Get Social:

Jim Goldberg’s Powerful Series “Rich & Poor” Reveals The Dichotomy Between The Affluent And Destitute

USA. San Francisco, California. 1977. "My life is personal, but I will tell you one thing I'm too fat."

USA. San Francisco, California. 1977. “My life is personal, but I will tell you one thing I’m too fat.”

USA. San Francisco. 1981. Untitled. Goldstines. "My wife is acceptable. Our relationship is satisfactory." Edgar G "Edgar looks splendid here. His power and strength of character come through. He is a very private person who is not demonstrative of his affection; that has never made me unhappy. I accept him as he is. We are totally devoted to each other. Dear Jim: May you be as lucky in marriage!" Regina Goldstine

USA. San Francisco. 1981. Untitled. Goldstines.
“My wife is acceptable. Our relationship is satisfactory.” Edgar G
“Edgar looks splendid here. His power and strength of character come through. He is a very private person who is not demonstrative of his affection; that has never made me unhappy. I accept him as he is. We are totally devoted to each other.
Dear Jim: May you be as lucky in marriage!” Regina Goldstine

USA. San Francisco. 1977. "I love the picture. I am a homosexual. May be if I send one of the pictures you gave me, Jim, to my nephew he will understand how hard his uncle is struggling."

USA. San Francisco. 1977. “I love the picture. I am a homosexual. May be if I send one of the pictures you gave me, Jim, to my nephew he will understand how hard his uncle is struggling.”

From 1977 through 1985, Photographer Jim Goldberg took documentary-style pictures of transients in the Mission District and well-off San Franciscans in their homes and had the subjects write on their portraits. The combination of text and image is still incredibly intimate, even in this age of Instagram and Facebook. The dichotomy between the affluent and the destitute is obvious, yet the universality of the emotions the writers share is striking: pain, loneliness, disappointment, joy, security, contentment.

“I think my outrage about the desperation of the poor — and the dissatisfaction of the rich — stemmed in part from my belief that they represented a derogation from that path, a veering off course that had to be rooted out and documented.”

The combination of image and text is what makes this series so arresting and raw, but at the time of its initial publication in 1985 it was a radical decision, derided in a New York Times review as “a sad lack of trust on Mr. Goldberg’s part in both the power of his photographs to speak for themselves and in his viewers to understand them without comment.” Contemporary artists such as Brandon Stanton from Humans of New York, have taken this format and breathed new life into it through its immediate dissemination on the Internet.

Out of print since 1985, Jim Goldberg’s Rich and Poor has been completely re-designed and expanded by the artist for Steidl. Available for the first time in hardcover, Rich and Poor builds upon the classic combination of photographs and handwriting and adds a surplus of vintage material and contemporary photographs that have never been published or exhibited. (Source)

What comes across in these images is the shocking discrepancy of material goods and environments. The writings expose an expanded truth, though. There is obvious inequality in education and writing ability, leading to the impression that the poor suffer more than the rich. And that may be true in some ways — lack of opportunities, healthcare, and hope are all devastating. Pain is pain, though, and suffering is universal, as is love and gratitude. These portraits—touching, tender, hopeless, and sad—speak to our commonalities, as relevant in 2014 as in 1985.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

André da Loba’s Cardboard Sculptures

André da Loba was born in 1979 in Portugal, to a mama and a centaur. In a family of nine brothers he was the ugliest. His nose was very big, and still is. As a result, his parents sent him to join a sea circus”.  His work has been published in a myriad of publications including the New York Times, Time Magazine, The New Yorker, Newsweek, and the Washington Post. “Currently he lives in New York City, where he is secretly happy”.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Filippo Minelli’s Vibrant Smoke Bombs Consume The Natural Beauty Of Breathtaking Wilderness

Filippo Minelli - Digital PhotographyFilippo Minelli - Digital PhotographyFilippo Minelli - Digital Photography

Minelli15

Artist Filippo Minelli uses the ethereal smoke bomb to paint atmosphere in vibrant colors in his striking series Silence/Shapes. This title refers to Minelli’s intention of giving the concept of silence a physical form. His clouds of color give off the impression of a demanding presence, taking over the incredibly picturesque surroundings that it inhabits. The photographer’s smoke bombs always take place in breathtaking environments, like deep in the mountains are on the surface of a serene lake. The boldness of the colored smoke is a harsh contrast to the calmness of its environment. However, the smoke can be as unpredictable and wild as the wilderness it is in, as it swirls and explodes with color into the misty air of forests and meadows. Even further, some of the most incredible views of Filippo Minelli’s compositions are of his smoke bombs wafting through the air of abandoned buildings. The organic shapes that the clouds take on create an amazing juxtaposition against the manmade structures that enclose around it.

