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Suzannah Sinclair Vintage Nudes

I’m loving the vintage feel of Maine based painter Suzannah Sinclair’s washed out nudes. It’s odd that someone who lives in one of the coldest parts of America would paint these nostalgic images of young beautiful naked girls frolicking at the beach. Perhaps Sinclair longs for some of the amazing California sunshine that I take for granted 365 days a year.

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Now You Can Get Married In A Wedding Chapel That Looks Like A Rainbow Filled Kaleidoscope

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If you’re thinking about getting married and want to take your vows under a unique environment you can hop a plane to Shanghai China. There a company called Coordination Asia has designed The Rainbow Wedding Chapel modeled after the inside of a kaledeiscope. It takes the classic idea of this creative toy and proceeds to realize it on a larger scale. Using glass, mirrors, and paint in an array of colors it gives couples an alternative to more traditional nuptial environments. It looks super pretty and signifies many different things that have changed in our culture. For one how artists today are looking to affect on a broader scale and influence many opposed to a few. It also shows how traditions in our time are now flexible.

The chapel definitely has a new age feel. The architecture is circular signifying life’s continuous flow. The beautiful colors make for aesthetic bliss and no wonder someone would think to design it for that special day. You can adjust hue and choose how many of them you want reflected on the walls. Altogether 3,000 glass panels and 65 colors make up the chapel.

Based in Shanghai, China, Coordination Asia continues to be an innovator in glass design. The company recently curated an exhibit entitled “Keep It Glassy” showing large scale installations using the material.  (via mymodernmet)

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Lutz Bacher And The Celestial Handbook

Lutz Bacher‘s recent exhibition at San Francisco’s Ratio 3 included the series The Celestial Handbook: offset book pages taken from found copies of amateur astronomer Robert Burnham Jr.‘s 1966 handbook of the same title. Each page — there are 85 in the series — is individually framed, forever capturing timeless subjects in a dated format. What we see are images of things that surpass the power of imagery with captions that can’t help but fall short in describing things that surpass the power of language. (via)

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Someone Made A Living Replica Of Vincent Van Gogh’s Severed Ear

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We all know the story of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, an organ that the artist is rumored to have severed from his own head in a fit of lovesick madness. For her project Sugababe, the artist Diemut Strebe has recreated the living ear of the legendary Post-Impressionist. Teaming up with scientists and using an advanced 3D printing technique, Strebe constructed the true-to-life organ from a sample of the late artist’s DNA found in an envelope that he had licked in 1883 and live cartilage from the ear of Lieuwe van Gogh, a grandson of the painter’s brother. The replicated ear, now on view at The Center for Art and Media in Karlshruhe in Germany, is kept alive by being suspended in a solution laced with nutrients.

Strebe’s installation includes a microphone into which viewers can speak. The sound is then carried to the ear, which hears speech as a crackling noise that is projected through speakers for all to listen. For the artist, Sugababe is a physical manifestation of Theseus’ paradox, wherein the ancient Greek hero was asked if a ship would remain the same if all its individual parts were replaced with new ones. Here, Strebe asks if this clone of an ear might in fact be considered the same ear worn by van Gogh. Tragically unable to respond the viewers who speak to it, the organ seems startlingly alien. Though it is composed of the same elements as the original ear, it lacks the humanity and the romance we ascribe the artist whose molecular biology it shares.

Given the tragic history of the artist, Strebe’s work carries with it a sense of loss and poignancy. Where the living van Gogh was unappreciated— reviled, even—in his time, here even his tiny organ is preserved with the utmost care, his body transformed into a valuable work of art in and of itself. (via Design Boom and The Daily Beast)

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Nicolas Rivals Uses Light To Paint Arresting Portraits

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In a series titled Light Rorschach, photographer Nicolas Rivals paints with light in dark spaces. Using a torch light and a camera with a long exposure, the artist draws and contours an arresting image. When I look at these photographs, I instantly see a face. But, Rorschach can refer to a couple of things. There is the Rorschach inkblot test, which is a psychological test. Additionally, a character, the anti-hero in the graphic novel Watchman has the same name. Knowing this and studying Rival’s work, his interpretation seems to be a combination of the two influences.

