and round heads. Her newest resemble vegetables of the cucumber and celery kind. Whereas her former works have studied race relations, torture and hierarchy her newest seem to comment on the state of farming and the food industry. In a number of pieces there seem to be deformities of sorts which could be alerting to chemicals which are rampant in food that isn’t organic. A hybrid baby figure lurking in some might also symbolize sickness affecting unborn and young things. Its sometimes hard to tell with work of this nature what it all means but that’s what makes it both fun and enjoyable. It’s a challenge the artist gives the viewer by making something entirely original.

Ali has been on the international art radar for sometime. She participated in the Venice Bienniale in 2003 and Whitney Biennial in 2004. Her work as a whole is attributed to various types of art stemming from ancient hieroglyphics to comic book serials. She speaks about social issues affecting men, women and minorities using everyday objects such as gym balls, sneakers and sticks.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jennifer Presant’s Alluring Paintings Blend Indoor And Outdoor Spaces Blur The Lines Between Recollection, Projection, And Reality

jenniferpresant-9 jenniferpresant-8 jenniferpresant-4 jenniferpresant-2

Artist Jennifer Presant is a painter with training in figurative realism and a background in graphic design. Her multifaceted works are a combination of indoor and outdoor spaces. Bedrooms look like they’re in a park, statues are on beaches, and French doors open onto ice. “Thematically, my paintings address the complexity of memory, by blurring the lines between recollection, projection, and reality,” Presant writes in an artist statement. “Each painting becomes a psychological landscape or waking dream, reinforcing the fluid relationships between time, memory and place.

The contemporary media has a huge impact on the content of Presant’s images. She says:

By merging both real and fictitious images in these painted fictional documentaries, I explore the conflation of our media-saturated lives and our lived reality; we live among images and in many ways as images. Our memories of events have become distorted. With media today, we have grown accustomed to watching ourselves and living from a voyeuristic standpoint. With these paintings, the viewer’s imagination plays an important role in the piece, while also being implicated in the voyeurism depicted. (Via Feather of Me)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Sophia Narrett ‘Paints’ With Wool In Her Romantic Embroideries

Sophia Narrett - embroideries Sophia Narrett - embroideries Sophia Narrett - embroideries Sophia Narrett - embroideries

Sophia Narrett‘s detailed fictional scenes look like luscious oil paintings, but once you look closer, it’s clear they are a bit more special than that. She uses thread, wool and fibers to build dark and romantic narratives of men and women in group settings. The actions in each embroidery are at first unclear and seem a bit suspicious and foreboding. Her pieces are a bit like an illustration from a murder mystery. Growing up watching reality dating shows and reading books about romantic courtship and Victorian matchmaking practices, Narrett depicts a world that is cheesy, yet sublime and magical. The figures in her scenarios are camp characters in a glamorous story looking for happiness.

After switching from painting almost exclusively with oil paints to experimenting with embroidery and stitching, Narrett soon found the materials and techniques that suited her. She explains more to The Huffington Post:

As I continued working in embroidery I became interested in the repercussions that embroidery holds for the image and story, as well as the way that it dictates the process. As the emotionality of the narratives heightens to that of melodrama, the intense investment in the embroidery process required to create legible images speaks to the overwrought nature of the fantasy. (Source)

 

Her thread work is so rich and dense, the image seems to dripping of the canvas. Her work of beautiful fiction features women throughout, and Narrett is happy to connect the subject matter to the historical connection of embroidery being ‘women’s work’. She says this about the subject:

Of course, the embroidery connotes the tradition of embroidery as women’s work, as well as the feminist artists who subverted that history, while the paintings carry the weight of or are bolstered by the history of painting. Still I would say that my use of both mediums is primarily as a conduit for visual ideas. (Source)

And she expresses her ideas of fantasy, romance, courtship and magic beautifully. See more of her work after the jump.

