Photos Of Nude Female Wandering Mansion Grounds Evoke A Surreal Eroticism (NSFW)

Nude Female

Nude Female

Nude Female

Nude Female

Photographer Jeremy Ayer and graphic designer Julien Mercier have been collaborating on a series of photographs titled “Aude” that feature a nude female exploring, or used as a decoration in, a large mansion. In some of the photographs, the female body appears to be on ornamental display, almost doll-like, and contrasted with some of the other objects on display in the mansion. Despite her nude body, the photographs are shot in such a way as to leave the female figure shrouded in a bit of mystery.

“With her pale skin, her slender body, she represents a certain ideology of beauty, as dictated by contemporary magazines. But paradoxically, the raw image remains in a direct visual language, not constrained by any commercial obligations. There is no digital manipulation which would withdraw all of her natural eroticism. In the same process, the statues whth their perfectly carved silouhettes, oppose with her curves left intact. The brutal and frontal lighting, exposes here entire body. But always fleeting, she remains inaccessible to the viewer, out of reach, in height.” (via ignant)

Valerie Hegarty And Three Other Artists Who Have Mastered The Art Of Illusion

Valerie Hegarty

Valerie Hegarty

Fanette Guilloud

Fanette Guilloud

Kyung Woo Han

Kyung Woo Han

Thomas Quinn

Thomas Quinn

Valerie Hegarty’s Alternative Histories was installed at the Brooklyn Museum in one of their Period Rooms.  Hegarty’s site-specific installations toy with a viewer’s perception—they create the illusion that the process of destruction or decay has been accelerated and what we see are the remains of the real artwork.

Thomas Quinn is a Chicago designer who experiments with something called “anamorphic typography.”  When viewed from a certain angle the text looks just right, but when one moves around the text morphs and warps.

Fanette Guiloud is also interested in anamorphic projection and used the method to create a series of photos titled Géométrie de l’impossible (Impossible Geometry).  Only 22-years old, the illusion is impressively successful.  Influenced by artists such as Felice Varini, Guilloud is certainly an artist to keep our eye on.

Creating installations that defy logic and inspire wonder South Korean artist Kyung Woo Han says of the work, “All the facts are relevant. People see what they want to see. One fact can be interpreted in several ways depend on our perceptions. In the opposite, two different facts can be looked the same. My work deals with perception and illusions. Everything we see or what we know is not absolute. I suggest various ways to perceive things with slightly different perspectives.

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Yue Wu Transforms Instagram Likes Into Drawings

instagram likes instagram likes instagram likes instagram likes

Like a lot of us, artist Yue Wu uses Instagram. He “likes” things on Instagram, as we’re supposed to, but takes it one step further. Everyday, he turns those “likes” into drawings. Coming full circle, he then Instagrams the drawing and tags it the source photos. This way, you can click through to the originals. He tags this work as #whatilikedtoday.

These quick, black and white ink drawings are a mash up of a day. They vary in subject matter. Some include what you’d expect, like architecture and animals. Others are more bizarre, including one that has a greco-romanesque statue wearing  protective eyewear, and a dancing skeleton wearing a top hat and holding a cane.

The concept behind Wu’s drawings is relatively simple, but amusing. It also has me thinking about my own Instagram feed. We spend so much time looking (and sometimes mindlessly liking) photos. Wu’s drawings illustrate what stands out in the deluge of images.  What would your #whatilikedtoday look like? (Via Booooooom)

Yusuke Oono’s 360° Handcut Pop-Up Books

Yusuke Oono Yusuke Oono Yusuke OonoYusuke Oono

Japanese artist/designer/architect (and construction worker?Yusuke Oono was thinking beyond flat when she conceived her 3-Dimensional art books. First designing the layouts of each book (which includes titles like Sweet HomeJungle BookIn A Cheese, and a 360° Christmas Book) by hand and with the aid of design programs, Oono then uses a laser-cutter to carve out the highly-detailed dioramas that make up each page of the story. These pages are then bound together, creating a compiled book which more than pops out, but can be read in 360°.

Fitting for an intricate project, these ultra-creative art books are available for purchase, and even more interesting after viewing the dozens of process shots Oono posts documenting her process in intricate detail. (via colossal)

Cyril Crepin Poignant Photographs Of Facial Reconstruction Patients

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Photographer Cyril Crepin creates an extraordinary, poignant collection of photographs featuring portraits of facial reconstruction patients within the confines of the hospital in which they were operated on.

With the help of Professor Bernard Devauchelle, a leading surgeon at the hospital in which these individuals were in, Crepin photographs these subjects in order to celebrate, but most importantly, accentuate these individuals’ self-respect, playfulness and courage  regardless their ‘monstrous’ appearance after surgery.

