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Everyday Lorraine Loots Creates Intricately Detailed Paintings The Size Of Your Fingernail

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Looking at these paintings out of context, you might not know that they are very small. In fact, sometimes these works are no larger than a coin or someone’s fingernail. Artist Lorraine Loots says that she creates “paintings for ants,” but you wouldn’t necessarily know it at first because of their intricate details. They have as much visual information as paintings 10 times their size.

Every day, Loots posts a new small picture to her Instagram, @lorranieloots. It’s always of an impossibly tiny subject and the caption features information about what they are and what we’re looking at. Loots realistically-rendered cars, landscapes, boots, birds, statues, and much more. The small scale is a nice twist on what we’ve seen before, and here the short explanation helps, too. “Paintings for ants” is an amusing thought, and one that’s entirely possible given the size.

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Artists Turn Giant Trees In The Forest Into Humorous Watchful Faces

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Dear Human is the artistic partnership between Jasna Sokolovic and Noel O’Connell.  After meeting at a residency in Denmark the two began collaborating.  Their work is based on common beliefs the two share and each project incorporates their respective strengths.  Noel has material expertise and pays attention to detail where Jasna possesses great improvisational sensibility and an explorative nature.

Together their work draws inspiration from different environments.  They appreciate places and spaces that allow them to experiment with materials, as well as other people, such as designers, architects and artists.  Often their projects offer an alternative perception to overlooked everyday landscapes by revealing the hidden potential of places and objects.  Ultimately they hope to inspire consciousness and curiosity.

The Sentinels were one such project.  In part of the forest the duo regularly visits there used to be a grove of grand Douglas firs.  Over a century ago they were cut down.  At the time the technique to cut such giant trees was to chop wedges into them and embed horizontal planks to stand on, so the lumbar jacks could cut above the root line.  Now the remains resemble empty eye sockets that, as the duo says, “longed for an intervention.”  Inserting porcelain eyes into the slots the Sentinels were born and they silently keep watch over the forest.

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Anthony Lepore’s New Wilderness

Interesting series of photographs by Anthony Lepore of visitor centers, rest stops, and information centers found at the edge of wilderness.

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Grizzly Bear Video

Sean Pecknold aka Granchildren recently sent me this lovely video he did for the song “While You Wait for the Others” by Grizzly Bear, an interesting trip through a theater of the absurd, and as the title implies, seems to loosely be based around ideas of the passage of time.

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Michaël Aerts Paints It Black

I love Michaël Aerts black and white sculptures. If black metal bands made art it would look something like this.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Reds

 

Want to see what kind of music video a bit of creativity and $200,a two car garage,  soldering iron, handmade clay molds, christmas lights, and no CGI can produce? If so watch this great promo video for  Reds by Houses directed by LAMAR+NIK after the jump!

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German Activists Target Urinating, Drunken Party Tourists With Splash-Back Surfaces

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

A strange new campaign has started in St Pauli, the party district of Hamburg in Germany. In order to deter drunken party goers who have a habit of peeing on walls, doorsteps, playgrounds and in alley ways, local activists have coated the surfaces in a substance that will change where visitors go to the toilet. This wonder substance is a superhydrophobic coating which causes any substance to hit it to rebound and splash back more than it normally would. Some areas are marked with warning signs, some are not. Most importantly they don’t mean to be unfriendly toward tourists, it acts more as a strong message.

Such a simple, novel idea thought up by a community group will have such a wide reaching impact, and will make a whole lot of local businesses happier, cleaner and a lot less stinky.

The group also plans to roll out a program in which people using the restroom at bars can get a stamp on a special card that can be redeemed for a shot on the house after the sixth restroom trip. One thing is for certain: if you pee in public in St. Pauli, “urine” trouble. (Source)

The campaign is a tongue-in-cheek approach to a serious issue for the area. And proves that St Pauli can defend itself. So far the idea has made waves around the internet and perhaps will encourage other areas to do the same. (Via Bored Panda)

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Studio Visit: The Paintings Of David Hornung

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David Hornung makes paintings from both oil and gouache.  He paints quiet simple, small houses located in fenced fields, bucolic scenes of nature, solitary women and men, memento mori, snakes and birds, paths and walls.  Objects in his paintings seem to be a distillation of universal human experiences with the world and among each other.  Some objects are singled out as being important by a kind of twin cloud, the direction of light, or glowing patches of color.  The paintings are beautiful executions of color theory, which makes sense because David wrote the book on color theory “Color: A Workshop Approach.”  His subject matter hovers between observation and the symbolic, and he refers to Philip Guston’s Alphabet series with plain respect, and like Guston, David was reluctant to talk about image-based thinking.  We walked through Brooklyn on the way get some lunch, and David said that painting is hard to talk about because the ideas come out of working with images, that the process gives painters their ideas, which is a kind of reversal, because for most people who work with ideas – the ideas generate the process.

You can see David Hornung’s work at the John Davis Gallery in Hudson NY from May 23rd to June 16th.

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