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Astounding Sculptures You Won’t Believe Are Made Of Cast Paper

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It is difficult to believe that the astounding, realistic sculptures of husband and wife duo Allen and Patty Eckman are cast from paper. Inspired by cast paper techniques of mid-20th century Mexico, the couple has developed and trademarked a unique process called the Eckman Method®. Pouring paper pulp instead of bronze into silicone moulds, they are able to produce lightweight sculptures with an astonishing level of detail. Allen’s work centers on the history of the American West and Native American civilization, content that blends seamlessly with Patty’s focus on wild flora and fauna.

Allen, who himself is of Cherokee descent, seems to pick up where 19th century American bronze artists like Hermon Atkins MacNeil or James Earle Fraser left off. Echoing the sentiment of these early settlers to the West, Eckman portrays the vanishing Native American population with dignity and reverence. Many of their sculptures are colossal, looming above viewers with magnificent authority. Others are miniature, precious to behold. The Eckmans capture scenes both active and pastoral with equal attention to detail; the cowboy, blazing ahead on horseback, lasso in hand, is seen with as much clarity as the native American hunter, who rests for a moment with his equine companion, absorbing the sights of the natural world. Like living specimens of times and cultures too rarely recorded by history, mothers and children dance in historically-accurate clothing.

In their stunning visual work, the Eckmans are able to merge a new, innovative process with subject matter as timeless as our country, breathing new life into the cannon of work created by great American sculptures of the past. (via BeautifulLife)

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Tintin Cooper Photography Weaving

 

Bangkok-born artist Tintin Cooper‘s collages weave different images in popular media, such as sporting figures, to cut away the different faces and obscuring their identity. The themes of her work highlight society’s obsession with celebrity, and undermines this illusion by forming work that seems to shatter her subjects from within. More after the jump.

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Studio Patten’s Typographic Illustrations

Madrid based design studio Patten pushes typography and playful layout to the forefront of all their work regardless of whether they are creating bold digital illustrations that jump off the page or delicately drawn fashion illustrations by hand.

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Dance Of The Disfigured: Monica Piloni’s Resin Sculptures Are Disturbingly Elegant

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Monica Piloni - resin, plastic, hair

Sculptor Monica Piloni creates surreal, multifaceted versions of the human body from resin, hair and different plastics. Whether it is a triptych of herself, melded at the hips, with multiple breasts, three legs and conjoined heads, or a double tailed horse, she has the ability to make something gruesome seem commonplace. In her work Ballet Series, she assembles body parts to look quietly surreal and unassuming, yet elegant. Figures lie on beds, as if exhausted from a recital, literally collapsing on themselves. Piloni places her models in a graceful manner, toes pointed and muscles tensed as they would be mid-dance. The poses and gestures of the bodies conjure up the drama of French Romantic oil paintings, where humans were depicted expressing a whole range of emotions with their bodies.

In her work Concave & Convex, she piles dismembered body parts up on themselves to form a human landscape. Similar to Louise Bourgeois’s ambiguous sculptural forms, Piloni fragments the human shape into abstraction, and in the process dismantles her, and our, understanding of identity.

Her sculptures are captivating because of their simplicity and fluency of movement. Even her more challenging pieces (modified women with exposed genitalia) have a gentle symmetry that reassures, rather than revolts. See more of her beautifully gruesome work after the jump. (Via Sweet Station)

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Aaron Moran

Aaron Moran’s geometric reclaimed wood sculptures look like prehistoric wooden meteors that came from an ancient petrified wooden planet.

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Claudiu Cândea’s Anatomies Exposed In The living 1

 

We’ve all seen photographs of cadavers with the skin pulled back to see the anatomy or accidentally clicked on a medical tv show and see a birthing video but  Claudiu Cândea’s beautifully drawn and incredibly grotesque drawings depict this in the figures of young girls, beautiful (and very alive) ladies laying about casually with their skin pulled back to reveal every muscle, vein, and organ. Disturbing? Yes. gorgeous artwork? Absolutely!

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Calcuator collector

657_1229729768 is a Japanese website that collects an assortment of random stuff. Like this adorable 1976 Texas Instrument one called ‘Little Professor’. It makes me want to think numbers are cute.

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Lauren Semivan’s Black And White Photography Digs At Our Primitive Nature

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Lauren Semivan’s black and white photography raises the dead, feels rich with ritual, and sullen from the earth. To say it is simply an abstract psychological expression would be too easy. There’s something else happening here that is magically archaic, and it’s not just the finely tailored compositions that carefully, yet seemingly casually, dig at our remains by arranging drawn fragments, bodies, vegetation, bones, and string, against a sparse backdrop. This “something else” is movement or play not just in the environment, but as or with the environment, a dreamy surreal fade that lingers.

Technically, each image is a true representation of not just what collects, but how the collection becomes. Shot with a purist sense of photography’s past, Semivan uses an early 20th century 8 x 10″ view camera and, without digital manipulation or any touch-ups at all, develops prints from a scanned large format negative. The ephemeral result, interestingly, pushes on our own anthropological or archeological impulses as a species– asking us to engage and connect with our ancestors, creatively, scientifically, and divinely.

Of her work, Semivan states, “In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course. Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space. Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. Observatory elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds. Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings.”

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