 “They want to be recognized as human beings. Contrary to what people might say about this series, it’s not meant to be obscene or voyeuristic. Obscenity is to ignore their humanity and their extraordinary courage.”

Crepin’s work is emotionally intense and it is by no means easy to look at. It is sad to say, but many people will have a tough time looking at these just because of the deformities. This consequence is tough to acknowledge, but it is true. It is hard to admit that many of us will be disturbed and disgusted by the appearance of these people, but it is this sole purpose that, I think, runs Crepin’s artistic fuel throughout the creation of this series. The rawness of his subjects’ gaze and the fearless aura they portray is powerful and inspiring… their brilliance transcend the normative ideas about beauty. Their humble controbution to Crepin’s work teaches us that everyone, no matter what they went through or how they look like, deserves a little self-praise and respect.

(via frameweb)

Three Artists Who Transform Origami Into Incredible Fine Art

Pavel Platonov

Pavel Platonov

Marc Fichou

Marc Fichou

Gerardo Hacer

Gerardo Hacer

Russian artist Pavel Platonov experimented with origami because of his inclination toward sharp, angular, geometric forms.  Better known as a photographer who works with a unique and surreal type of portraiture, Platonov’s sculptures have a reflective quality to them, allowing a viewer to learn something about himself while observing the work.  Bizarre and often placed in natural settings Platonov’s pieces allow a viewer to encounter and react to discovering something strange and out of place.

Interested in the idea of a final image juxtaposed with the process of achieving that final image, artist Marc Fichou experimented with the conceptual process of folding, and unfolding, origami forms.  Drawing attention to the way our mind makes the connection between the two contrasting images, which don’t directly or immediately resemble one another, Fichou creates works that are visually compelling, and intellectually engaging.

Born to teenage, Mexican-American gang members, artist Gerardo Hacer escaped to fantasy worlds via the art of origami.  Learning to make paper cranes at some point during his stay in a string of foster homes Hacer combined that outlet with an inspiration found in Calder’s Los Angeles sculpture, “The Four Arches.”  Hacer decided to become an artist and even changed his name, “Gomez-Martinez,” to “Hacer,” which means “to make” in Spanish.  Hacer became a sculpture who creates large-scale origami forms, engaging his original love for origami with his desire to create substantial and impressive works of art.

Kour Pour Recreates Carpets In Every Painstaking Detail

Kour Pour - PaintingKour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting

Taking images from auction catalogs, artist Kour Pour translates intricately-patterned carpets onto paneled surfaces. The multi-step process is labor intensive, not to mention large – his work is 8 feet tall. First, Pour scans in the image of a rug and burns it on a silk screen. Then, he uses a broom to begin his underpainting (the texture gives it an appearance of a textile). Afterwards, he silkscreens the design to the panel and begins the work of painting every painstaking detail. The final step is to use an electrical sander to erase the painted surface and expose the layers of the under-painting. What results is work that looks like an faded, well-worn rug.

Pour is both British and Persian, and when he was younger, his father owned a rug shop in England. His work is tied to this past, as he explains in his artist statement:

Carpets were a part of my childhood growing up in England. I remember my Father’s rug shop, and how he would hand-dye sections of carpets that had faded away, in order to bring them back to their original colours. I felt that in doing this, my Father was making an effort to maintain all their history and meaning, as if he was bringing the carpets back to life. When I first moved to Los Angeles I had feelings of displacement and much like the faded carpets, I too felt a part of my history disappear. I started the carpet painting series and noticed how art and objects could play an increasingly important role in our diverse society. Through making these paintings I am constantly learning more about my background and the rich mix of culture that surrounds me and the carpets.

By recreating carpets, Pour highlights their meaning as object, as well as the implications of their surface design. They signify an object of privilege (as their originals come from an auction catalog), and our commodity-based consumer culture. Beyond that, the patterns of animals and men on horses is representational of globalization, a culture’s history, and more.  (Via Bmore Art and Flat Surface)

Gisene Marwedel Transforms The Nude Human Body Into Surreal Works Of Art

nude human body

nude human body Gisene Marwedel

Gisene Marwedel

Using the natural shapes and contours of the body, German artist Gisene Marwedel transforms the human body into a living, breathing work of art. Marwedel paints finely detailed images, ranging from animals to landscapes to abstraction. She first learned the art of body painting while in India, where she began painting with henna. This skill evolved into a full-time hobby (she has a day job as a speech therapist). Her work depicts scenes of movement and grace with a hauntingly surreal aesthetic. (via mirror)