Get Social:

Mernet Larson

At age 72, Mernet Larson is having her first solo show in new york right now. Her show Three Chapters is slated to be shown in three consecutive bodies of work– Heads and Bodies, Places, and Narratives. The first two have already come and gone, but if you’re in the NY area you should check out her Narratives chapter at the Johannes Vogt gallery before it gets taken down on the 27th . “These works navigate the divide between abstraction and representation with a form of geometric figuration that owes less to Cubo-Futurism than to de Chirico, architectural rendering and early Renaissance painting of the Sienese kind. They relish human connection and odd, stretched out, sometimes contradictory perspectival effects, often perpetuated by radical shifts in scale.” – New York Times (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Michelle Morin’s Natural World

Michelle Morin’s works are beautifully detailed natural scenes depicting flora and fauna. Each of her pieces is full of painted texture, and puts an earthy calm spin on classical animal paintings. As a once professional gardener, she has a unique insight into her subject matter. I think it makes all the difference, don’t you?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Awesome Video of the Day #2: Garuda

Garuda from Andres Salaff on Vimeo.

An animated short film about a young boy in India chasing after his dream. Animated at Les Gobelins in Paris by Nicolas AthaneMeryl FranckAlexis LiddellAndres Salaff, and Maïlys Vallade.

Currently Trending

Haunting Knitted Animal Pelts Draw Attention To the Plight Of Endangered Species

tumblr_n7mn77erzi1qarjnpo6_1280
tiger#70374_05lowres
russiantiger-lowresweb
berlintiger-female-lowresweb

Stretched and bound over wooden frames, the animal pelts of Australian artist Ruth Marshall are so utterly realistic looking that it is difficult to believe that they are not in fact fur and hide. Constructed out of knitted yarn, they compel us to consider the endangered species killed and skinned by poachers and collectors. Though illegal, the devastating skin trade has taken the lives of thousands of tigers in the past thirteen years, leaving only an estimated 3,200 tigers in the wild. Before poaching practices, deforestation, and other damaging factors contributed by humans, there were approximately 100,000 of this magnificent creatures around the globe.

Marshall learned of the plight of wild cat species while working at the Bronx Zoo and the Wildlife Conservation Society, an experience that moved her deeply. With her Big Cat Series, she hopes to provide a sustainable and humane alternative to tiger, leopard, and jaguar pelts. The nuances of each life-sized work is touchingly based on a real animal, whom the artist became acquainted in captive conditions. A few are modeled after skins owned by collectors. The project effortlessly illustrates the value of artisan work, which ultimately could hold higher commercial value than black market pelts.

Here, Marshall transforms a cruel practice into a labor of love. Where animal pelts have come to represent a cruel and grotesque opulence and greed, she introduces knitting, a craft associated with nurturing and care. As a result, her pieces are both disarming and lovely,a refreshing jolt of sustainability and activism. To learn how you can help save the tigers and other animals, please visit World Wildlife Fund and the Wildlife Conservation Society. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Currently Trending

Photographer Ellie Davies Creates Mystical Scenes That Explore Our Relationships With The Forest

Ellie Davies — Photography Ellie Davies — Photography Ellie Davies — PhotographyEllie Davies — Photography

For photographer Ellie Davies, the forest is her studio. Her images are an immersive mix of realism and heightened fantasy. In a mossy clearing, for example, galaxies have been interposed with the landscape like clouds of will-o’-the-wisps, while elsewhere, stars resembling flaxen particles drift down in a column, illuminated by the sunlight. Her landscapes are not only places of mysticism and beauty, but of darkness, as well. Fog and clouds drift amongst the trees like ghostly breaths expelled from the twisted, bronchiole-like branches. In one particularly haunting photo from Between the Trees Triptych (2014), skeletal trees flank a spectral cluster of mist.

Whether glowing bright or cast in shadow, all of Davies’ images reveal a reverence for the forest, as well as her intimate understanding of the way such landscapes have manifested themselves in our cultural imaginations. As she writes in her Artist’s Statement:

“UK forests have been shaped by human processes over thousands of years. […] As such, the forest represents the confluence of nature and culture, of natural landscape and human activity. Forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and magic as well as of danger and mystery. In recent cultural history they have come to be associated with psychological states relating to the unconscious.”

And it is true; all of these cultural legends, practices, and traditions have made the forest — indeed, “nature,” as a concept  — a construction, a story we tell ourselves to try and understand our individual connection with it. We imagine the woods as a symbolic place of “elsewhere” and “otherness,” and this cognitive distancing allows us to romanticize it, fear it, and/or exploit it.

Davies wants to confront us with these fictions “by making a variety of temporary and non-invasive interventions in the forest, which place the viewer in the gap between reality and fantasy” (Source). She creates her scenes in what she calls “small acts of engagement [that] respond to the landscape” — she builds things, creates pools of light, incorporates craft materials such as paint and wool. As I read it, the images have several effects. They resonate with our fantasies about the forest, but at the same time, we recognize their construction, which helps us to perceive that our cultural relationships to the forests of the real world are also constructed. In unveiling such narratives, Davies’ work encourages a more ethical connection to the woods: we recognize “reality” as a series of stories that have been told to us, we sense that we are not truly separate from what we call “nature,” and we accept that we can never fully understand it — an acknowledgment that fosters both respect and peaceful coexistence.

Visit Davies’ website, Twitter, and Facebook page and immersive yourself in more of her stunning landscapes. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Currently Trending

Olafur Eliasson: your chance encounter

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

Danish-icelandic Olafur Eliasson has done it again! “Your chance encounter” is showing at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan. His intent to make his work engaging and relevant in the tailored museum space brings the institution to life. The rooms and corridors are transformed through his use of light, mirrors, shadow, color, wind and fog. Eliasson re-proposes the idea of the art museum as not just simply a building we go into to see art removed from society, but as more of a public space with the potential to engage society and the urban environment. If you’ve had the “chance encounter” with Olafur’s new installation, let us know what you think- was he successful in doing so?

Currently Trending

Julien Maire Is The First Person Ever To Make A Film Without Film

Julien Maire- 3D Printed SculptureJulien Maire- 3D Printed Sculpture Julien Maire- 3D Printed Sculpture Julien Maire- 3D Printed Sculpture

These figures were then attached to slides and, along a conveyer belt, they rotate in front of a projector, illuminating on a screen the moving image of a man digging up earth. Short and sweet, this little ‘film’ shows the man digging and re-digging an eternal hole in the earth’s surface. Maire formulated and completed this project while at an artist’s residency at the iMAL Centre for Digital Cultures and Technology in Brussels. The iMal noted that Maire has skillfully utilized machinery when making his art:

“For more than 10 years, Julien Maire has mastered and used in unexpected ways advanced technologies such as CNC mills, laser cutters, precision optics, etc. Today, 3D printers are naturally also part of his toolbox. For these two new pieces, Julien designed and built all original parts, mechanisms and components using the whole range of machines available at Fablab.iMAL, from Ultimaker and Mendel DIY printers to the laser-based Form1 3D printer.” (Excerpt from Source)

Currently Trending

Josh Podoll

Green

When looking at Josh Podoll’s paintings they won’t give you anything to think about, and that is sort of the point.  My eye gets caught in the air-brushed, optical illusion like, geometric patterns in a sort of empty, humming, awake way.  Josh grew up in Fairfield Iowa – which is the former home of the Maharishi (of Beatles White Album fame) and one of the main centers for Transcendental Meditation in the US.  He is in a show at Christopher Grimes Gallery in LA that opens January 16.

Currently Trending