Get Social:

Carly Janine Mazur Paints Nude Figures In Emotional, Metaphorical Settings

Repose - Metamorphosis (2015)

Repose – Metamorphosis (2015)

Cupid's Target (2014)

Cupid’s Target (2014)

Unearthed - Metamorphosis (2015)

Unearthed – Metamorphosis (2015)

Turmoil - Metamorphosis (2015)

Turmoil – Metamorphosis (2015)

Carly Janine Mazur is a Connecticut-based artist who paints portraits of realistic nude figures in metaphorical, emotional settings. One woman surrenders her heart to a monster; another is feverishly overcome by black, smothering roots; and another meditates deeply as shadows slowly arise around her. Each of Mazur’s portraits have an almost mythic or esoteric quality; using nudity and abstract forms together to unearth spiritual experiences, Mazur captures scenes of rapture and agony that transcend the limitations of the corporeal body.

Resonating with Mazur’s expressive content is the artist’s own experience of creating it. Several of the images here are from Mazur’s Metamorphosis series, which is currently being exhibited at the Arch Enemy Arts gallery in Philadelphia. Characterized by organic imagery and dark, flowing forms that both embrace and overwhelm the figures, this series teeters on the edge between life and death, ecstasy and despair, chaos and serenity. For Mazur, Metamorphosis involved finding balance in her process, and allowing art and emotion to flow naturally—although the journey was uncertain.

“While working on Metamorphosis, I broke, and I’m not afraid to admit it,” Mazur explains in her Artist Spotlight. “I was completely cut down by the challenge of creating a visual theme. My first attempt at pushing through the ‘cocoon’ left me disheartened and doubting my ability to create. The first piece in the series, then titled ‘Limbo,’ fell apart emotionally and compositionally, and I felt crushed by looming deadlines, although still a ways away, dominating the horizon.” (Source)

After a few days of creative purgatory, Mazur realized that “metamorphosis is an organic process, following a limited set of rules and drawing from a limited set of resources.” By setting these boundaries, Mazur was able to let her artwork and energies flow between them. The result is a series of stunning portraits that embody both intensity and clarity, bound seamlessly together by their style, theme, and emotional resonance.

Metamorphosis will be on view until August 30th. Visit Mazur’s website and Tumblr to view more. She also has a YouTube channel where she uploads time-lapse videos of her paintings. (Via Hi-Fructose)    

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

The Many Shapes And Sizes Of The Love Drug: Dean Zeus Colman’s Sculptures Of Ecstasy Tablets

Dean Zeus Colman - Cast PlasterDean Zeus Colman - Cast PlasterDean Zeus Colman - Cast Plaster

Dean Zeus Colman’s artwork has given us his drug of choice, which is hand molded Ecstasy tablets cast in plaster. His series Love Is A Drug includes sculptures of Ecstasy tablets of all different shapes and sizes that actually exist in real life. Knowing this bit of information, it is shocking to see how many different designs and even logos are imprinted on these little tablets. There are more common images like smiley faces, money signs, and stars on the drug, but a few have images that may be of surprise to you. The Mortal Combat symbol, the UPS logo, and even the beloved Bart Simpson’s head has also been included in this eclectic variety of Ecstasy tablets.

Zeus, based out of London, grew up involved in a subculture where Ecstasy tablets were often present. The drugs were readily available, not surprisingly, while working in the Rave scene. Zeus has long been working as a street artist and has been tagging since the 1980’s, which has influenced and led to the making of Love Is A Drug. Other sculptures of this artist reflect this lifestyle and draw off inspiration from graffiti such as his three-dimensional graffiti text constructed from glass and wood.

Love Is A Drug is currently on view at Prescription Art in Brighton, England, which focuses on street and graffiti art. The exhibition features thirty-six limited edition, larger than life Ecstasy tablets. (via The Creator’s Project)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Brad Kahlhamer Combines His Native American heritage And Post Punk Sensibilities In His Explosive Paintings And Sculptures

BRAD KAHLHAMER - painting 5 BRAD KAHLHAMER - painting 4

BRAD KAHLHAMER - painting 1

Brad Kahlhamer uses his Native American heritage and post punk urban culture to paint large abstract symbols across canvas’ and create his own spiritual dolls. He is interested in culture and identity and through his art is building a world where he fits in. His artwork has an undertone of darkness meets the real world. A “third place” as Brad Kahlhamer calls it, where two opposing personal histories meet.

His paintings are filled with totems, poles, teepees, hawks and weaves combined with images from different cultures. It unveils an obsession for his ancestors and the modern life he is living. He is influenced by rock music and multiculturalism which is reflected in his paintings by the tone of colors and the display of the elements throughout the canvas. The dolls are a logical continuation of the artist’s train of thoughts.

