Get Social:

TYLER VIPOND Turns 2D To 3D

Londoner Tyler Vipond’s work plays mostly with space and depth created out of formerly 2D surfaces. Bridging the space between sculpture and painting, his work leaves you with a feeling of tension and intricacy while still feeling almost effortless. I particularly love his series “A Collapse” whose pieces are almost reminiscent of deconstructed origami.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Daniele Del Nero’s Miniature Models of the Urban Landscape are Covered in Real Mold

“After Effects” is a “series of architectural scale models” by Italian artist/designer Daniel DelNero. The models are “constructed with black paper covered with flour and a layer of mold to create the effect of old abandoned buildings.”

My purpose is to talk about the sense of time and destiny of the planet after the human species through the sense of restlessness which abandoned buildings are able to communicate.

First of all, I’m seeing at least four different colors of mold going on with these. That variety alone is impressive. And his positioning and construction of the work is right where it needs to be. See more miniature, decayed urban scenery after the jump. (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Baby Was A Black Sheep

Picture 5

We received a ‘zine today from one of our previously featured photographers, Elle Perez. He even sent us a very sweet thank you note in which he offered to buy us coffee if we are ever in town. The images in the ‘zine are from his series Ghettopunk. Incredibly striking shots! It’d be cool if Elle made postcards of them…I’d love to mail some out to my friends.

Currently Trending

Photographs Turn Hong Kong Streets Into A 2D Video Game

Christian Åslund

Christian Åslund Christian Åslund

Swedish photographer Christian Åslund realized that the city streets of Hong Kong looked like a giant video game while hanging out on a friends rooftop. So with the help of a few fun loving friends, his camera, and walkie talkies he orchestrated this playful and disorienting photo series that reminds us of the golden days of video games where Super Mario was king and the Power Glove was all the rage. (via)

Currently Trending

Stephanie Davidson’s Internet Piles

Stephanie Davidson makes digital collages out of everyday objects. This may sound like an overly simple concept but her selection of objects and their arrangements are both bizarre and humorous. The  Cornrow pile after the jump is by far my favorite.

Currently Trending

Ikea Style Instructions To Assemble Your Favorite Monsters

harrington- ikea illustration

harrington- ikea illustration

harrington-illustration3

harrington-illustration4

Black and white line illustrations, no written instructions, umlauts scattered like rose petals, that smiley cartoon guy—this certainly looks familiar. Illustrator Ed Harrington has subverted the ubiquitous directions sheet for his “Ikea Instruction” series. In Harrington’s world, it’s not streamlined Swedish furniture that’s being assembled, but monsters, killers, and Edward Scissorhands.

The clever illustrations make use of all of Ikea’s standard elements: the illustrated pieces, the bold sans-serif font, the crossed-out warning images. The Vörhees requires a simple assembly of one very large knife, one hockey mask, and one Allen wrench, whereas the Edvard needs 14 units of two different types of scissors, a heart, and hand removal. So far the DIY instruction sheets include Brundlefly from The Fly, a Human Centipede, Jason Voorhees from Friday the 13th, Edward Scissorhands and Pinhead, the Cenobite leader from Hellraiser.

Merging two incredibly popular, and incredibly different, pop culture genres makes this series work. Who could be next in the flat pack? Perhaps a small striped shirt, overalls, and an axe. Who wants to build Chücky?

Currently Trending

So You Think You Can Paint?

How the hell did this lil 7 year old get so damn good at painting? Fucking baby einstein videos!

Currently Trending

Women Confront Their Body Insecurities In Empowering Photographic Series By Neringa Rekasiute

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

While the work of Lithuanian photographer Neringa Rekasiute ranges from surreal scenes of fantasy to eccentric portraits, each photo illustrates a prevalent theme of her oeuvre: an admiration and appreciation for the female form. Thus, it is no surprise that Neringa has teamed up with writer, journalist, and actress Beata Tiskevic and communications specialist Modesta Kairyte to create We.Women, a female-centric photographic series.

Inspired by theories of feminism and discouraged by Lithuania’s apparent and prevailing cult of beauty, Neringa, Beata, and Modesta imagined We.Women as an empowering response to the impossible standards of beauty projected onto women.

Using Beata’s Facebook page as a platform, the trio invited women with self-esteem issues to assist them with their project by partaking in a harrowing task: standing before a mirror, shedding their clothing, and allowing their bodies and consequent reactions to be photographed.   The results—twelve black-and-white photos accompanied by a personal memoir written by each woman—are captivating and relatable, with the heartaches at hand spanning “anorexia, bulimia, breast cancer, vitiligo, depression, fat-shaming, and skinny-shaming,” as well as additional mental health perils and even cases of domestic abuse.

Deemed by Neringa as “a healing experience,” We.Women has undoubtedly aided the creators in their objective to spread awareness and, subsequently, to bring women together: “I just want women to feel united,” Neringa divulges, “I want us to feel bonded.” (Via Bored Panda)

Currently Trending