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Graphic Paper Cut Outs Transformed Into Street Art

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Street Artist Joe Boruchow is an expert at manipulating positive and negative space.  His work intertwines stark black and white graphic cut outs, often cleverly playing each off the other.  Boruchow’s street art compositions are made up of simple but powerful images, wheat paste posters in public spaces.  He interacts with his work, much like a stencil or etching, indeed, frequently creating corresponding cut paper pieces of his posters.  While adeptly balancing positive and negative space in each poster, Boruchow also give careful attention to the postivie and negative space of the city.  His posters can be found filling empty areas of doorways, windows, and walls.

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Miguel Chevalier’s Interactive Magic Carpets

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You may remember when we first featured French artist Miguel Chevalier’s work back in September for his Paris construction tunnel light installation and musical collaboration with Michel Redolfi. Revisiting traditions of Islamic art, namely mosaics and carpets, Chevalier and Redolfi have joined forces again to create a similarly interactive digital/sound project earlier this month at the Sacré Coeur church in Casablanca, Morocco. From April 3-6, “Magic Carpets” transformed the church’s floor into an interactive user interface featuring graphics evolving along with the movements of visitors. The digital light display features generative graphics that multiply, divide, grow, and transform, reminiscent of cellular and organic systems. Visitors’ shadows become a part of the light and graphics display, allowing users to become a part of the installation. The effect of combining organic and digital technologies renders the installation almost psychedelic, enhanced by the accompanying ambient music by Redolfi. To view the installation in action, be sure to check out Claude Mossessian’s video. (via design boom and inhale mag)

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Albert Reyes & Group Show @ Guerrero Gallery

 

Guerrero Gallery in San Francisco is opening a big group show with tons of new work by some of your favorite artists such as graffiti icon Mike (Giant) LeSage, B/D featured artists Ryan Travis Christian and Cody Hudson, and even yours truly. If that’s not enough Albert Reyes will also be presenting a new body of work in the galleries project space! A sneak peak of the work in the show, press release, and dates after the jump.

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Lee Jeong Lok’s Glowing Tree Series Gives Off A Palpable Sense Of Spirituality

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There is something intanglibly familiar about Korean artist Lee Jeong Lok‘s photoseries “Tree of Life”. Perhaps it is the beautiful, postcard-quality of the surroundings, or that Lee has truly tapped into a cross-cultural metaphor for the spiritual in using an illuminated tree as a subject. Lee has mentioned in previous interviews that he considers himself a deeply religious person, and attempts to give his photographs a palpable sense of spirituality. Says Lee,

“I tried to depict emotions and spiritual imagination in that the sceneries inspired rather than recreated the scenery itself. … Every myth talks about another world that we believe co-exists with the real world we look at and live in. The other world has a powerful presence that we cannot see.” 

Lee, who grew up in the Korean countryside, often depicts an intimate bond with nature in his work. In his Tree of Life photoseries, the photographer admits to using installation, sets, scenes and digital manipulation to create his constructed scenes of illuminated trees in spiritually-emotive surroundings. Lee continues,

But it is very important to me that my end product is photography. I believe there exists another, invisible world within the world we can see with our eyes. If I were to draw an image of this parallel universe, it would become a mere fantastical illustration. However, by using photography the end result is very different; it retains the essence of our experience of reality, while simultaneously conveying a sense of the hidden realm that exists therein.”

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Yueh Alex Lu

The fact that my name is also Alex explains my natural affinity for this work, but that isnt the sole explanation of the genius of Yueh Alex Lu.

 

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Stephan Tillmans Captures The Final Flickerings of Televisions Turning Off

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The work of German graphic designer and  photographer Stephan Tillmans combines a fusion of new and old technology. Outdated cathode-ray televisions are turned off to reveal a strange but familiar geometry, which are then captured with modern, high-resolution cameras and techniques. This kind of CRT technology is no longer used, and the images the Tillmans collects are equally rare, as each is a finite moment that can almost certainly never be repeated. According to Tillmans, his work is a “photographic series of old tube televisions taken at the very moment they are switched off. The TV picture breaks down and is abstracted to its essential element: light. Each of these photographs is from a different TV, but it’s also the length of exposure, timing, and time the TV has been running before the photo is taken that affects the results.”

Tillman’s recent portfolio is broken up into two categories – the Luminant Point Arrays,  (seen above) made from color television sets, and the darker, more stark shapes of the Luminant Screen Shapings which are taken from black and white televisions (seen below). The more recent Screen Shapings lack color and some variation, but also have a more delicate, line-based visual strength. (via booooooom)

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Honoring The 1980s With Sacred Geometry

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There is something fantastically unworldly yet alluringly familiar about Amy Joy Watson’s bright sculptures. Whether it’s a drooping bow or a glitter-filled orb, this Australian’s artful structures feel like a 1986 birthday party, translated or abstracted by a video game of that same era: there are no soft edges, only the disjointed illusion of it.

To make each piece, Watson stitches or glues together watercolor-stained balsa wood, occasionally adding a tasteful Gobstopper here, or helium balloon there, to garnish her own primal sense of whimsy and sacred geometry, resulting in a somewhat spiritual monument to another imaginative age and time.

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Sigga B. Sigurdardottir

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Sigga B. Sigurdardottir‘s illustrations definitely deserve a second look. She describes the drawings as, “They simply exist to demonstrate a situation or a state of mind.” Whether they look like people or animals, these ghostly characters are haunting illusions that morph into shadows or pose as menacing figures. They fit in or belong in no particular space, yet their haunting presence is impossible to ignore.

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