Brad Kahlhamer has decorated the dolls with recycled and organic elements; feathers, bicycle-tire inner tubes, his own hair, discarded clothing, rope, and leather. Originally, the dolls are Katsina dolls, cottonwood carvings of Katsinam, spiritual beings in the Hopi religion. Respectful of the amalgam his pieces might have caused in terms of culture appropriation, the artist, always gave credit to the origin of his influences. The tribe he has created is carefully constructed. Blending geometric shapes, nails and wired legs to the essence of the Katsina dolls, the artist is empowering the individuals and blurring the lines between multiculturalism and abstract modernism.

Currently Trending

Makeup Artist Tal Peleg Transforms Her Eyelids Into Animals, Famous Paintings, And Emotional Messages

Foxy Eye

Foxy Eye

Girl With The Moon

Girl With The Moon

The Little Prince

The Little Prince

Salvador Dali

Salvador Dali

In a combination of makeup art and illustration, Israeli artist Tal Peleg has turned her eyelids into expressive canvases. Peruse her collection and you will see eyes and brow bones masterfully transformed into emotional landscapes, various animals, and renditions of famous paintings and movie scenes. Each piece is painstakingly achieved using a combination of eye shadows, watercolors, eyeliners, and tiny brushes, taking hours to perfect. The result is a series of artworks—ephemeral in nature—that express identity and creativity in unique ways.

“Makeup is an amazing form of art, and I use it in order to make my eye tell a story,” Peleg wrote on Bored Panda. “Inspiration is all around me, and I give my own unique artistic interpretation using makeup. It can be inspired by emotions, movies, fairytales, animals, food, important social matters, and more.” (Source)

The eye is the proverbial “window to the soul”—the lens through which our inner states become visible to others. It is incredible how the mood of Peleg’s ice-blue iris appears to shift depending on the artwork and narrative that surrounds it. As mentioned above, the topic range of Peleg’s eye-art is vast; some explore scenes of child-like innocence, while others convey important social messages, such as the pain and isolation of bullying, and the spiraling, dark coils of depression. With incredible detail and sensitivity, Peleg has captured these themes and experiences well, with her eye as the deep locus that communicates their significance on intuitive, emotional levels.

Visit Peleg’s Facebook and Instagram to see more. (Via deMilked)

Currently Trending

Kate Shaw Creates Hypnotic Landscapes Out Of Poured Paint

Kate Shaw - Acrylic, Resin, and Mixed Media on BoardKate Shaw - Acrylic, Resin, and Mixed Media on BoardKate Shaw - Acrylic, Resin, and Mixed Media on BoardKate Shaw - Acrylic, Resin, and Mixed Media on Board

Kate Shaw captures the magnificence and mystery in nature in her hypnotizing landscapes created from acrylic paint, glitter, powder, and resin. Each piece exudes the undeniable and powerful force that the rolling hills and mountains hold. Shaw portrays monumental forms of beauty, such as glaciers and cliffs, in an environment swirling with vibrant color. These mesmerizing, whirling hues are created from pouring paint, letting the movement of the color form naturally. Although these paintings show nature and landscapes, they look anything but natural. The colors Shaw has chosen are completely abnormal. Her mountains drip with oranges and pink while her trees rage with rich reds and blues.

There is a strange balance of natural and artificial brilliance captured in Kate Shaw’s work. Her use of different types of materials creates different textures and reflective surfaces that transform the landscapes even further. They are like environments from another planet, just as incredible as they are unfamiliar. Kate Shaw’s landscapes conjure conflicting emotions of growth and manipulation, showing natural beauty with synthetic qualities. Kate Shaw explains her intentions behind this dichotomy.

“My practice aims to convey ideas of nature, alchemy and cycles of creation/destruction. The paintings and video works deal with the tensions and dichotomies in the depiction of the natural world and our relationship to it. I am concurrently exploring the sublime in nature whilst imbuing a sense of toxicity and artificiality in this depiction. My intention is to reflect upon the contradiction between our inherent connection to the natural world and continual distancing from it.”

Her captivating work will be on display at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco in February of 2016.

Currently Trending

Micaela Lattanzio Unveils A Site Specific Installation Of Hundreds Of Pieces Of Sky Covering The Floor Of An Art Space

Micaela Lattanzio - Installation 1 Micaela Lattanzio - Installation 5

Micaela Lattanzio - Installation 6

A site specific installation made out of hundreds of hand cut hexagonal sky photography pieces laying on the sand-covered floor of a gallery. Michaela Lattanzio is presenting her new artwork ‘SandCloud’ and previous other key pieces from her Fragmenta collection at Bi-Box Art Space in Italy. The artist’s Fragmenta mosaics of human portraits where already pushing the limits of traditional photography, an intricate work described previously on Beautiful/Decay.

