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Sunglasses That Give You LSD-Induced Visuals Without The Drugs

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Perhaps you want to make your walk through the park more interesting; or maybe you’re dying to sit on the bus and immerse yourself in Jimi Hendrix’s Electric Ladyland while gazing at a psychedelic horizon. Thanks to Hungarian designer Bence Agoston’s “Mood Sunglasses,” you can indulge in a pseudo-trip at your leisure. Accompanying the glasses’ half-circle, 3D-printed frames are six lenses, each imprinted with Moiré patterns that filter blue, green, and red light. When layered and rotated in their frames, the lenses create the visual experiences of LSD without the drug itself.

In discussion with Fastco Design, Agoston explained how the Moods work. “Because each color filters the incoming lights differently, and the patterns can overlap each other or leave blank fields, the new view is completely random and twisted.” Agoston also has versatility in mind, just in case you need a break from your simulated LSD journey: “Mood can also be used with clear lenses, for everyday living.”

Agoston goes on to describe the suggested use of such “hallucinogenic” sunglasses. “The ideal situation for use is during travel, when people listen to music, just looking out the window and watching the ever-changing sights, in perfect harmony with the music. The shape is designed with the aim of simplicity and distinctness, as if the wearer belongs to a kind of subculture” (Source). In short: the Moods are prescribed for anyone who enjoys (or needs) a taste of altered reality. (Via Fastco Design)

Check out Agoston’s work on Behance here.


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Ben Butler’s Dizzing Maze Playground Created With Thousands Of Sticks

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Hard to believe that a gigantic in situ installation made out of thousands of poplar sticks was built from scratch. Yet, that is the work process of Ben Butler. He started to play with the sticks and came up, as he kept going, with the abstract shape of his piece. Exploration is what guided the artist to assemble the rigid squared voids among the organic impulsive sculpture.

He compares it to hiking in the forest and to realize that nature doesn’t adapt to the human scale. There is no limitation. Through this process we, humans, discover forms and need to engage in order to interact and build meaning. The voids created within the sculpture needs to be filled to complete the work. That is the dialogue Ben Butler wants to encourage between the piece and the viewer, let him make his own discoveries and introspections.

“The art shouldn’t be about art, you bring your owns ideas to it”. Ben Butler is not concerned by fhe final result. It doesn’t matter if it has nothing to do with his starting vision, his process of creation never follows the initial impulse. However, he is comforted by repetitive patterns and rigid parameters. He plays with methodology, in one direction and once the threshold has been reached it’s where a new characteristic emerges and enters an abstract zone that has nothing to do with the original components.

Ben Butler’s “Unbounded” installation is now showing at the Rice University Gallery in Houston, Texas until August 2015. When the exhibition is over, the 10,000 sticks will be disassembled and the sculpture will no longer exist as it was set up in the gallery. (via Design Boom)

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Artist Interview: Marci Washington

Marci Washington is an artist, based in Northern California. Her lightly rendered gouache and watercolor paintings depict the interiors and exteriors of creepy houses, reed-bordered pitch swamps, forbidden correspondence, and nocturnal, aristocratic cannibals who always seem to maintain a certain measure of grace amidst unsavory conditions and elements. To me, it’s always appeared as if such figures are pausing for her to paint their portrait while the world crumbles around them. A macabre fashion shoot staged amidst the apocalyptic environs of a world without sunrises, Washington’s delicate, detailed work is a rich stroke of contrast between dark and light; brutality and delicacy. I caught up with Marci in-between her various travels and projects and, in keeping with her reputation for graciousness, she answered some questions and brought us up to speed with her career. (Images courtesy of Rena Bransten Gallery.)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Outside The Box

Some people are so creative, original, and unique that they have to constantly tell you how creative, original, and unique they are all the time. This entertaining video is about them.
Watch the full video after the jump.

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Priscila De Carvalho’s Majestic Brazil

Paintings and sculptures collide and meld together in the installations of Priscila De Carvalho.

“The visual form of my installation originates in memories of my childhood home—an island in the southern part of Brazil—a serene setting surrounded by the sea, with majestic palm trees and lonely houses scattered along the shore, and crowned by a vibrantly colored sky at dusk. The content is fueled by the writings of Maria Manuela Margarido and Alda do Espirito Santo and personal memories of my country’s political resistance to colonialism. My lifelong social and political awareness began at an early age and, ultimately, found its way into my art in the form of figurative narratives that portray the joy and resilience of the human spirit confronted with social and political hardships. Specific imagery in By the Sea (parrots, coconut palms and the evening sky) was taken from Margarido’s poem Nightfall, which reflects on the disjunction between childhood dreams and adult realities and reminds its readers to dream high.”

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Matej Peljhan Uses Photography To Help Boy With Muscular Dystrophy Skateboard, Swim, And Dance

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Photographer Matej Peljhan created these vividly imagined images with the help of twelve year old Luka.  Luka suffers from muscular dystrophy.  The muscle disease has severly limited Luka’s movement to mostly his fingers making even the most basic task difficult or impossible.  Luka worked with Peljhan to create photographs of fun activities that would usually be impossible for Luka to take part in.  Using simple props, Luka would be positioned on the ground as Peljhan shot the photographs from above.  The resulting images form a heartwarming series titled The Little Prince.  [via]

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Wyatt W.’s Death in Rainbows

The idea of finding and re-sharing images on the internet is nothing new, but sometimes someone does it well enough it’s worth talking about. Canadian artist Wyatt W.’sDeath In Rainbows tumblr is not the usual loosely connected (or completely random) mess, it is broken down into meticulously curated sets of fascinating images. This care and direction create an experience that is both focused and full of surprises.

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Sandra Osip Sculpts Ruined And Piled-Up Houses Inspired By Detroit’s Decay

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In a dark series of sculptures titled Broken Dreams, Brooklyn-based artist Sandra Osip captures the decline and decay of suburban Detroit. The works are inspired by Osip’s memories of the city: the streets she roamed as a child, the corner stores she visited, and the neighbourhood—now destroyed—that surrounded her former high school. She sculpts the skeletal husks of houses that are burnt down, collapsed, and decaying, evacuated of all life and purpose. In more abstract renderings, Osip has created “junk heaps” of urban ruin, crushed-up buildings that represent entire neighbourhoods left to the cruel forces of time and neglect. In the following statement, Osip explains the deeply personal inspiration for the series:

“Recently I visited my childhood neighborhood in Detroit, Michigan, and to my disbelief my house was no longer standing; neither was the corner store where I bought my penny candy, nor my friend’s house down the street, nor the empty lot I used to ice skate on. This is now an empty wasteland and overgrown by nature. The day after my visit the news reported that a block away from where I lived they found two decomposing bodies. The news stated at least a dozen bodies in twelve months have been found in this abandoned and neglected part of the city.” (Source)

Nostalgia is a painful concept in these sculptures; instead of comforting childhood origins, Osip is left with rootless memories, and a sense of “home” that’s deteriorating and forever changed—haunted, even, by literal images of death in the form of human bodies. “Many of my fond memories have now vanished,” she goes on to write, explaining the pain of having part of one’s personal history obliterated. She approaches the series with a profound awareness tinged with irony; one work, titled “Beautiful Homes and Gardens,” incongruously depicts a stack of cadaver-like houses. However, by consciously reworking her attachments to the now-ruined streets of her youth, Osip’s work demonstrates a courageous exercise of healing through the release of the past.

Visit Osip’s website to view more of her works.

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