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Jacopo Rosati’s Felt Collage Illustrations

Venice, Italy-based artist/illustrator Jacopo Rosati does these felt collage illustrations that are really cool. Rosati, whose clients include -among others- Wired Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and Geico, has a nice sense of color. Each piece really pops and the felt adds a unique texture to his work. The images are so subtle, but they communicate everything they need to through the artist’s clever, economical character design. The superhero piece (above) is especially great. (via)

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Miniature Movie Sets Crafted With Such Detail You Won’t Believe Your Eyes

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As crazy as it may seem, there was a time when computers did not exist. Before the days of digital manipulation tricks, also known as CGI, the magic of the movies was created by hand. Instead of “copying and pasting” in explosions and aliens, hundreds of artists would gather to create miniaturized life-like movie sets. These sets would then allow filmmakers to generate a larger-than-life type scene on a more manageable sized scale. They act as little doubled false realities, that on film, become truths.

The crafted preciseness of these rooms are absolutely spectacular. As you peek through the models, you’ll find an endless amount of detail that will leave you in awe. Not only are the replicas life-like through spot on accuracy in scale and space, but each room has carefully selected fixtures and decorative touches, grounding them in time. With windows that look as if they have had their own personal histories, kitchens fully equipped with tiny utensils, a library thats perfectly slight disorder allows it to seem genuinely used, these miniatures truly own their connected to reality. What further enhances the believability is the way light floods through these places, positioning them in certain moments of day a certain time of year. To think about the amount of work and craftsmanship that used to go into the production of a film is mind-blowing.

CGI has completely changed the nature of what it means to make a film; something that was once a collaboration of artists and craftsmen talented in skilled labor, now falls to a man behind a machine. These sets are a reminder of how much we have truly changed, how our association with the word skill has moved away from a physical sense and has fully been relocated to a cyber one.

You can find over 100 of these look-a-like rooms and over 300 props at the Musée Miniature & Cinéma in Lyon. (via Web Urbanist)

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Rodrigo Arteaga Merges Science And Art With His Handsome Maps Created With Bacteria

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There are many kinds of maps to help find our way in this world. Political, road, and topographic maps may be familiar, but in Chilean artist Rodrigo Arteaga’s hands, maps are made by and of cultivated fungi. Meticulously grown and preserved, Arteaga’s maps are simultaneously science lesson and aesthetic object.

“Convergence” is a mapamundi (map of the world); an installation composed of filamentary fungi in glass containers. The propagation these fungi propagated represented the surface of the earth. The other components of the work were elements that evidence the research process: photocopies of mycology books, pencil drawings that imitate the growth of fungi, sketches, photographs, and Petri dishes with laboratory tests.

A second project, “Atlas de Chile Regionalizado,” consists of 15 glass containers in which different types of filamentary fungi represent each one of the 15 regions of Chile. The living organic matter of the fungi is delimited and cut in the shape of each region, then preserved under resin.

These interdisciplinary works involve people from interdisciplinary areas of thought. Their beauty is in the relationship between art and science; order and chaos.

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Modern Celebrity PhotosTransformed Into Vintage 1920’s Mugshots

 

New project from Michael Jason Enriquez, who brought you Cholafied a couple months back. Enriquez, still a student in advertising, is quickly developing a strong track record within the visual realm. It seems that he is able to communicate his pop culture impressions with enormous clarity and ease. Pretty unique quality of execution from someone in such an early stage of his career. Big ups.

The new series is entitled Mugshot Doppelgangers. Enriquez has taken some fairly ubiquitous celebrity mugshots and inserted them into an early 20th-century context:

…Our current mugshots of the rich and famous are plastered with every article, and blog these days, but look uninspired and cheap.  That’s why I wanted to bring our celebrity mugshots back to a time when love and care was taken to compose a more artful mugshot – back to the 1920’s…

…We’re so used to seeing celebrity faces on our tv, on blogs, and we even know what their mugshots look like. The tacky looking mugshots we have today are in stark contrast to the mugshots taken in the 1920’s. Vintage mugshots have an eerie beauty to them that’s lost in current mugshot photography…

Definitely someone to keep tabs on in the future. See more Celebrity Mugshot Doppelgangers after the jump.

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Clare Mallison

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There’s a beautiful simplicity in Clare Mallison’s illustrations; a bare sweetness, and sometimes sadness, to her style that makes me smile.

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Caktus & Maria’s Fluid Watercolor Portraits

Italian illustration duo Caktus & Maria bring a powerful and fluid flair to their juicy watercolor portraits. Each piece is frozen in time like a river of color that was stopped exactly at the precise time that a face emerged out of it. (via)

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Connie Wong

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Open your eyes and clean out your ears, kids.  Connie Wong has some fresh artwork to accompany your Wednesday morning.  Ear wax and boogers have never been cooler.

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Melissa Cooke Drawings of beauty, fantasy, And Violence

Melissa Cooke’s accomplished powdered graphite on paper works explore themes of beauty, fantasy, violence, vulnerability and identity, with the artist casting herself as subject in a myriad of thematic scenarios.

 ” I take photographs as I paint and pour liquids onto myself, using my face as a canvas.  The photo shoots reference the practice of drawing and painting; then the final graphite drawing references photography.  The boundaries between the mediums are broken down and the processes are interwoven.

The images depart from the framing of traditional portraiture.  The viewer is not given an entire bust of the subject; rather the frame zooms into up-close sections of the face.  The cropping pushes the face to the surface of the paper, making the figure more ambiguous.  Flesh becomes abstracted: obliterated by paint on the skin, distorted by the eye of the camera lens, or smeared by the glass of a Xerox machine.

Photographs are used as inspiration for drawing and mark making.  The drawings are made by dusting thin layers of graphite onto paper with a dry brush.  The softness of the graphite provides a smooth surface that can be augmented by erasing in details.  Gestural marks are apparent, while still creating dimension.  Textures are given precedence over portraying a likeness to the figure.   The act of drawing becomes the focus.”

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