By fragmenting the images of a sky, Micaela Lattanzo invents a new metaphorical language. The perception of the elements, as we know it, is deflected to another kind of appreciation. As we observe and identify the small pieces, we slowly move away from judgment and can explore the full meaning of this representation. That is the purpose of the artist’s work; influence the brain to follow an emotional contemplation.
To symbolize the fragility of such a process, Micaela Lattanzo uses paper, a mean that can easily be reduced to dust and evaporate in the sky.

The intangible sky opposed to the solid sand creates a dichotomy materializing on one hand the body and on the other hand emotional thoughts. Our eyes go back and forth both elements the same way our need to create a connection does with art or human relationships.

Micaela Lattanzo’s retrospective will take place starting September 4th 2015 until October 4th 2015 at Bi-Box Art Space in Biella, Italy.

Currently Trending

Flora Borsi Superimposes Vintage Photographs Of The People Of Detroit Onto Its Current Day Ruins

borsi4 borsi3 borsi2 borsi1

Hungarian artist Flora Borsi’s latest work was fueled by the emotions she felt after visiting Detroit. The artistic examination of architectural and infrastructural ruin has proven to be a topic of interest for many a creative person. From the ruins of once bustling institutions comes an idealization of the past that in turn triggers reflection on the future. She explains that she was “saddened by the state of abandoned buildings and factories”. She transferred this feeling into her latest project, simply entitled “Detroit”, which is a clever series of photos where she places old photographs of people in Detroit on top of photos she took during her time visiting the city.

Her photos include couples roaming the streets, children ice skating, and factory workers manufacturing tire parts. She merges what she sees as a very alive past and a very much less alive present. Through her splicing of past and present, she addresses the melancholy associated with the decay of an urban setting and the nostalgia of a metropolis in its heyday.

Her series reaches beyond a simple display of sadness and neglect, and the clashing of the city’s past and recent present provides strong grounds for reflection on the idea of rebirth. By doing this, she has somewhat created her own vision of urban decay in a way that is both bleak and hopeful.

Currently Trending

Valerj Pobega Intertwines Bondage With High Fashion In Detailed, Art-Driven Couture

Valerj Pobega — Fashion Valerj Pobega — Fashion Valerj Pobega — Fashion Valerj Pobega — Fashion

Valerj Pobega is an Italian-born, LA-based designer who brings powerful imagery and detail-focused art into the world of fashion. Crafted entirely by hand, Pobega’s pieces comprise unique cuts and painted fabrics instilled with hybridized, subcultural references. Her style could be described as sophistication with a resounding edge, and operating under the mantra “you’re wearing Art, and Art is timeless,” Pobega seeks to reinvigorate couture as a creative outlet that defies the doldrums of mass production and consumerism (Source).

Featured here is Pobega’s “Bondage Collection,” which debuted in Spring/Summer 2010. In true trendsetter fashion, Pobega introduced the runways of high fashion to fetish-inspired wear when it was still largely underground. In bold contrasts of black and white, each ensemble is somberly daring and awakens the imagination like thunder. One of the main inspirations for this collection was Nobuyoshi Araki’s controversial bondage photography, as seen in the ropes, tassels, and braids adorning and harnessing the models. The lightweight, kimono-style couture also resonates with a Japanese influence. Pobega, however, is careful not to isolate such references, and has seamlessly blended these aesthetics with a dark, Western punk style.

Another inspiration behind the “Bondage Collection” was the movie Trainspotting and its soundtrack—in particular, Iggy Pop’s “Lust for Life,” which accompanied the runway show. With their shadowed eyes and unlaced shoes, the models reflect a subtle state of dishevelment. All of these influences come together into a narrative that Pobega composed to inspire the collection, which she described for Beautiful/Decay:

“I thought of [the Trainspotting influence] as very connected with the Araki theme as the movie depicts the life of a group of friends addicted to drugs—and if you think about it, drugs addiction is really like being in bondage, tied up in ropes, unable to move or make decisions.”

In oscillating images of power and powerlessness, the originality of the series derives from a compelling synthesis of its influences and details. The runway show was likewise as impactful, with a male dancer clad in one of her hand-painted gowns closing the event with a dramatic pirouette. With Pobega, shock value and emotion are integral to exploring the capacities of fashion as an embodied art form.

Pobega’s unique couture has been widely recognized, attracting the attention of celebrities such as Madonna, Selena Gomez, and Ozzy Osbourne. Her work has also been featured in the publications Vogue, Elle, Bite, and more. Visit her website to view more of her compelling and art-driven collections.

Currently Trending