When exploring this aesthetically genius series of Minelli’s, you realize that there is a complete absence of human form. No people are ever present. It is almost as if the colored clouds are a life of their own, standing in for human life. In one of Filippo MInelli’s photographs, it even appears that a bright, orange cloud is resting on a bench outside. The smoke begins to take on personality and substance, traveling to different natural environments and absorbing their majesty. Filippo Minelli explains the inspiration behind the series.

“The idea came to his mind when looking at political demonstrations footage, when he noticed that when the smoke was coming into the scene people stopped screaming and the scene was visually silenced too, so he thought of the smoke as the shape of silence taking over.”

Silence/Shapes is now currently on view at Beetles + Huxley Gallery in London until September 5th.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Dragonfly Love

This is probably the best short film I have ever seen using only a camera phone. Director Thomas Hilland was asked to make the most out of Nokia N8’s smartphone camera. If the quality of the film doesn’t do it for you, I know I especially enjoyed the rotund men running around in costumes, battling each other with remote controlled dragonflies. Music was by the British band, Kap Bambino.

Currently Trending

Cat Obsession Has A Long Multi-Cultured History In Japan

japan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society painting
Our obsession with cats has a long and multi-cultured history. Long before Grumpy, Garfield and Felix, the Japanese were depicting cats in their artwork. A new exhibit set to open at New York’s Japan Society entitled “Life of Cats” studies the feline’s depiction during the Japanese Edo period. The period comprises a little over 250 years between 1615-1867, that saw a prolific use of cats (hi harmony), particularly in pieces made from Ukiyo-e woodblock prints. The printing technique was initially introduced to distribute texts of Buddhist scriptures. In 1765 a new technology made it possible to produce a single sheet using up to 20 colors. This allowed artists to take full advantage of palette and soon cats were appearing in a multitude of roles.
The first cat surfaced in Japan around the sixth century. They were brought over from China on ships transporting sacred scrolls written by monks. The Buddhists believed cats were mindful creatures and when an enlightened person died they would first come back as a cat before reaching nirvana. The exhibit at Japan Society is divided up into 5 categories: Cats and people, Cats as people, Cats vs. people, Cats transformed and Cats and play. Since the woodblock prints mainly depicted courtesans and Kabuki actors we see these figures in numerous works interacting with cats. The colors are exquisite and most of the scenes between human and feline is endearing. Some of the weirder prints are hybrid looking cat people and as mentioned earlier stems from the Buddhist belief of an enlightened being transforming into a cat before reaching nirvana. A popular motif was the common leisurely activities of a village, in these we see cats role playing as people relaxing at spas and playing in parks.  (via hyperallergic)
japan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society paintingjapan society painting

Currently Trending

Brand New Car Is Wrapped In Customized Vinyl To Look Like A Rust Bucket

Clyde Wraps - customized vinyl Clyde Wraps - customized vinyl Clyde Wraps - customized vinyl Clyde Wraps - customized vinyl

Have you ever had anything stolen? Perhaps a cellphone, or bag, or bike, or even a car? Well if you have been the victim of someone’s swift fingers, then you will really like this project. Some clever individual has decided to be pro-active and beat the thieves at their own game. After purchasing a brand new VW van, they have enlisted the help of UK based vinyl wrap company Clyde Wraps to avoid being the target of any crime.

With some clever coloring and detailing, they have made their 2014 Volkswagen T5 Sportline look like a rusty old van that shouldn’t be fit to drive around the city. Big rust stains drip down from the handles, the side panels look like they are disintegrating in front of your eyes, and the wing mirrors look like they have seen better days. Of course the actual body of the car is fine – the tires, the lights, and the windows all seem brand new and dent free.

But for someone looking quickly to see whether it is worth the trouble to steal this van, they will look twice. And who knows? Maybe the owner will even be able to leave their vehicle, walk around town and get away with not locking their doors! (Via Lost At E Minor)

Currently Trending

Seamus Conley’s Sci-Fi Point and Shoot Paintings

Gorgeous paintings by San Francisco based Seamus Conley.

“In my recent body of work the visual elements of Sci-Fi and point and shoot photography intersect. The resulting overlap of vivid imagery evokes the idea of parallel universes and alternate versions of ourselves. These other worldly landscapes are inhabited by “mall chicks and misfits” and conjure up questions of how we connect with these hypothetical figures. I like working with opposites, conflicting genres, and subjects from polarized sides of the social scale. I find that when you interweave contrary ideas, it gives a perspective on how strange it can be in present day life.”

Currently Trending

Tim Noble And Sue Webster’s British Rubbish

 

Tim Noble And Sue Webster make art that directly addresses the waste and aesthetic vulgarity of advanced consumerism and repositions the litter and gaudiness as a powerful visual allegory of human mortality, love and hope. The duo’s recent monograph British Rubbish, showcases their work from 1996 to present day in all its meticulously crafted glory— including the die cut book cover itself revealing the portraits of the artists.

Extravagant, irreverent, and always sharply clever, British Rubbish is both a paean to and sly denunciation of conspicuous consumption.

Currently Trending