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Mark Farid Wants To Spend 28 Days As Another Person Through A Virtual Reality Headset

Mark Farid Mark Farid  virtual realityMark Farid Mark Farid

Artist Mark Farid is attempting to undertake a strenuous social experiment and is asking for your assistance. He has a Kickstarter project called Seeing-I which is aimed at raising enough money to develop a headset that he will wear for 24 hours a day, for 28 days in a row. With the piece of technology he will live his daily life completely and utterly through the experience of another person. He will see everything through the eyes of the second person, including when they go to the cinema, to the toilet and having sex. The only prerequisites for this other human – naturally called “The Other” is to be over 21 years, a heterosexual male, currently living with his partner, and they must agree it to. If you personally suit those guidelines, you can apply here to become a part of the experiment.

Farid will throughout the process be living completely on display in a small box containing only a bed, a toilet and a shower. All of his actions will be open for all to witness and completely transparent. Because of the intensity of this project and what could be mentally damaging to most people, Farid will have the support of one psychologist for one hour a day, and will be the only time he is able to talk to someone.

The Seeing-I project will result in a documentary wanting to explore just how virtual reality affects us emotionally, the role of the individual in the larger society, how we define ourselves through what we see, and we know of ourselves. Farid says about the integrity of the project:

I don’t think any of the realities in which we live are genuine. We take this physical reality as ‘real’, but, you know, every building, road, park and garden has been designed… Everything within our existence is unnatural. We live in an entirely man-made world, where none of it is ‘real’. (Source) (Via Dazed Digital)

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Giovanni Bucci

 

This showreel is made of a selection of projects done by freelance designer Giovanni Bucci over the last few years. The audio track is a blended/synthesis of flavours from the latest productions of Marco Morano, which include dirty electro, over compressed grooves, classical atmospheres and re-built sound effects.

 

After experimenting and researching how audio can influence and inspire video and viceversa, they have worked out a personal formula. Instead of working audio and video separately, as it is common practice in the media industry, every draft of the video editing was followed by an audio adjustment  in a way that both authors could get influenced by the work of the other, until they felt that an harmonious final edit was achieved.

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Ordinary Show

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A “kinetic diary” of fairly ordinary gifs, but gifs galore! (The last one is just for Sasha.)

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Sheida Soleimani Dissects Iranian Politics Through Confrontational “National Anthem” Series

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Artist Sheida Soleimani has translated her frustration with her home country Iran and it’s politics into a captivating and symbolically complex photographic series called National Anthem. Her parents fled the country in 1979 after the revolution that overthrew the pro-western Pahlavi dynasty took place. (Both parents were targeted for actively opposing the regime – her mother tortured, and her father escaping across the border.) As a political refugee in America, Soleimani observed her country transition through several fundamental changes and decided to express her disdain visually. Each photographic scene is an exploration of cultural themes and symbols all representing different aspects of the last 35 years in Iran, and the many different dictators and leaders the country has seen. Soleimani says:

In my photographic scenarios, cultural symbols and signifiers are appropriated to create a narrative in regards to my position as an Iranian-American viewing the Middle East from an outside lens. The usage of specific colors and political figures form a symbolic lexicon that runs throughout the series, while party supplies hint at the doctrines of ‘political parties’. Each of the photographs addresses a specific time in Iranian history, while alluding to how both the East and West have responded to societal occurrences. Through incorporating multiple layers, the lexicon can be read and refashioned by the viewers’ ideologies, creating images that remain coeval, while acknowledging former origins. (Source)

Combining collage, installation, performance and object assemblage, Soleimani creates powerful, emotional art-as-activism. The fierce mark making, scrunched up images, burnt candles, and mutilated cultural objects all have the hand of an aggrieved survivor. Managing to turn her deeply personal history into a series of clever, sarcastic visual puns, Soleimani’s artistic therapy is beneficial to us all.

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Artorialust



While the majority of gallery goers attend openings under the pretense of pretending to look at the art, we all know what we go for.

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Mudchicken Loves To Smoke

Seattle based artist Vincent Pacheco also known as “Mudchicken” creates beautiful mixed media collages and paintings. These cigarette paintings are hilarious. I feel the cancer coming on just by looking at them.

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Artist Reflects On The Rape Of His Mother In Breathtaking/Heartbreaking Photographs

Jordan Sullivan - Digital C-Print

Jordan Sullivan - Digital C-Print

Jordan Sullivan - Digital C-Print

 

Jordan Sullivan’s series The Burial Cloud examines and reflects on the rape of his mother in 1973, Petacalco, Mexico. Each photograph is just a glimpse into a memory, a fleeting moment that we cannot hold onto or make sense of. Sullivan has created this series from found photos and letters from his mother, as well as his own staged photography. The tone in the photographs quickly changes from adventurous and carefree to somber and destructive, all the while embodying the same distant vagueness. This leaves us with curiosity and wonder of the events that took place. Sullivan explains:

“[My mother] had traveled with her friends to Petacalco in search of an epic wave that a pair of surfers had recently discovered.”

This series lays out the event just as it would appear as a memory; in fragmented images that shift throughout time. There is no implication of a time or place in much of the imagery, just a window inward reflecting on the human psyche. The emotion of the woman shown, the photographer’s mother, changes from bright and excited to isolated and alone. The Burial Cloud is a journey in which we must piece together a story we cannot fully understand. A story told through disjointed, stunning images that include roaring oceans, burning flora, and scenes of discontent. These ethereal photographs radiate feelings of discovery, doubt, youth, and fear. Sullivan shines light on a delicate subject while beautifully capturing his mother and a tragic past. The Burial Cloud will be released as an illustrated biography in 2016, and will include photographs, text, and collages.

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Jenny Fine Reanimates Her Dead Grandmother

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American artist Jenny Fine creates Flat Granny, a life-sized cardboard cut-out of her grandmother. The artist is interested in creating a tangible ‘thing’ that would resemble her dear, and very influential relative. With this cut-out, she attempts to extend a relationship beyond death. Apart from the cutout, Fine goes a bit further and develops a more’ carnal’ approach to the cut-out of her grandmother…

In an interest to reanimate her still image, I turned Flat Granny’s photographic body into a costume.

The bizarre, yet endearing idea is inspired by Victorian traditions of post-mortem photography, as well as the novel concept of a Flat Daddy/Mommy , photographic cut-outs of deployed soldiers for their children/ family while the soldier is away at war.

The photographs you see here feel and look surreal. However, there is no way to escape these vibes when you are looking at an object that in essence represents the absence of someone dearly missed and loved. This project is personal, but it also goes deeper than just a moving gesture from a loving granddaughter. It brings forth the realities of our attachment to the physical world- and the physical body, as well as the lengths we would go to in order to fill that void we feel when we’ve lost someone important in our lives.

Can something like this do the trick? Or would it be just plain weird and inappropriate?

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