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Alicia Martín’s Cascading Book Installations

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín

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Alicia Martín (formerly featured here – as well as in our Best of 2012) has kept busy this year, expanding on her signature style of cascading book installations that we first saw in BiografíasEach installation begins as a wire and aluminum structure, to which hundreds and thousands of books are attached, creating the illusion of waterfalls of pages and spines wrapping around objects, wrapping around themselves, and pouring from windows and underneath walls.

In works such as Singularidad, the Madrid, Spain-based artist focuses her waves of books into a more circular shape, resembling a vortex rather than a waterfall. Playing with the idea of a black-hole, or naked singularity, the collective swathe of books consumes itself, rather than bursting forward. In Contemporaneos, Martín plays with the idea of the books being the background, the support, or what’s behind the object, pouring out of (or cracking through) a wall – engaging in a dialogue with more indoor, site-specific contemporary installation. However, Martín continues to re-imagine her waterfalls, with newer pieces expanding on previous work’s pouring from buildings, as well as running down streets, through windows and around trees, with pages blowing in the wind at each amazing installation. (via mymodernmet)

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Teresa Lim Documents Her Travels With Embroidery

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A young designer named Teresa Lim uses a centuries old tradition to remember her trips to exotic places. Instead of a shutter and lens she threads needle and yarn to embroider her memories. The idea first evolved when she wanted more than just a photograph or postcard as a memento. She used her training and expertise as a textile designer/illustrator and concocted the embroidery idea. The labor involved in the project satisfied Lim’s taste and was a positive way to imprint these unique places into her memory.

The work itself is not much larger than a photograph and round in shape. On her website (teeteeheehee) she shows a picture of the finished piece against the actual subject matter. Most are uncannily accurate and quite beautiful. She chooses an array of colorful, natural destinations to sew which work well with the bold, vibrant yarns. Some of the places she’s embroidered have been Vietnam, Berlin, Prague and Tokyo. She has also done other projects in embroidery which depict girl power topics and are less traditional in the sense of technique.
Embroidery has been in existence since the early 3rd century B.C. Since that time it has changed very little. There are a few different types of stitches and that’s it.
It differs from needlepoint which uses a stiff open weave canvas opposed to embroidery’s soft cloth which requires a loop to create a border. (via boredpanda)

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Jalal Abuthina

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Jalal Abuthina is a photographer with a history as varied as his work. He was born in Dublin but grew up all over the world, drifting between Libya, Greece, Tasmania, Australia, and Dubai. His jet-setting youth and current day job as a real estate consultant in Dubai have obviously informed his culturally charged imagery as well as his interest in clean, architectural lines.

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Craig And Karl

Bold colors, playful typography, and iconic illustrations are the key ingredients that make the work of New York and Sydney based design duo Craig And Karl stand out from a sea of repetitious designers.

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Dan Eckstein Captures The Splendor And Eccentricity Of India’s Hand Painted Technicolor Trucks

Eckstein, Photography

Eckstein, Photography

Eckstein, Photography
  Eckstein, Photography

Dually based in both Los Angeles and New York, photographer Dan Eckstein is no stranger to the inescapable traffic of a bustling metropolis. While travelling across Rajasthan’s highways and byways during a trip in 2011, however, he noticed a striking addition to the thoroughfare: highly adorned, technicolor trucks. Inspired by these shimmering “goods carriers,” Eckstein opted to create his series and book, Horn Please: The Decorated Trucks of India.

In addition to vivid paint and ornately-inscribed text—including the phrase “Horn Please,” found ubiquitously on India’s trucks and designated “the mantra of the Indian highway” by Eckstein—the trucks’ exteriors are encrusted with gleaming lights, images of deities, intricate patterns, and even portraits of pop culture staples. While the trucks boast impressive façades, their interiors are just as embellished; given the exhaustive hours and long journeys innate to this line of work, the drivers seek to be comfortable and, thus, decorate their cabins according to their unique tastes.

While highly individual, the trucks also speak to a specific culture and its highly distinctive aesthetic:

What Eckstein produced is a singular portrait of the subcontinent–distinctly Indian, and a vividly colored reflection of this country in flux between tradition and modernity. Horn Please serves as a psychedelic guide to design in India, from the hand-painted lettering covering the trucks, to the mindboggling use of color, to the specifically Indian patterns and motifs, and a showcase of the visual vernacular of the subcontinent.

Beautiful and jubilant, the decorated trucks of India are truly a feast for the eyes. (Via Slate)

Be sure to pick up your own colorful copy of Horn Please from Powerhouse or Amazon!

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Tadashi Moriyama

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I found Tadashi Moriyama‘s work during Bushwick Open Studios this past June and fell in love with the intricacy and obsessive mark making process that is evident in each ink and gouache work. Each painting is rife with apocalyptic imagery rendered in countless repetitions of a few motifs including waffle-like gridded squares forming architectural structures and tubular wobbly connectors slithering in and out of buildings and bodily orifices.

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Safely Playing On Building Facade – Visual Illusion Installation By Leandro Erlich

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The installations of Argentine artist Leandro Erlich are known to be visually playful.  His most recent installation definitely follows suit.  For Dalston House, Erlich constructed a facade of a three story home which lies horizontally on the ground.  A giant and cleverly angled mirror gives the facade, and those on it, the appearance of being vertical.  Visitors hang from roofs, sit casually perched on ledges, and effortlessly walk down the wall.  Also check out Erlich previously here.

[via]

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Video Watch: I Am Dain- Senior Citizen Street Artist Is Still At It

Brooklynite Gallery has been on some sort of weird hiatus for a while, apparently to focus on making arts related films. Well, they do make good shorts. This is one from a while back when they had an exhibition from collage artist DAIN. So there’s this unassuming elderly guy, right? Well he happens to be a fairly prolific street artist who makes collage work out of portrait photography. Just watch the video. And the next time you find yourself in a discussion lamenting what “Street Art” has become, remember DAIN, who pastes work on the street because it’s as natural to him as breathing. To him, it’s not about money or cool factor, this is just something that gives him a lot of satisfaction. Dude knows what it’s all about.

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