Currently Trending

Trevor Wheatley Places Slang In The Great Outdoors In His Text-Based Installations

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Trevor Wheatley - Mixed Media

Toronto based artist Trevor Wheatley takes common slang to the streets, placing words and lingo in the public sphere where you cannot ignore it. He constructs large-scale sculptures of words like “real talk” and “nah” and installs them amongst trees and in rivers. Can you imagine hiking and seeing the word “squad” as you looked up into the trees? His often boldly colored text becomes so out of place in the wilderness, creating a very surreal site. Each installation displays strong pop-culture references of phrases commonly used. Interested in typography, Wheatley’s text-based work is range in font, color, and materials.

Wheatley takes this common language and makes it static, giving it a more permanent element. Language and slang changes so frequently, a word or phrase could be outdated as soon as Wheatley has completed the installation. Nevertheless, they bring back nostalgia and even add a bit of humor to their environment. Slang and lingo can often bring to mind a certain type of person or stereotype that we associate with the word or phrase. Wheatley’s sculptures take us beyond these preconceived notions of language by taking them out of their usual context and placing them in a new environment. Like taking a word out of its original context can change it’s meaning, the artist gives new meaning and life to the lingo, as they are located in serene nature. (via Juxtapoz)

Currently Trending

The Wearable Art Of Norihito Hatanaka Looks Good Enough To Eat

Norihito Hatanaka - Fake FoodNorihito Hatanaka - Fake FoodNorihito Hatanaka - Fake Food

Are you hungry for weird, hyper-realistic art? Look no further, the highly unique, wearable art by Japanese artist Norihito Hatanaka will satisfy your taste. Of course, not literally, as the “jewelry” this artist makes only resembles food. Hatanaka is not your typical artist, he is a fake food artist, creating wearable art ranging from bracelets, necklaces, and earrings made to look exactly like different kinds of foods. His bacon bracelets with earrings to match appear to still be sizzling, and his fruit necklace seems to be dripping with juices. The artist explains that in Japanese culture, food aesthetics are extremely important, making Japan a hot spot for impeccable fake-food skill.

How and where would a person learn how to create such a wide variety of fake foods so perfectly, you might ask? Well, Hatanaka is just following the family business. He took over his father’s business of a factory that creates fake food, models to display in restaurants. Having been interested in art as a student, Hatanaka has taken inspiration from this business and crossed over into the art world, bringing it a new flavor. Learning this fake food craft at his factory, he now sketches his appetizing creations and then constructs them into wonderfully gaudy jewelry. Inspired by real life dishes, many of his pieces include a full meal, complete with peas and rice on the side. With Hatanaka’s wearable art, you could literally wear a three-course meal! Although it would take a special kind of person to pull off wearing such a statement piece, I would not be surprised to see one of Hatanaka’s unbelievably crafted pieces worn on the runaway. (via The Creators Project)

Currently Trending

Brian Robertson: Exploring Foreign Worlds

PlentyoffishBrian Robertson

Brian Robertson

Brian Robertson

Brian Robertson’s paintings are executed with the precision of a surgeon, but beneath this graphic hard-edged aesthetic is an honest and delicate appraisal of humanity that subtly reveals itself the longer you spend with the work. The human condition could be defined in many ways – our never ending attempts to understand the meaning of life, the ongoing search for gratification, our sense of curiosity, the inevitability of isolation, or the innate knowledge of our eventual demise. Robertson’s practice dives headfirst into this existential quagmire with a level of honesty and playfulness that is rarely executed so well.

Oddly familiar (yet simultaneously foreign) worlds showcase a variety of anthropomorphized structures that seem to exist in a place just outside of reality.Recognizable elements in the paintings serve to ground the otherworldly figures as they traverse unknown environments. These moments of certainty establish a point of reference for the viewer, but the tightly organized chaos surrounding these moments forms a whole new set of questions. What are these strange objects? Do they serve a purpose? Where are they? In each case, there is no definitive answer, but the carefully constructed scenes lend themselves toward metaphorical interpretation. Certain paintings evoke a quiet solitude while others maintain a sort of liveliness, as the structures attempt to understand their current environments.

Robertson’s paintings all seem to function as a metaphor of humanity’s ongoing quest to navigate our way through an uncertain world. In that respect, we are very much like the futuristic amalgamations depicted in these works.

