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TILMAN HORNIG Steel and Aluminum sculptures

I’m loving these bizarre sculptures and paintings by German artist Tilman Hornig. I’ve scoured the internet and unfortunately can’t find a single press release or article on the artist but I guess sometimes the pictures do all the talking. More work by Hornig after the jump. (via)

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Margi Geerlinks

Margi Geerlinks’ work is concerned with the ways the human species creates an identity for themselves, and the forces that seem to govern this process. She takes four of the Ten Commandments and digitally imprints them on children. She portrays the ageing process by commenting on the ways modern society tries to slow that same process down. The directness of these images may come across as quite blunt, but every visible detail is there to warn us not to jump to conclusions. The children may bear these condemning moral codes on their chests, their pose and actions display a very human insecurity.

Being deeply physical, her art confronts us with the many things that literally mold our beings into shape. Displaying the effects of science, religion, morality and time, Geerlinks photographs are a timeless testament of the human condition. Taking the body as a canvas she tries to show both the current identity of the person photographed and the things that make her become someone else. She seems to categorize the different stages of a human life by representing them symbolically, but at the same time she makes us question the necessity of an age divided society.

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Studio Visit: Serena Cole’s Glittery Paintings Tap into our Dark Desires

As part of our ongoing partnership with In The Make, Beautiful/Decay is sharing a studio visit with artist Serena Cole. See the full studio visit and interview with Serena and other West Coast artists at www.inthemake.com.

Serena’s studio is in her Oakland apartment, a modest space that she has efficiently rigged to accommodate her needs. She’s set it up so that her studio takes up most of the apartment’s square footage, but she keeps things flexible with furnishings that are easily moved and rearranged. I’m always impressed with resourcefulness and am appreciative of the kind of ingenuity that comes out of necessity and that manages to circumvent a set of limitations. In fact, the idea of limitations kept coming up for me in thinking about Serena’s artwork because her pieces are very much visually dictated and confined by her reference material. Her work directly appropriates the fashion imagery of advertising campaigns and editorial spreads, highlighting the patterns and tropes used to elicit desire and encourage consumerism. In taking on this imagery, her work attempts to examine what is revealed about our collective psychology, the culture of consumption and escapism, and the complexity of fantasy. In our conversations, she acknowledged that she isn’t so much trying to create something new, but instead aims to deconstruct already existent imagery in the appropriation of it. But this is a slippery slope— in being so tightly tethered to the aesthetics of the fashion world, Serena’s work runs the risk of coming off as analogous instead of questioning. Serena is aware of this risk— in creating art within a framework already heavily loaded with well-established associations, value, and perimeters, she knows the trick is to get the viewer to recognize that there is actually a lot at stake amidst the glitz and glamour.

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Christopher St. Leger

Christopher St. Leger
It takes some serious skills to make photorealistic watercolors, but that’s exactly what Christopher St. Leger has going on in his work. He’s rendered a series of skateboarders kick-flipping and cruising which are particularly fluid, along with a range of impressive cityscapes. Like a looser, more colorful Richard Estes, St. Leger will trick you into thinking your looking at the real thing.

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What Marilyn Monroe And Other Celebrities Would Look Like If They Were Covered In Tattoos

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Ever wonder how your favorite celebrity/fictional characters would look like if they were covered in tattoos? Maybe your overly pretentious, inked hipster friends would be a little bit more accepting of your unhealthy obsession with the royal family…

In that case, thank your friends at Shopped Tattoos, a Tumblr based online gallery created by Cheyenne Randall that curates images of celebrities that were photoshopped to look like heavily tattooed, ordinary people.

ShoppedTattoos carefully selects/creates images that not only look timeless, but that feature celebrities that are relevant, and usually known for their refined, clean look. Some make more sense than others (for instance, Edward Norton in American History X, or Jonny Cash fit the tattoo profile), but for the most part, it is a bit shocking to see the royal family, or the Kennedys for that matter, covered in tattoos.

Although silly, I think that this project brings forth a series of questions that deal with the future of celebrity/fictional characters and their public appearance. Would our future celebrities be heavily tattooed? Are tattoos becoming mainstream, and plain ordinary (not part of a counter-culture)? Those are things we’ll have to observe in the distant and near future.

In the meantime, you can check up on more images on here.

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Emil Holmer

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I love Emil Holmer’s nutty bright colored graffiti jungles.If you happen to be in Berlin, on Friday, 12th of March 2010 from 6 to 9 p.m., Galerie Michael Janssen will be presenting a selection of his recent paintings.

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Matt Burden’s Brutal Graphics

Welcome to the world of brutal graphics care of UK based artist Matt Burden.

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Michael L. Abramson’s Unseen Photographs Of Chicago Nightlife In The 1970’s

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The posthumous exhibition of Michael L. Abramson’s work, titled, “Michael L. Abramson: Pulse of the Night,” features previously unseen photographs from night clubs in Chicago in the 1970’s. The grainy black and white shots highlight a side of Chicago that had been previously undocumented. The exhibition is co-presented by the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Columbia College Chicago Library.

Abramson, who died three years ago, shot on a Leica and spent a lot of time shooting in Chicago’s South Side, where he compiled work for his book “Light: On The South Side,” of which this work is a continuation of. Often compared to Brassai, who photographed the Parisian nightlife scene, Abramson showed a new side of Chicago. Abramson has work in the permanent collections of many institutions, such as the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago History Museum, the Milwaukee Art Museum, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, and the California Museum of Photography.

This show will be up through December 19th at the Columbia College Chicago Library.

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