Get Social:

Dave Collinson

12 Dave Collinson is an artist fresh out of the Australia. His illustrations and motion work are some of the coolest I’ve seen bar far (and he’s only 22.)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Andrew Holmquist

I’m loving the explosive mix of gestural abstraction and slowed  down moments of representation in the work of Chicago painter Andrew Holmquist.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Cyril Crepin Poignant Photographs Of Facial Reconstruction Patients

crepin-cyril-11-182762_full

crepin-cyril-04-182742_full

crepin-cyril-06-182752_full

Photographer Cyril Crepin creates an extraordinary, poignant collection of photographs featuring portraits of facial reconstruction patients within the confines of the hospital in which they were operated on.

With the help of Professor Bernard Devauchelle, a leading surgeon at the hospital in which these individuals were in, Crepin photographs these subjects in order to celebrate, but most importantly, accentuate these individuals’ self-respect, playfulness and courage  regardless their ‘monstrous’ appearance after surgery.

 “They want to be recognized as human beings. Contrary to what people might say about this series, it’s not meant to be obscene or voyeuristic. Obscenity is to ignore their humanity and their extraordinary courage.”

Crepin’s work is emotionally intense and it is by no means easy to look at. It is sad to say, but many people will have a tough time looking at these just because of the deformities. This consequence is tough to acknowledge, but it is true. It is hard to admit that many of us will be disturbed and disgusted by the appearance of these people, but it is this sole purpose that, I think, runs Crepin’s artistic fuel throughout the creation of this series. The rawness of his subjects’ gaze and the fearless aura they portray is powerful and inspiring… their brilliance transcend the normative ideas about beauty. Their humble controbution to Crepin’s work teaches us that everyone, no matter what they went through or how they look like, deserves a little self-praise and respect.

(via frameweb)

Currently Trending

A Day In Decay: Jesse LeDoux Visits Cult Headquarters

Long time B/D collaborator and mighty stache master Jesse LeDoux stopped by our offices last week to hang out, eat some sausage for lunch and sign a few back issues for you! If you’re not familiar with Jesse’s work he is by far one of the most talented guys out right now. He’s illustrated The Shins Chute Too Narrow album (and got nominated for a Grammy for it!) as well as countless illustration projects for Suicide Squeeze Records, Target and a whole lot of other brands. If that’s not enough Jesse also shows and sells his work all over the world. So I guess what I’m trying to say is “he’s kind of a big deal.”

We have a 5 copies of our Archive Book and 9 copies of B/D Issue: M signed by Jesse so get to the shop and snatch them up before they sell out!

P.S. In case you’re wondering Jesse has been rocking that stache way before all you hipsters thought it was cool. Check out the image after the jump which shows him sporting it way back in 2006 at the Archive show.

Currently Trending

We Are In The Age of Wizards


One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.

The fact that the minds eye can watch in rapid succession a forest turn from barren winterland to the growth of spring clearly means we have become Gods of The Earth. Anyways, happy New Year’s Eve! Watch the year pass in ways only Sorcerers have known.

Currently Trending

Photographer Ellie Davies Creates Mystical Scenes That Explore Our Relationships With The Forest

Ellie Davies — Photography Ellie Davies — Photography Ellie Davies — PhotographyEllie Davies — Photography

For photographer Ellie Davies, the forest is her studio. Her images are an immersive mix of realism and heightened fantasy. In a mossy clearing, for example, galaxies have been interposed with the landscape like clouds of will-o’-the-wisps, while elsewhere, stars resembling flaxen particles drift down in a column, illuminated by the sunlight. Her landscapes are not only places of mysticism and beauty, but of darkness, as well. Fog and clouds drift amongst the trees like ghostly breaths expelled from the twisted, bronchiole-like branches. In one particularly haunting photo from Between the Trees Triptych (2014), skeletal trees flank a spectral cluster of mist.

Whether glowing bright or cast in shadow, all of Davies’ images reveal a reverence for the forest, as well as her intimate understanding of the way such landscapes have manifested themselves in our cultural imaginations. As she writes in her Artist’s Statement:

“UK forests have been shaped by human processes over thousands of years. […] As such, the forest represents the confluence of nature and culture, of natural landscape and human activity. Forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and magic as well as of danger and mystery. In recent cultural history they have come to be associated with psychological states relating to the unconscious.”

And it is true; all of these cultural legends, practices, and traditions have made the forest — indeed, “nature,” as a concept  — a construction, a story we tell ourselves to try and understand our individual connection with it. We imagine the woods as a symbolic place of “elsewhere” and “otherness,” and this cognitive distancing allows us to romanticize it, fear it, and/or exploit it.

Davies wants to confront us with these fictions “by making a variety of temporary and non-invasive interventions in the forest, which place the viewer in the gap between reality and fantasy” (Source). She creates her scenes in what she calls “small acts of engagement [that] respond to the landscape” — she builds things, creates pools of light, incorporates craft materials such as paint and wool. As I read it, the images have several effects. They resonate with our fantasies about the forest, but at the same time, we recognize their construction, which helps us to perceive that our cultural relationships to the forests of the real world are also constructed. In unveiling such narratives, Davies’ work encourages a more ethical connection to the woods: we recognize “reality” as a series of stories that have been told to us, we sense that we are not truly separate from what we call “nature,” and we accept that we can never fully understand it — an acknowledgment that fosters both respect and peaceful coexistence.

Visit Davies’ website, Twitter, and Facebook page and immersive yourself in more of her stunning landscapes. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Currently Trending

Interview: Deb Sokolow

debsokolow_interview
Deb Sokolow creates a vertiginous world of invented narratives. Her large-scale, ink on paper installations are hung in a kind of methodized-madness that call to mind police investigations bulletin boards, a mad scientist’s chaotic formulas and revelations, or the bedroom of an obsessive-compulsive conspiracy-obsessed fanatic. Sokolow leads viewers into the tangled web of an information-saturated schematic, leaving viewers at once disoriented and exhilarated. Sokolow talked to us about her creative process and sent us a bunch of behind-the-scenes shots, including her “research binders” detailing subjects such as “Ghosts, Email Scams, Pigeons & Squirrels.” Full interview after the jump.

Currently Trending

Swarm Of Eating Flies Used To Create Abstract Paintings

John Knuth painting7John Knuth painting2

With the help of a huge swarm of flies, John Knuth transforms decay into creation.  Flies have long symbolized death and rot in art as well as popular culture.  In medieval times, for example, it was popularly believed flies were born out of carcasses rather than eggs as larvae.  Knuth, though, emphasizes the flies productive role in the larger cycle of life and death.  He creates his work by first feeding the flies water mixed with sugar and paint.  The flies largely digest their food outside of their body, Knuth’s flies doing this directly on the canvas.  While digesting, each fly leaves a small mark of pigment, a small piece of the larger record or the swarm.  Check out the video to see Knuth’s process and more of his finished paintings.

Currently Trending