The opening reception for Meta-Structures, featuring the work of Brian Robertson and Max Kauffman will be from 6-10PM at Black Book Gallery in Denver, Colorado.

Currently Trending

Light Sensitive Spray Paint Could Deter Drivers From Hitting Cyclists At Night

LIFEPAINT product designLIFEPAINT product designLIFEPAINT product design

Now when the sun goes down cyclists can feel a little safer. A new product developed by Volvo called “LifePaint” is a spray riders can put on their clothes and bikes which will remain invisible until night falls and the headlights of a car hit and then it will turn a shocking white alerting the driver. The spray is currently available only in the UK and can be sprayed on clothes and bikes which will last up to a week. It can be easily washed off if needed. From the demonstrations shown it gives the rider a ghostlike appearance adding to the alert value against the night sky. According to reports free samples have been flying off shelves and those locations where it’s not available have had many inquiries.

There has also been a lot of criticism from cycle advocacy groups who feel the auto industry is putting blame on the victim for creating such a product. They feel these huge conglomerates should focus on making cars safer for cyclists by installing outside airbags and restricting cars to lighter colors. They also claim very little evidence exists supporting the product’s success rate.

Either way, if you do ride at night, always make sure to have front/back blinking lights and proper reflectors on both wheels. Staying on bike lanes, wearing florescent reflective clothing and always wearing a helmet will also ensure better safety.

(via thecreatorsproject)

Currently Trending

Teale Coco Designs Empowering Accessories Inspired By Occultism, Fetish, And Human Anatomy

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Lunar Eclipse” catsuit, “Lucifer” fullbody harness, “Starlight” bloomers, and “Lunar” bralette. Photo: Tasha Tylee | Makeup: Brianna Rourke

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blackmass” fullbody harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blk Magic” thigh garter, “Cult” bloomers, and “Widows Peak” crop. Photo: Taygan Bassi

Teale Coco - Fashion

Left: “Lucifer” fullbody harness and “Starlight” bloomers. Right: “Cult” bloomers, “Coven” bralette, and “Demonic Possessions” shoulder harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco is a Melbourne-based designer, photographer, and international model who has crafted her own dark and fascinating brand of handmade accessories. Inspired by occultism, fetish, and human anatomy, Teale’s designs are characterized by powerful statement pieces influenced by occult symbols — such as the pentagram and sign of the triple goddess — in addition to harnesses that mold to the body in provocative ways. As a synthesis of dark themes and alternative culture, Teale’s work is a holistic approach to fashion, one that melds personal identity with empowering aesthetics.

“Fashion is art,” Teale wrote in a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay. “I don’t have boundaries with what I create, and I set no limitations. […] Human anatomy is one of my biggest influences. The shapes, sizes, lumps, bumps, bone, flesh: everything is derived from a natural source — even our technology today was first inspired by the mystery that is nature.” And, referring to how her “Medusa” full leg harness is an evolution of the garter (a time-honored fashion item), she goes on: “I am expanding these traditions and creating something unearthly.”

At the core of most subcultural fashion is a dissenting spirit that seeks expression beyond societal norms and limitations. The same energy drives Teale’s work as she endeavors to create pieces that foster individual empowerment. Following designer Yohji Yamamoto’s perspective on the seemingly paradoxical beauty of black — a “modest and arrogant” “color” that says “‘I don’t bother you, don’t bother me’” — Teale’s versatile pieces are both assertive and romantic, and can be hidden under clothes or displayed over top (Source). Furthermore, the harnesses are gender neutral and made to adapt to all body types, placing no restrictions on who can wear them. “I want people to love themselves, feel good, wear what they want to wear, and not judge themselves,” Teale wrote, explaining how body positivity was important to her project. “It’s not about what other people think about you, it’s how you feel about yourself — and my designs are here to help liberate you.”

Teale Coco the Brand is a passionate project that is destined to go far. In just over a year, after transforming her Etsy store into its own company, Teale’s work has gained an impressive, international following. All of the styling, designing, editing, creative direction, makeup, and social media are currently done by Teale herself, with a team of artisans sewing the designs. Check out the brand’s website, Facebook page, Tumblr, and Instagram to learn more. 

Currently Trending