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Richard Sweeney’s Intricate Paper Sculptures Are Incredibly Made Without Glue

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Looking like a set of architecture models for a Gaudi building, Richard Sweeney‘s paper sculptures are organic, poetic, intricate, and mostly made without the aid of glue or tape. Taking his inspiration from the shapes and forms that occur in nature – like clouds, mounds of snow, he folds paper into beautiful geometric pieces. Not confined to working on a small scale, Sweeney also constructs wonderfully complex forms that hang from the ceiling to the floor.

He was recently part of a show called Above The Fold, and is a part of a group of talented modern day origami masters. Taking the ancient art of paper folding to a new level, Sweeney and his contemporaries are redefining the limits of what can be done with paper. Biological structures, and the essence of form and function are Sweeney’s inspirations. He talks to Design Museum more about what motivates and inspires him:

As I have mentioned, architecture is a great inspiration to me, but aside from the man-made, I am also inspired by natural forms. It is not so much the organic shapes, but the means by which they are generated that interests me. It makes great sense to borrow from elements from biological structures, as these forms demonstrate the pinnacle of material, structural and functional efficiency. (Source)

Like a true designer, Sweeney is giving the humble piece of paper new life and function. You can even attempt his paper folding technique at home by watching this short tutorial here. (Via Exhibition-ism)

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Casey Richardson’s Digital Sculptures Look Real But Only Live In Computers

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Casey Richardson

These impressive digital sculptures were created by Melbourne-based graphic design student Casey Richardson. Richardson uses 3D software to illustrate installation scenes that could be mistaken for real-life sculptures. Richardson implements simple and oft-used sculptural subjects, but places them in new contexts. His images are bright and cheerfully colored, though the subject matter itself usually conveys the opposite.This creates an interesting juxtaposition of form and content within each scene’s composition. Most intriguing to me is the way Richardson has implemented wall color in each imagined installation. This has me wondering when I’ll start seeing more gallery walls painted as part of a sculptural installation, and how installation design and implementation will continue to be affected by advances in technology. (via art ruby)

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Arielle Coupe

arielle coupe birdadterbirth1 Arielle Coupe creates work that feels as if it were a scene from an avant garde horror film.  It’s always a good feeling to be creeped out and intrigued simultaneously.

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Pearl C. Hsiung

Pearl C. Hsiung creates really awesome Manga inspired cosmic scenes of fantasy worlds with enamel on canvas.  Hsiung was born in Taiwan in 1973 and lives and works in Los Angeles.  You can catch some of her work on display at the Steve Turner Contemporary art gallery from October 16-November 13, 2010.  Check her out!

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A Day In Decay: San Francisco (Part 2) Guerrero Gallery

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I had been hearing some buzz about Andres Guerrero’s new space so I thought I’d head over and check out Weight Perception, a group show curated by SF’s own Andrew Schoultz.

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Dan Cretu Transforms Real Bananas Into Sculptures By Carving Intricate Geometric patterns Into Them

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The trendiest bananas are far from looking yellow. Dan Cretu doesn’t let them stay that way. He gets them ready to strike a pose by handcarving and handpainting each one of them with geometric patterns, textures and vivid colors. No second degree, no political message; just the brilliant idea of admiring creative and colorful images.
Strangely enough they leave a taste in the mouth, the one of bananas of course, but with a twist of positivity and spontaneity. So many ideas to embellish a fruit, as we scroll down the “Bananametric Series” we can imagine that if the fruit was genetically modified by the artist we could end up with a large pallet of banana varieties.

Dan Cretu masters his art: by blending food sculpture with photography he offers the world a new idea of conceptual design. In his previous work he put together orange and lemon peels to make a camera. Due to its fragile nature, this process has to be done quickly as the fruits deteriorate. The peels, arranged in an unexpected environment rather than in a kitchen let’s say, generates in this case an eco-art visual identity.
That’s the purpose of Dan Cretu: “all objects and things around us daily are possible subjects for me. The challenge is to transform a common object that we don’t notice anymore into something unusual, alive, and appealing.”

Follow Dan Cretu on Dan Cretu Facebook and order printed high quality photographies on Etsy. (via Demilked)

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HelloMe’s Critical Objects Blur The Line Between Art And Furniture

Critical Objects is a personal initiative of Berlin-based graphic design firm, HelloMe. The project began as a series of explorations that thrive on not having any particular goal. The project consists of a series of objects that transcend a blurry line between artistic sculpture and functional furniture. The beauty of the project is that it remains unknown to the user if these things should really every be used, touched, sat on, or turned on… We have a small collection featured here, so be sure to check out the full series at Critical Objects.

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These Aren’t Your Grandma’s Embroideries: Alaina Varrone’s Erotic Stitching

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Alaina Varrone is a embroidery artist who, according to her, was born to a family of weirdos and storytellers. She uses this natural inclination to tell tales using thread which are often explicit and erotic in nature. We see naked men and women, sexual acts, and general kinkiness stitched into cotton fabric. Sometimes, Varrone will use delicate-looking floral patterns that add to the delightful absurdity of her work.

Typically, embroidery is seen as a craft, and an activity that’s a favorite among grandmothers (although it does have a thriving community of younger folks). It’s content is generally seen as inoffensive and family-friendly. Varrone has turned this convention on its head by sewing scenes that that are anything but. Her characters go after their desires and fantasies, creating an amusing juxtaposition between how we’re used to seeing embroidery versus all of its possibilities. (Via Juxtapoz)

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