According to his website, Rival wants us to question the reality of the photographs.  Could these things possibly exist? And, if they do, what are they?  Rival insinuates that the beings in in Light Rorschach exist, referring to subjects as masks, meaning that they have some sort of identity. And, they observing us as we look at them. He writes:

…turns observer and observed through the eyes of spirited but ultimately see some of your own personality and therefore yourself. Cross between the work and the viewer as an introspection looks these masks seem to shout.

“Tell me what you see and I’ll tell you who you are.”

If the eyes are the window to the soul, then the soul of these light masks are serious and demand your attention. The lines of the painted light frame the neon blue, red, and green discs.They definitely aren’t human, and seem like they belong in a sci-fi story.

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Brandon Jan Blommaert

Any information regarding the details of Brandon Jan Blommeart’s existence can not be found- his current info page is a self reminder to put up some kind of blurb and maybe an animated gif. I like these sculpture/collage things he did with recycled material, though I can’t tell if they are made in a 3D modeling program or out of physical materials (a comment on his in-progress post mentions the former). These abandoned beasts struggling in the wild remind me a little of characters from Miyazaki’s Nausicaa.

Edit: I just got an email back from Brandon (who lives in Canada) with some details breaking somewhat his shroud of mystery. These sculptures are indeed made out of garbage and created for a public arts commission. The final forms will be large vinyl prints wrapping the side of a building. Can’t wait to see photos of when they’re actually up!

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Judi Harvest Crafts Intricate And Delicate Glass Beehives

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Miami-born but aptly based in both New York City and Venice, artist Judi Harvest creates intricate and fanciful glass sculptures.   Ranging from gnarled bears to purple martians, her work varies in both subject matter and style. However, since 2013, Harvest has paid special attention to the natural realm, creating delicate and wispy glass beehives.

Comprised of Murano glass and wire, each hive sculpture is naturalistic in color and realistically rendered. Like the pieces themselves, the process behind the work is extremely intricate and requires a great deal of skill:

Each vessel begins with a hand-rolled cylinder of chicken wire, wire found in Venice and characterized by a finer module than that of the hive sculptures made in New York. Glass is blown into the cylinder, protrudes between the wires, and balloons delicately above the top. Some vessels retain wire embedded in their surfaces. Amber glass is the base color in which Harvest mixes gold or silver leaf and other additives that affect opacity, reflectivity, and hue. Sprinkling the hot surface with powdered glass pigment and reinserting the vessel into the furnace creates a rough yet dainty texture that resembles a dusting of pollen. (Denatured: Honeybees + Murano catalogue, Venice, 2013)

In addition to the exquisite aesthetic of the sculptures, a personal interest in honeybees also contributed to the creation of this series. On top of her artistic career, Harvest is a beekeeper, finding inspiration “in the form and behavior of the honeybee, the hexagonal wax cells of the honeycomb, and the rounded volume of hives in nature”—influences that are undeniably present in the ornate detail and beautiful composition present in her Bee Series. (Via Sweet Station)

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Fortunato Castro Dresses As His Mother In Stunning Exploration Of Female Eroticism

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The 27-year-old Fortunato Castro grow up listening to his mother recall vivid memories of her youth in El Salvador. Now a photographer, Castro returns to images of his mother at his age. The art theorist Roland Barthes once wrote about his search for his late mother within photographs of her; in the series Some Girl, Some Where, Castro takes it a step further, animating the vintage photographs by dressing and posing as his mother.

In the poignant series, Castro doesn’t intend to impersonate his mother in a literal sense; rather, the images read as a son seeking to understand his mother and her youth by physically placing himself in her shoes. Each image is shot with earnest reverence; every gesture he sees his mother make is carefully mimicked, from the concentrated application of mascara to the self-conscious covering of the chest.

Photographically, Castro sees differences in the images of young women today and of his mother’s generation. The modern snapshots that permeate our culture, he suggests, are more casual and candid; a girl takes a shot of her friends as they get ready for a night out, or a woman sends an intimate selfie to her lover. The photographs of his mother’s youth are more serious and polished, and he conveys that elegantly, acknowledging the viewer in each image and positioning himself with careful deliberation.

The obvious sexuality of the photographs remain touchingly innocent; Castro’s curiosity about his mother’s body reads more like a confessional than an exploitation. He returns to the sensual exploration of childhood, using his own body to navigate his feelings about his mother’s. Take a look. (via NYMag)

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