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Sarah Illenberger’s Strange Fruit Transformations

Defining one category for all the work of Sarah Illenberger is no easy task. What initially sounds quite abstract, in reality, is mostly practical in that her creations are not generated on a computer but rather by meticulous handwork, sometimes incorporating the most mundane materials.Out of her studio in Berlin, Germany Illenberger takes everyday fruits and vegetables that we find in grocery stores and transforms them into humorous sculptures that look like other mundane objects that one may find in their home. The results will make you laugh and think of a disco next time you see a pineapple in aisle 6.  (via)

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Christian Weihrauch

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Grown up crayon drawings- need I say more? Christian Weihrauch manages to transform those old Crayolas (and sometimes colored pencils) into beautiful drawings!

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James Loveday

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Photographer James Loveday produces beautifully polished images for both fashion spreads and his own personal projects. What strikes me about Loveday’s work is that, regardless of whether he’s photographing golden perfection or morning-after mayhem, his work maintains a richness that you can almost reach out and touch.

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Hybrid Futures: Amy Congdon Uses Tissue Engineering To Grow Fashion Accessories

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Amy Congdon is a designer and researcher whose speculative “Biological Atelier” project brings fashion into the laboratory. The question driving her work is as follows: “What role will textile design play in the creation of biological products of the future?” (Source) Can we use tissue engineering to literally (and sustainably) grow fashion products, without creating waste, and without killing animals for their parts? As Congdon describes in the above video interview with Dezeen, her prospective collection would include a broach grafted onto the skin, and a collar attachment grown from an “an exotic mix of scales and leather.”

By combining textile design with tissue engineering, the possibilities for fashion products are virtually endless. “You could engineer specific properties into them,” Congdon explains. “They could be water repellent, or you could engineer the colour into them so you’re not having to dye them.” Furthermore — and here we enter the realm of a maybe-not-so-distant sci-fi future — Congdon hypothesizes that we could create hybrid materials, textiles deriving from combinations of organic tissues that have never occurred in nature.

While the conceptual pieces are beautiful, they may produce a sense of unease for some. Fashion, after all, usually involves commodities we put on and over our bodies, not ones that we graft on, and certainly not those made of materials birthed in a laboratory. This creates fascinating questions for the future of our bodies (and our consumer habits) — we could conceivably become hybridized by our fashion. As Congdon writes compellingly on her website:

“With one of the most controversial sets of materials becoming available for manipulation, i.e. our body, and those of other species, it could be argued that future fashion is grown from the ultimate commodity.” (Source)

Whether the concepts behind the “Biological Atelier” project fascinate or unnerve us (or both), Congdon points out the necessity for such speculative work. “We really need to acknowledge that we are living on just one planet, so we have finite resources,” she explains in the video. “So we really need to think about new ways that we might produce materials and products.” Such research, after all, may one day mean less suffering for the people, animals, and environments harmed by commodity production.

Visit Cogdon’s website to learn more. (Via Dezeen)

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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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Street Artist No Touching Ground Depicts Social Conflict In Greece, US, And Worldwide

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Traveling all over the world, street artist No Touching Ground wheat pastes compelling imagery amidst various cities architecture that adds depth to the context of our time and place. Recently, in Greece, he posted work concerning their social political climate under the title “Ingredients Of An Uprising”. In one of them, an Axe body spray bottle, re-worked to say “Anarchy for Him” floats over other graffiti on a busy street.

No Touching Ground creates a nearly optical illusion as his work is so photorealistic that it blends into its surroundings in an uncanny way. He began by working around images of animals from the wild, and people dressed up like animals. His work has since become more political, ranging from symbolic elements indicative of social tensions, to portraits and quotes of protestors met at a demonstration. In Seattle he voiced many of the emotions surrounding the tragic death of John T. Williams at the hand of a Seattle police officer. His work is aesthetically lush and important for our social consciousness.

A rather mysterious artist, No Touching Ground has work all over the world. Alaska, Seattle, South America, Europe, and now Greece, there is no saying where his work will show up next.

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JOSE LUIS CARRANZA

I can’t find much info on the work of Peruvian painter Jose Luis Carranza but I sure do love these fluid and juicy bugged eyed paintings.

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Hasisi Park

Hasisi Park
Hasisi Park’s photos are at times crude yet tragically endearing. She’s worked with clients like Converse, various fashion lines for Seoul Fashion Week, and has also been featured in a couple fashion/art magazines. I love Hasisi’s info page, as the items listed there have almost nothing to do with usual bullets info pages and CVs, but instead reveals happenings that perhaps impacted her creative work. Though it’s difficult to truly understand someone through looking at a webpage, I feel like I’ve become to feel her work a little bit more.

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